Recent Posts
NYC Blogs
Click here for a list of NYC blogs
Newsfeeds
Search This Blog

Con Ed lockout on hold thanks to power of Cuomo, storms
July 26th, 2012

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has faced some criticism for not getting involved in the Con Edison labor dispute earlier — but better late than never.

With storms on the horizion, Cuomo announced today that he has convinced both sides to have “necessary personnel” return to work for the sake of public safety.

“At my request and in the interest of the safety of New Yorkers, Con Ed and Local 1-2 have agreed that the necessary personnel will immediately return to work to prepare for the possibility of an approaching storm and will remain on the job for the duration of any emergency and any following repairs,” Cuomo said in a statement.

This follows a letter he sent yesterday asking for the state to oversee meetings between labor and management.

By on July 26, 2012, 1:40 pm
In category: Albany,Crime & Safety,Eye on Albany,Gotham City | 1 Comment »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


City Reaps $260M from Same-Sex Marriage Law
July 24th, 2012

Mayor Michael Bloomberg says the legalization of same-sex marriage last year helped generate almost $260 million in revenue for the city.

Gay marriage is a win for everybody,” he said at a news conference earlier today across the street from the marriage license building in Manhattan, where he was joined by other elected officials.

Council Speaker Christine Quinn, who also spoke, said the economic activity generated by marriage equality “has put a lot of people to work, helped restaurants, helped catering halls and helped others.”

NYC & Co., the city’s tourism arm, and the City Clerks office conducted a survey of more than 1,700 same-sex couples, finding that since the Marriage Equality Act went into effect in July 2011, 67 percent of gay couples held wedding receptions at restaurants, homes or catering halls in the five boroughs. The average cost was $9,000 per wedding.

The City Clerk says 75,000 marriage licenses were issued from late July 2011 to mid July 2012, with over 7,000 couples issued marriage licenses identifying themselves as same-sex.

Quinn said that advocates for same-sex marriage now need to turn their attention to the national stage.

Our job now is to make sure every American has that opportunity on a national level,” she said.

By on July 24, 2012, 5:12 pm
In category: Civil Rights,Economy,Gotham City | 1 Comment »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


City Council Members, Business Groups Rally Against Soda Ban
July 23rd, 2012

City Council members and a beverage-industry backed group rallied on the steps of City Hall today to protest the Bloomberg administration’s proposed soda ban.

Members of New Yorkers for Beverage Choices were joined by city council members and representatives from a local soft drink and beer workers’ union to speak out against the proposal to restrict the size of sweetened drinks sold at certain stores to 16 ounces.

The speakers explained that the regulation would cause economic problems, as well as violate New Yorkers’ right to choose

“This is going to set up an unfair competitive advantage,” said Letitia James, city councilwoman for District 36.

The ban will affect only restaurants and other venues, such as movie theaters and ballparks, that require a health inspection report. Grocery stores and vendors like 7-Eleven, home of the Big Gulp, will not be restricted which Councilman Daniel Halloran argued is inequitable and thus illegal.

“That’s the standard. Either it applies to everyone or it doesn’t,” he said.

Halloran and other soda ban opponents said they were frustrated with the public’s relative inability to affect the decision on the proposal, which was recently backed by the city’s largest healthcare union.

A Board of Health hearing in Long Island City tomorrow may be the only opportunity to comment, and Halloran described the Board as a “strong mayoralty agency.”

“The agency’s already made up its mind. Having the hearing is pointless,” Halloran explained. “The mayor chose to go this route because he knew he would never get this bill passed through the City Council.”

Members of the City Council have already begun taking up the issue with the legislature in Albany, and Halloran anticipates a lawsuit against the ban almost as soon as it is passed.

“The City Council’s function is to set the laws of the city of New York,” he said. “We’re not going to let one man become king in the city of New York.”

By on July 23, 2012, 1:59 pm
In category: City Hall,Gotham City,Health,Law | 5 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


City BOE agrees to use modern tech for tallying votes
July 17th, 2012

Unofficial election night results will now be read from portable memory devices at police precincts, rather than off strips of paper, after a unanimous decision by the city’s Board of Elections earlier today.

The results will then be transferred to the New York Police Department, which will give the data to the press.

Elections Commissioner Juan Carlos “J.C.” Polanco said the new election night process will be in place for the September state and local primary elections.

“This is exciting for us. What it’s going to avoid is the element of human error,” he said, adding that the result would be “incredible accuracy.

