The Citizen
The Citizen / June 6, 2005

Fines
From El Diario
Street vendors decry excessive fines from police.

Bangladeshi Perfume Shops

From Bangla Patrika
A Bangladeshi immigrant helped hundreds of his countrymen to open perfume shops near the Flower District.

Better Business
From Korea Times New York
Since the beginning of May, many Korean-owned businesses have experienced an increase in demand for their goods because of the better economy.

Irish Bars Closed
From Irish Echo
The wave of return immigration to Ireland has proved a crushing blow to Irish bars.


A tale of immigrant smuggling came to an end last month when a Chinatown businesswoman, Cheng Chui Ping, was convicted on charges of conspiracy, money laundering, and alien smuggling. Ping helped to organize the infamous "Golden Venture" voyage 12 years ago. The freighter, which ran aground off the Rockaways, was packed with 300 illegal immigrants, ten of whom died.

It is not clear that much has changed since then: In 2004, more than 1.1 million people were arrested trying to cross the U.S. border illegally. A new study from the Cato Institute shows that relaxing immigration controls and giving legal status to undocumented immigrants would help secure the country and benefit the economy. The report said that increased border enforcement merely pushes the illegal immigration flow to remote, desert regions and the risks to those crossing are greater.

New York City is just as consistently pro-immigrant. At a gathering of New York's Caribbean and African leaders, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that undocumented immigrants should be able to stay in the country without having to worry about being caught and deported to their homelands.

But the power to change immigration policy belongs to the federal government. Recently, the U.S. Senate introduced legislation that would allow more workers to come to the United States legally and provide current undocumented workers with a path to permanent residency and eventual citizenship.

In this July edition of The Citizen, we take a look at immigrant-owned businesses, political contributions and participation in immigrant communities, a new political asylum rule and a clash over a monument for victims of a concentration camp. Stories from the Bengali, Caribbean, Chinese, Croatian, Korean, Polish, Russian and Spanish-language press via our partner, Voices That Must Be Heard.

Immigrant Drivers Win A Victory
From Gotham Gazette
While the issue is being debated throughout the nation and in Congress, a Manhattan judge has ruled that New York residents cannot be denied driver's licenses based on their immigration status.

Immigration Reform
From Gotham Gazette
The federal government puts immigration reform on its agenda, with three alternative plans.

More Chinese Immigrants File for Political Asylum

From World Journal
An upside of the "Real ID Act" for Chinese immigrants is that it makes applying for political asylum easier. Immigration organizations in Chinatown notice more applications in that category than for work-based permanent residency.

Mayor's Support
From Carib News
Mayor Michael Bloomberg said undocumented immigrants have the right to remain, live and work in the country.

Campaign Contribution
From Korea Times New York
Despite giving large financial contributions to several New York City politicians for their campaign last year, Korean Americans say their voices have fallen on deaf ears.

The Mayor's Press Office
From Russian Bazaar
Mayor Bloomberg's press secretary acknowledged that he does not read ethnic journalism, even when translated into English.

Polish Challenger
From Nowy Dziennik
Andrzej Rasiej, a son of Polish immigrant is running for the office of the Public Advocate

Hispanic Bloc?
From Hoy
"Years ago the Hispanic vote was guaranteed to go to the Democrats,"said an Hoy columnist. "But now the political realities have been changing."

Clash Over Monument
From Croatian Chronicle
Serbians, Croatians and Jews clash over aBrooklyn monument for victims of the Jasenovac concentration camp .

Bollywood on Park Ave.
From Indian Abroad
An award-winning Indian filmmaker said he became a victim of police harassment for shooting video of traffic on Park Avenue.