Recent Posts
NYC Blogs
Click here for a list of NYC blogs
Newsfeeds
Search This Blog

Levy's Legacy at Bronx Science
September 16th, 2011

The Times yesterday had an interesting story on the exodus of teachers from the prestigious Bronx High School of Science. According to Anna Phillips, eight of the school’s 20 social studies teachers decided not to return this year, sending the turnover rate at what one would think would be a desirable to teach to 19 percent, five percentage points higher than for the city as a whole. Phillips traces the discontent back at least as far as 2005 but actually it dates before that to the pre-mayoral control days and the region of now largely forgotten Chancellor Harold Levy.

Back in the Giuliani administration in 1999, Stanley Blumenstein announced his retirement as principal of the selective public school. A search committee unanimously recommended William Stark, an administrator and social studies teacher serving as interim president, to fill the post.

Levy, a graduate of Bronx Science, balked, reportedly wanting a scientist to fill the post, not an educator — although there was never an indication that any top scientist even wanted the job. Levy asked the committee to find someone else.

Levy was a corporate lawyer when he was named chancellor and, like Cathie Black a decade later, needed a waiver to become chancellor. (He now works in finance and raised eyebrows in 2009 for a $500,000 contribution to Al Sharpton.)

To many observers his handling of the situation at Bronx Science was a classic indication of what can happen when people with little experience running schools control them. Faculty and parents disputed Levy’s notion that a scientist would be the best pick for the job. “Running a public high school, they say, is more like running a fine restaurant than a political campaign, a foundation or a college. At Bronx Science, they say, the importance of spin and public relations pales compared with the mundane ability to deal with cantankerous union officials, powerful custodians and 2,700 needy, if talented, adolescents,” the Times wrote.

Levy called for more candidates leaving Stark to stew. By the time he finally decided maybe Stark was the best candidate after all months later Stark had taken a job with well-regarded public school in an affluent Long Island community.

A Daily News editorial summed it up this way: “Levy effectively nixed the choice [of Stark]: He wanted a Nobel laureate. An Einstein type to order pencils and supervise custodians. Bottom line: Levy never found his genius, a fed-up Stark took a job on Long Island and Bronx Science suffered.”

With no scientists having presented themselves for the post, Levy then appointed Valerie Reidy, like Stark, a teacher at Bronx Science.

“What a folly the whole thing is because Bill Stark was infinitely better, and they chased this really talented person out,” one teacher told the Times.

Reidy, the New York Sun’s Andrew Wolf wrote was “on no one’s short list to assume the top job. But she found herself in the right place at the right time, proof of the Peter Principle, which holds that in a hierarchy, employees rise to the level of their incompetence. ”

By most accounts, things since have not gone well even after Mayor Michael Bloomberg named Joel Klein to replace Levy and assumed control of the schools. So far the Department of Education seems to be standing by Levy.

In 2008, math teachers filed a complain against an assistant principal, reportedly an ally of Reidy’s, accusing her of harassment and arbitrary decision-making. An arbiter recommended that the assistant principal and a teacher at odds with her both be reassigned; the department rejected that suggestions.

Whether the latest will spur a change is anyone’s guess but many writing in to comment on Phillips’ article hope it will. One, Geoffrey Nutter, who taught there for a year, wrote, “I loved my students, they were great. My coworkers were smart and hardworking. But I have never met anyone as cruel and petty as Principal Valerie Reidy, from whom I had to endure threats, intimidation, and ultimately denial of tenure and the end of my public school teaching career in New York City.”

By on September 16, 2011, 3:19 pm
In category: Education,Gotham City | 8 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


8 Responses to “Levy's Legacy at Bronx Science”

  1. Linda Johnson Says:
    September 17th, 2011 at 1:04 pm

    Threats and intimidation on the job are against the law. Any teacher who is a victim of this should carry a clipboard and write down the threat or act of intimidation with the time and the person involved.

    It’s time for teachers to take a course called “The Teacher and the Law” and avail themselves of the knowledge. It isn’t fair to the students for these teachers to retire or transfer before making a formal complaint to the state or federal authorities.

  2. A. S. Evans Says:
    September 19th, 2011 at 10:16 am

    This is just sad.

  3. jordan high heels Says:
    October 14th, 2011 at 10:20 pm

    An American native, the white-footed deer Air Jordan Heels home outdoors, living independently in burrows built in grassy cheap jordan heels. Under normal circumstances, white-footed deer mice are occasional autumn home invaders; however, in areas where new construction has destroyed their natural habitat, these cheap jordan heels for women refuge in homes, garages and attics.

  4. il varva Says:
    October 6th, 2012 at 7:58 am

    I would like to thank you for the efforts you’ve put in writing this blog. I am hoping the same high-grade website post from you in the upcoming as well. Actually your creative writing skills has inspired me to get my own site now. Really the blogging is spreading its wings rapidly. Your write up is a good example of it.

  5. Truman Tanabe Says:
    December 11th, 2012 at 10:47 am

    It’s amazing in support of me to have a web site, which is helpful for my knowledge. thanks admin|

  6. Sid Stumbaugh Says:
    January 24th, 2013 at 12:34 pm

    You’ve a significant good point of view and I that can compare with it. You deserve to have a positive feedback for this. Your site has helped me a lot to restore more confidence in myself. Thanks! Ive recommended it to my friends as well.

  7. Ascot Yungwirth Says:
    June 14th, 2013 at 6:42 pm

    I happened to know quite well both Principals mentioned in this article. William Stark, who retired in 2001 to accept a suburban public high school district Principalship on Long Island, was my junior professional colleague in both civil service seniority and faculty professional status at the time we began sharing a professional office in 1970. Has anyone noticed the recent buzz in the press and in the media tagging William Stark,by independence day allegedly to be both the retired Superintendent pensioner and the newly rehired Superintendent on his former full salary at a Westchester public high school district, allegedly raking in over four hundred fifty thousand dollars per year not far from where the Principal who replaced him, Valerie Reidy, the daughter of my mother’s long time social duplicate bridge league competition partner, lives,if he can pull off what the media has has apin doctored Some of us, in fact, know more about William and Valerie’s mutual careers, as professional educators and professional public trust fiscal administrators than whatever has been buzzed in the media.

  8. Ninja Blender Says:
    February 21st, 2014 at 6:37 pm

    If you wish for to obtain much from this paragraph then you have to
    apply these methods to your won webpage.

Leave a Reply

Gotham Gazette the Place for Politics and Policy

Gotham Gazette is published by Citizens Union Foundation and is made possible by support from the Robert Sterling Clark Foundation, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the Altman Foundation,the Fund for the City of New York and donors to Citizens Union Foundation. Please consider supporting Citizens Union Foundation's public education programs. Critical early support to Gotham Gazette was provided by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

RSS Feed