Gotham Gazette Gotham Gazette is an online publication covering New York policy and politics as well as news on public safety, transportation, education, finance and more. http://www.gothamgazette.com/component/tags/tag/2017 2017-10-23T20:46:21+00:00 Webmaster webmaster@gothamgazette.com Candidates for 2017 City Elections 2016-12-18T05:00:00+00:00 2016-12-18T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6676:candidates-for-2017-city-elections-mayor-city-council-comptroller Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/30865379295_99c046bc9f_z_1.jpg" alt="de blasio voting 2017 elections" width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>Mayor de Blasio signs in to vote (photo: Ed Reed/Mayor's Office)</p> <hr /> <p>With the party primaries over in the 2017 city election cycle, we head toward the general election, which will take place Tuesday, November 7. Dozens of races will be on the ballot, headlined by Mayor Bill de Blasio’s attempt at re-election.</p> <p>The other citywide positions of Public Advocate and Comptroller are also being determined this year, as well as all five Borough Presidents, all 51 City Council seats, and two District Attorney positions (Brooklyn and Manhattan). However, there are several races where the Democratic candidate does not have any general election competition, so those races will not appear on the ballot come November. Some races will be highly competitive, some will have competition in name only.</p> <p>Public Advocate Letitia James and Comptroller Scott Stringer are running for re-election to their posts, as are all five of the other borough presidents -- Queens’ Melinda Katz, Manhattan’s Gale Brewer, Staten Island’s James Oddo, Brooklyn’s Eric Adams, and Ruben Diaz Jr. of the Bronx.</p> <p>In the City Council, 41 members in the 51-seat legislative body are seeking re-election. Most of the 10 "open" seats where the incumbent is not seeking reelection, either due to term limits or other reasons, saw intense competition in the primaries, but have limited contention in the general. Still, there are several interesting Council races to watch heading toward November. All three of the citywide races should also be interesting, though much will depend on how well the Republican and other candidates challenging the Democratic incumbents can do with fundraising and how well they run their campaigns.</p> <p><em>Below is a list of candidates for many city races of 2017. Keep in mind that some candidates will appear on multiple ballot lines, though we will not necessarily list them all.</em></p> <p><em>Gotham Gazette will be editing this list on a running basis leading to Election Day, November 7, as well as adding more to our 2017 election coverage, including more detail about candidates, races, issues, campaign endorsements and fundraising, debates, and more.</em></p> <p>---General election list updated October 3, 2017---<em><br /></em></p> <p><strong>Mayor</strong><br />Bill de Blasio, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Nicole Malliotakis, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Stop de Blasio<br />Bo Dietl, Dump the Mayor<br />Sal Albanese, Reform<br />Aaron Commey, Libertarian<br />Akeem Browder, Green<br />Mike Tolkin, Smart Cities</p> <p><strong>Public Advocate</strong><br />Letitia James, incumbent, Democat &amp; Working Families<br />Juan Carlos "J.C." Polanco, Republican &amp; Reform &amp; Stop de Blasio<br />James Lane, Green<br />Michael O'Reilly, Conservative<br />Devin Balkind, Libertarian</p> <p><strong>Comptroller</strong><br />Scott Stringer, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Michel J. Faulkner, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Reform &amp; Stop de Blasio<br />Alex Merced, Libertarian<br />Julia Willebrand, Green</p> <p><strong>Bronx Borough President<br /></strong>Ruben Diaz, Jr., incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Steven DeMartis, Republican<br />Antonio Vitiello, Conservative<br />Camella Price, Reform</p> <p><strong>Brooklyn Borough President</strong><br />Eric Adams, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Benjamin Kissel, Reform<br />Vito Bruno, Republican &amp; Conservative</p> <p><strong>Queens Borough President</strong><br />Melinda Katz, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />William Kregler, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Everly Brown, Homeowners NYCHA</p> <p><strong>Manhattan Borough President</strong><br />Gale Brewer, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Frank Scala, Republican<br />Daniel Vila Rivera, Green<br />Brian Waddell, Reform &amp; Libertarian&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Staten Island Borough President</strong><br />James Oddo, incumbent, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Reform &amp; Independence<br />Tom Shcherbenko, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Henry Bardel, Green</p> <p><strong>Brooklyn District Attorney</strong><br />Eric Gonzalez, Democrat, incumbent (named acting District Attorney in 2016)<br />Vincent Gentile, Reform</p> <p><strong>Manhattan District Attorney</strong><br />Cy Vance, Democrat, incumbent<br />(Marc Fliedner announced in early October that he's embracing a write-in campaign for Manhattan DA)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 1</strong><br />Margaret Chin, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Bryan Jung, Republican<br />Aaron Foldenauer, Liberal<br />Christoper Marte, Independence</p> <p><strong>City Council District 2 - open seat (held by Rosie Mendez)</strong><br />Carlina Rivera, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Jimmy McMillan, Republican &amp; Rent is 2 Damn High<br />Donald Garrity, Libertarian<br />Manny Cavaco, Green<br />Jasmin Sanchez, Liberal</p> <p><strong>City Council District 3</strong><br />Corey Johnson, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Marni Halasa, Eco Justice</p> <p><strong>City Council District 4 - open seat (held by Dan Garodnick)</strong><br />Keith Powers, Democrat<br />Rebecca Harary, Republican &amp; Women's Equality &amp; Reform &amp; Stop de Blasio<br />Rachel Honig, Liberal</p> <p><strong>City Council District 5</strong><br />Ben Kallos, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Frank Spotorno, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 