The current process involves scissors, tape and calculators, and requires BOE staffers to count votes by hand late into the night.

Problems with the current process were highlighted after the June 26 primary, when unofficial election night tallies showed U.S. Rep. Charles Rangel beating his closest challenger by a respectable margin. Rangel’s lead narrowed over the next few days as it became clear that hundreds of votes had potentially gone uncounted because of the byzantine tallying process. (Rangel still won in the end, even after the votes were accounted for.)

The board was roundly criticized in the press for their handling of the election.

By on July 17, 2012, 6:07 pm
In category: Electoral Politics,Gotham City,Governing | 3 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


State Board of Elections gives city counterpart more encouragement
July 17th, 2012

All four commissioners of the state Board of Elections now say the city can change election night voting procedures without a change in state law. Here’s the letter the NYBOE sent today.

It’s an encouraging sign, though it still remains to be seen whether the city’s BOE will follow through.

The issue is expected to be a topic of much discussion at this afternoon’s NYCBOE hearing. Watch our Twitter feed for updates.

By on July 17, 2012, 1:29 pm
In category: Electoral Politics,Gotham City | 4 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


NYPIRG provides look at Cuomo's top donors
July 16th, 2012

With all the campaign filings pouring in over the weekend perhaps the most scrutinized has been those of Gov. Andrew Cuomo. A little scrutiny never hurt anyone; so here is the New York Public Interest Research Group’s breakdown of Cuomo’s top donors. See anything interesting, let us know.

Cuomo’s Top Donors

By on July 16, 2012, 2:49 pm
In category: Albany,Eye on Albany | 2 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


Independent Democrats donate to Dem challenger
July 16th, 2012

I reported earlier this year that Albany County legislator Shawn Morse, the man challenging Senate Democrats’ deputy minority leader Sen. Neil Breslin, had been in talks with the Independent Democratic Conference.

Today filings reveal that the IDC and its leader, state Sen. Jeff Klein, are ready to put their money where their mouths are when it comes to challenging incumbent Democrats. The IDC donated $9,300 to Morse and Klein donated $9,300 from his campaign war chest.

“It’s really nothing personal about Neil,” Klein told Fred Dicker on Talk 1300 AM earlier today. “This is about growing the IDC. There’s no secret that we want to add members.”

Breslin issued a news release attacking his challenger and Klein.

“My opponent has taken a significant sum of money from Republican backed Senator Jeff Klein.”
“How can the residents of our communities trust an individual who claims he is working for them when he is, in fact, taking money from Republicans whose main focus is protecting the wealthy on the backs of New York’s struggling working families? When it comes to voting in the Senate, who will he be beholden to? This is a man who changes his party affiliation at will for personal political gain.”

“My opponent has taken a significant sum of money from Republican backed Senator Jeff Klein,” he said. “How can the residents of our communities trust an individual who claims he is working for them when he is, in fact, taking money from Republicans whose main focus is protecting the wealthy on the backs of New York’s struggling working families? When it comes to voting in the Senate, who will he be beholden to? This is a man who changes his party affiliation at will for personal political gain.”

By on July 16, 2012, 2:33 pm
In category: Albany,Eye on Albany | 3 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


East River Ferry Ridership Reaches 1 Million
July 16th, 2012

Since its launch early last summer, the East River Ferry has carried one million passengers, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and City Council Speaker Christine Quinn announced today.

That’s more than double the predicted 409,000 riders a year, which the BillyBey Ferry Company cites as evidence of the program’s success.

Surpassing the one-million milestone is a testament to how popular our service has been with commuters, tourists and leisure travelers in the first year, BilleyBey CEO Paul Goodman said in a press release today.

After unexpected levels of ridership beginning last summer, the $9.3 million project now has larger ferries on weekends and concession stands on every ride.

To continue expanding and improving service for the remainder of the ferry’s three-year pilot program and beyond, Bloomberg announced a survey that will be available for riders to take online, on the ferry and by phone.

“Ferry service is only going to get better for the next million passengers,” he said in the release.

By on July 16, 2012, 11:22 am
In category: Community Development,Gotham City,Transportation,Waterfront | Comments Off

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


New front in battle for state Senate
July 13th, 2012

Eighty-two-year-old Republican state Sen. Owen Johnson has indicated he will not seek reelection this year, throwing into doubt the balance of power in the Senate.

Democratic County Legislator Ricardo Montano will now face whomever the GOP establishment picks over weekend meetings, according to Newsday.

Last time around in the legislative soap opera, Senate Democrats looked to be positioned well to pick up and defend seats on Long Island until, well, they blew it in a pretty ugly way.

Democrats face an uphill battle this year as Republicans control the Senate 33-29 and also appear to have the loyalty of the Independent Senate Democrats, who have toyed with running incumbent Democrats in the primary and have met with at least one primary challenger to a long-term incumbent Democrat.

By on July 13, 2012, 12:21 pm
In category: Albany,Electoral Politics,Eye on Albany | 2 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


AP: BOE can change election night counting process
July 13th, 2012

The Associated Press is reporting that the city Board of Elections has received a legal opinion from the State Board of Elections that would allow them to change their election night closing procedures without actually changing the law.

As we reported earlier this week, the city BOE is considering changing its procedures so that it can use electronic data from voting machines when polls close to tally unofficial vote counts rather than using the current process that involves using scissors, tape, and calculators and requires BOE staffers to count votes by hand late into the night.

Recent elections, including the Congressional contest between Rep. Charles Rangel and State Sen. Adriano Espaillat, have seen election night totals come in drastically different from the eventual official count. Elected officials like Councilwoman Gale Brewer and Assemblyman Brian Kavanagh want to change the process to avoid a further corrosion of public trust in the election process.

As we reported yesterday, Brewer will be holding a Council hearing on August 8 to look into the recent problems at the BOE.

Brewer has supported a Kavanagh-sponsored bill in the Assembly that would have allowed the BOE to use electronic data. The measure passed the Assembly but failed in the Senate; now it looks like the board can move ahead with the change in process without any official legislation.

By on July 13, 2012, 9:05 am
In category: Electoral Politics,Gotham City,Governing,Law | 1 Comment »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


Council to hold hearing on Board of Elections bungling
July 12th, 2012

While at least one member of the Board of Election wants an apology for the criticism they and their staff faced for their handling of the results of the recent Democratic Congressional primary between U.S. Rep. Charlie Rangel and state Sen. Adriano Espaillat, the board is still facing major scrutiny from elected officials.

Council Speaker Christine Quinn announced today that Councilwoman Gale Brewer, chair of the Governmental Operations Committee, will be holding a hearing on the BOE on August 8 to examine how to prevent future delays and mishaps.

The Board of Elections inability to accurately tally and report the results of last months Congressional primary in a timely manner threatens the credibility of the democratic process,” Quinn said in a statement. “The problems that came to light on election night raise serious concerns about the integrity of our citys elections that must be addressed. New Yorkers must be able to trust that when they cast a valid ballot, their vote will be counted accurately.”

Brewer, who has been pushing a bill by Assemblyman Brian Kavanagh that would allow the board to tally votes on election night with electronic data taken from voting machines rather than by hand, is anxious to see issues at the BOE addressed.

As anyone who has read a newspaper editorial over the past few weeks is well aware, the June 26 primary was rife with allegations of mistakes and improprieties,” she said in a statement. “I take very seriously any and all claims of malfeasance and voter disenfranchisement.”

The Board of Elections inability to accurately tally and report the results of last months Congressional primary in a timely manner threatens the credibility of the democratic process.
The problems that came to light on election night raise serious concerns about the integrity of our Citys elections that must be addressed. New Yorkers must be able to trust that when they cast a valid ballot, their vote will be counted accurately.
By on July 12, 2012, 1:55 pm
In category: Civil Rights,Governing | 4 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


Sanders responds to Kelly's defense of stop-and-frisk
July 11th, 2012

Seventy seven people have been shot in the city between July 2nd through the 8th of this month. Addressing the violence, Police Commissioner Ray Kelly told reporters yesterday: “There doesnt seem to be any major community response. Many of them will speak out about stop-and-frisk [but are] shockingly silent when it comes to the level of violence right in their own communities.”

His statement has unsurprisingly raised the ire of a number of community leaders.

Count Councilman James Sanders as one of those outraged by Kelly’s comments.

Commissioner Kelly seems to be speaking out of both sides of his mouth asking why there is no outrage over existing gun violence and then championing a policy that has failed to prevent it. Put simply, if stop-and-frisk was working, gun violence would be going down, not up. Our communities would be safer, not more dangerous. And people would feel more willing to engage their local precincts in community action against violence criminals, not afraid for their own civil liberties when approached by police.

Sen. Eric Adams told the NY Post that Kelly “basically said black elected officials dont care about the safety of their community.

Here is Sanders’ full statement: Read the rest of this entry »

By on July 11, 2012, 3:27 pm
In category: Crime & Safety | 2 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


High school entrepreneur wannabes sought for city tech program
July 11th, 2012

A new program aims to expose high school students to the city’s growing Internet technology sector by teaming them up with industry experts to create Android phone apps and business plans.

The New York Economic Development Corp. and the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship are sponsoring the bootcamp for teenagers, which starts in August. Thirty high school students will be picked to participate in the program, called NYC Generation Tech. Applications are being accepted until July 20.

“This is another initiative to foster talent in [the technology] sector, which is going to be critical to our economy going forward,” said Patrick Muncie, a spokesman for the EDC.

To be eligible for NYC Generation Tech, students should be rising 10th or 11th graders who are either from a school where 50 percent or more of students qualify for free or reduced price school lunches or who qualify for the food assistance programs themselves.

The primary $100,000 of funding for NYC Generation Tech came from the city.

Terry Bowman, executive director for NFTE New York Metro Area, said the organization is looking to raise more money to provide scholarships and ongoing support for students after they complete the program.

By on July 11, 2012, 2:18 pm
In category: Community Development,Education,Tech | 2 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


NYC Jails Action Coalition Pushes Reform
July 9th, 2012

A recently formed coalition is calling for a reduction in the use of solitary confinement and what they refer to as a “culture of brutality” in the city’s jail system.

The New York City Jails Action Coalition, which formed in December of last year and is comprised of members of organizations that have worked on the issues for years, held its first protest outside the Board of Correction on 51 Chambers St. earlier today.

“The United Nations has likened solitary confinement to torture,” said member Richard Sawyer, referring to a statement by the UN’s Special Rapporteur on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment that specifically called out the U.S.’s disproportionate use of punitive segregation.

The issue of solitary confinement has recently been discussed on a national level, and NYC JAC is using that momentum to promote their cause.

Sawyer specifically condemned the practice of putting someone in 10-day solitary confinement for “horseplay,” butDepartment of Correction spokeswoman Sharman Stein said the term trivialized the problem.

“The Department’s first responsibility is to protect everyone in its custody. When an inmate assaults another inmate or an employee, he cannot remain in his housing unit, nor should he,” read an official DOC statement. “There are consequences for harming others.”

NYC JAC and its member groups recommend the city adopt a policy similar to one in Mississippi, where punitive segregation is only used as a last resort. In Mississippi’s case, the policy change led to reduced violence a point the coalition emphasizes.

The coalition also alleges that the DOC condones brutal practices, and spends millions settling lawsuits from former inmates TheDOC has denied those allegations.

The New York City jails system is one of the largest in the U.S., with a daily population of 13,000as of 2010.

By on July 9, 2012, 6:12 pm
In category: Crime & Safety,Gotham City | 5 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


Top Senate Democrats slam DEC on fracking regs release
July 5th, 2012

Top state Senate Democrats have called on the Department of Environmental Conservation to explain why it shared details about proposed regulations for hydrofracking with representatives of the national gas industry more than a month before the public.

The senators said the DEC’s action had given industry “an advantage in shaping the proposed regulations to its own benefit.”

The letter was signed by Sens. Liz Krueger, Martin Malave Dilan, Thomas K. Duane and Kevin Parker.

The Environmental Working Group obtained records through the Freedom of Information Law that showed regulators giving drilling companies’ exclusive, early access to the proposed policy.

Go here to read the full statement by the Senate Democrats:

2012-07-05 Letter to Martens Re Regs Release

By on July 5, 2012, 3:05 pm
In category: Environment,Gotham City | Comments Off

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


Rangel and Espaillat absentee votes set to be counted
July 5th, 2012

With the results still uncertain in Rep. Charlie Rangel’s most difficult primary battle so far, attention has turned to the opening of absentee and affidavit ballots by the city Board of Election.
Rangel’s most prominent rival, state Sen. Adriano Espaillat, has filed court papers and called the primary a phantom election because of discrepancies in how votes were tallied. He is trailing behind Rangel by just 802 votes, with over 2,000 absentee and affidavit ballots left to be counted. The count could continue into next week.
At the BOE’s Manhattan borough office today, four “administrative bi-partisan assistants” worked through piles of ballots to verify that voter names, poll sites and registration was correct on the forms.
After each ballot is verified, the assistant displays the ballot to watchers and lawyers representing Rangel and Espaillat on the other side of the table nearly two feet away. At any point they can make an objection to the validity of a
ballot. Contested ballots are sent for court review. No objections had been made by about 2 p.m.
One observer from the Espaillat’s camp, Al Kurland, 63, noted that the process was like waiting for the paint to dry.”
He called the process “deeply flawed.”
For three days you sit or stand 12 to 15 feet away from people doing
the validity or invalidity of ballots and you just wait for the
results,” he said. Youre not really observing the process in totality

With the results still uncertain in Rep. Charlie Rangel’s most difficult primary battle so far, attention has turned to the opening of absentee and affidavit ballots by the city Board of Election.

Rangel’s most prominent rival, state Sen. Adriano Espaillat, has filed court papers and called the primary a phantom election because of discrepancies in how votes were tallied. He is trailing behind Rangel by just 802 votes, with over 2,000 absentee and affidavit ballots left to be counted. The count could continue into next week.

At the BOE’s Manhattan borough office today, four “administrative bi-partisan assistants” worked through piles of ballots to verify voter names, poll sites and registration.

After each ballot is verified, an assistant shows the ballot to watchers and lawyers representing Rangel and Espaillat on either side of the table nearly two feet away. They can object at any point. Contested ballots are sent for court review. No objections had been made by about 2 p.m.

One observer from Espaillat’s camp, Al Kurland, 63, noted that the process was like waiting for the paint to dry.”

He called the process “deeply flawed.”

For three days you sit or stand 12 to 15 feet away from people doingthe validity or invalidity of ballots and you just wait for the

results,” he said. Youre not really observing the process in totality

The police department reported unofficial results for the June 26 primary that showed zeroes in 79 out of the districts 506 precincts. Many Latinos whose votes might have helped tip the election in Espaillats favor are registered in 65of the districts that contained zeroes.

BOE spokeswoman Valerie Vazquez said the NYPD puts zeroes for sometimes illegible or even accurate data.”

“We dont have an answer as to why they do that,” she said.

At a BOE public hearing on Tuesday, Steven Richman, an attorney for the BOE, defended the agency’s performance during the primary.

The only thing out of the ordinary was the extraordinary need for affidavit ballots in Brooklyn and Manhattan,” he said, adding that the BOE was proud to have a sufficient amount of affidavits to provide for all voters.

Richman said Thursday’s counting of the absentee and affidavit ballots would include two bipartisan members from each borough, a watcher and a note taker at the table to make objections to open or not open specific ballots.

By on July 5, 2012, 12:54 pm
In category: Gotham City | 1 Comment »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


Development Corps Illegally Lobbied City Council: AG
July 3rd, 2012

Three local development corporations illegally lobbied City Council members in 2008 and 2009 to promote development projects in Willets Point and Coney Island, the state attorney general says.

Attorney General Eric Schneiderman today announced a settlement with the city’s Economic Development Corporation, Flushing-Willets Point-Corona Local Development Corporation and the Coney Island Development Corporation. The settlement included provisions to increase transparency and reduce loopholes through which these organizations lobbied New York City officials. However, no fine or other punishment was meted out.

Members of the groups ghostwrote op-eds and prepared testimony in order to create the appearance of a grassroots movement in favor of development projects they were backing, the attorney general said. Influencing legislation is barred by statute for local development corporations.

These local development corporations flouted the law by lobbying elected officials, both directly and through third parties, to win approval of their favored projects, Schneiderman said in a press release. This agreement will bring greater transparency, and ensure accountability for these and other local development corporations operating in New York State.

The agreement includes mandatory compliance training for local development corporation employees, more public disclosure of interaction between these corporations and reminders that it is illegal to lobby the Council regarding development projects, even indirectly.

The EDC will be restructuring to remove the organization’s local development corporation status to avoid further violations.

The New York City Economic Development Corporation intends to undertake a restructuring, the primary effect of which will be to allow the company to remain a not-for-profit corporation, but to cease to be a local development corporation,” Patrick Muncie, an EDC spokesman, said in a statement. “As discussed with the New York State Attorney General, NYCEDC is currently taking all appropriate steps to effectuate this restructuring.

City Comptroller John Liu described the restructuring as a long time coming.

While these revelations of illegal lobbying are alarming, we cannot say that they come as a surprise,” Liu said in a later release. New York Citys economic development process is in dire need of greater transparency, accountability, and inclusiveness, something EDCs current culture fails to provide.

By on July 3, 2012, 2:29 pm
In category: Albany,Gotham City,Governing,Law | Comments Off

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


Cuomo issues few 'messages of necessity' this session
July 2nd, 2012

Gov. Andrew Cuomo only issued five messages of necessity this past legislative session, compared to the 29 he issued the year before and the 57 Gov. David Paterson issued in 2010. We bring you these numbers thanks to a legislative session breakdown by Bill Mahoney of the New York Public Interest Research Group.

Messages of necessity can be issued by a governor to allow a bill to be voted on before it reaches its normally required three day aging period. That period is in place in some part to allow proper vetting, debate and public disclosure of legislation. However, in Albany, major legislative deals have been pushed through late at night before anyone can actually examine them thanks to messages of necessity issued by governor.

Cuomo was criticized for issuing such messages during a late-nightblitzkrieg of legislation in March that saw the passage of a new pension tier, DNA database legislation and the extremely controversial district lines.

Along with the reduced number of messages of necessity was a markedly reduced number of passed pieces of legislation. There were only 571 pieces of legislation passed by both houses this legislative session — that is less than the 588 passed in 2009 when the Senate was paralyzed by a coup. It is the lowest number in recent memory. Mahoney provides numbers dating back to 1995 and this year is resoundingly the lowest.

Mahoney notes that, the report ”…does not draw conclusions on the substance of bills or a particular legislators impact, or the overall legislative output, since legislative ‘productivity’ is more complicated and subjective than simple numbers. However, we believe that these are one of the many parts of the discussion about the activity of the Legislature and individual legislators.”

By on July 2, 2012, 11:14 am
In category: Albany,Eye on Albany | 11 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


Appeals court strikes down NY taxi decision
June 28th, 2012

A federal appeals court says New York City doesn’t have to require its fleet of licensed yellow taxis be wheelchair accessible, reversing an earlier ruling and upsetting disability advocates.

The court determined earlier today that the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission was not in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The court said in its unanimous decision that:

Plaintiffs contend that the TLC violates the ADA because it could require more taxis to be accessible, but does not. The TLCs licensing requirements do not discriminate and do not cause anyone else to discriminate, by licensing or otherwise. The TLCs licenses do not bar taxi owners from operating accessible vehicles. The only medallions that specify whether the taxi must be accessible specify that the taxi operated pursuant to that license be accessible. No doubt, more such taxis would be on the streets if the TLC required more of them to be accessible. But the TLCs failure to use its regulatory authority does not amount to discrimination within the meaning of the ADA or its regulations.

Instead, the court blamed the taxi industry for the problem.

The class-action lawsuit was brought against the TLC by two people who use wheelchairs and advocacy organizations.

Chris Noel, one of the two plaintiffs, said in a statement that he was “very disappointed” but would continue advocating for accessible taxis.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg called the ruling “consistent with common sense and the practical needs of both the taxi industry and the disabled.”

Of the 13,237 medallions allowed by law, only 231 are designated for wheelchair accessible vehicles, the court said. “The record shows that the chances of hailing any taxi in Manhattan within 10 minutes is 87.33 percent, whereas the chances of hailing an accessible taxi within 10 minutes is 3.31 percent,” the court wrote.

By on June 28, 2012, 5:17 pm
In category: Transportation | 1 Comment »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


A race brewing in the 22nd
June 28th, 2012

The battle between Republican Sen. Martin Golden and Democratic challenger Andrew Gounardes is on the top watch list for Senate Democrats who are hungry to get back into the majority or at least add a seat or two.

Golden is a logical target for Democrats — he is one of only two remaining Republicans that represent the five boroughs; he is a long-term incumbent; and the Republican majority has used “New York City” as a derogatory term towards Senate Democrats and their issues.

Democrats have had some trouble raising funds and their list of challengers has come together slowly because of the late-in-the-game deal on redistricting, but Goundares has been running hard since he declared in January and the press releases attacking Golden on issues have been coming fast and furious.

Today’s shot across Golden’s bow has to do with bridge toll relief. But housing issues are the hot button in the race at the moment. Read the rest of this entry »

By on June 28, 2012, 4:00 pm
In category: Albany,Eye on Albany | 10 Comments »

| More

RSS Feed RSS Feed


Gotham Gazette the Place for Politics and Policy

Gotham Gazette is published by Citizens Union Foundation and is made possible by support from the Robert Sterling Clark Foundation, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the Altman Foundation,the Fund for the City of New York and donors to Citizens Union Foundation. Please consider supporting Citizens Union Foundation's public education programs. Critical early support to Gotham Gazette was provided by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

RSS Feed