6</strong><br />Helen Rosenthal, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Hyman Drusin, Republican<br />William Raudenbush, Stand Up Together</p> <p><strong>City Council District 7</strong><br />Mark Levine, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Florindo Troncelliti, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 8 - open seat (held by Melissa Mark-Viverito)</strong><br />Diana Ayala, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Daby Carreras, Republican &amp; Reform &amp; Stop de Blasio &amp; No Rezoning 4 Ever<br />Linda Ortiz, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 9</strong><br />Bill Perkins, incumbent (elected in February special election), Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Jack Royster, Republican<br />Pierre Gooding, Reform<br />Tyson-Lord Gray, Liberal<br />Dianne Mack, Harlem Matters</p> <p><strong>City Council District 10</strong><br />Ydanis Rodriguez, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Ronny Goodman, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 11</strong><br />Andrew Cohen, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Judah David Powers, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Roxanne Delgado, Animal Rights</p> <p><strong>City Council District 12</strong><br />Andy King, incumbent, Democrat<br />Adrienne Erwin, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 13 - open seat (held by James Vacca)</strong><br />Mark Gjonaj, Democrat<br />John Cerini, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Marjorie Velazquez, Working Families<br />John Doyle, Liberal<br />Alex Gomez, New Bronx</p> <p><strong>City Council District 14</strong><br />Fernando Cabrera, incumbent, Democrat<br />Randy Abreu, Working Families<br />Alan Reed, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Justin Sanchez, Liberal</p> <p><strong>City Council District 15</strong><br />Ritchie Torres, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Jayson Cancel, Jr., Republican &amp; Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 16</strong><br />Vanessa Gibson, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Benjamin Eggleston, Republican &amp; Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 17</strong><br />Rafael Salamanca, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Patrick Delices, Republican<br />Oswald Denis, Conservative<br />Elvis Santana, Empower Society</p> <p><strong>City Council District 18 - open seat (held by Annabel Palma)</strong><br />Ruben Diaz, Sr., Democrat<br />Carl Lundgren, Green<br />Michael Beltzer, Liberal<br />William Russell Moore, Reform<br />Eduadro Ramirez, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 19</strong><br />Paul Vallone, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Konstantinos Poulidis, Republican<br />Paul Graziano, Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 20</strong><br />Peter Koo, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 21 - open seat (held by Julissa Ferreras-Copeland)</strong><br />Francisco Moya, Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 22</strong><br />Costa Constantinides, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Kathleen Springer, Dive In</p> <p><strong>City Council District 23</strong><br />Barry Grodenchik, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Joseph Concannon, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Stop de Blasio<br />John Y. Lim, John Y. Lim</p> <p><strong>City Council District 24</strong><br />Rory Lancman, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Mohammad Rahman, Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 25</strong><br />Daniel Dromm, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 26<br /></strong>Jimmy Van Bramer, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Marvin Jeffcoat, Republican &amp; Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 27</strong><br />I. Daneek Miller, Democrat, incumbent<br />Rupert Green, Republican<br />Frank Francois, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 28 - open seat (Ruben Wills was convicted on public corruption charges)</strong><br />Adrienne Adams, Democrat<br />Ivan Mossop, Republican<br />Hettie Powell, Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 29</strong><br />Karen Koslowitz, incumbent,&nbsp;Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 30</strong><br />Elizabeth Crowley, incumbent,&nbsp;Democrat &amp; Working Families &amp; Women's Equality<br />Robert Holden, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Reform &amp; Dump de Blasio</p> <p><strong>City Council District 31</strong><br />Donovan Richards, incumbent,&nbsp;Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 32</strong><br />Eric Ulrich, incumbent, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Independence &amp; Reform<br />Mike Scala, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 33</strong><br />Stephen Levin, Democrat, incumbent<br />Victoria Cambranes, Progress for All</p> <p><strong>City Council District 34</strong><br />Antonio Reynoso, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 35</strong><br />Laurie Cumbo, Democrat, incumbent<br />Jabari Brisport, Green &amp; Socialist<br />Christine Parker, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 36</strong><br />Robert Cornegy, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 37</strong><br />Rafael Espinal, Democrat, incumbent<br />Persephone Sarah Jane Smith, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 38</strong><br />Carlos Menchaca, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Carmen Hulbert, Green<br />Devlis Valdez, Reform<br />Allan Romaguera, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 39</strong><br />Brad Lander, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 40</strong><br />Mathieu Eugene, Democrat, incumbent<br />Brian Cunningham, Reform<br />Brian Kelly, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 41 - open seat (held by Darlene Mealy)</strong><br />Alicka Ampry-Samuel, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Berneda Jackson, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Christoper Carew, Solutions</p> <p><strong>City Council District 42</strong><br />Inez Barron, Democrat, incumbent<br />Ernest Johnson, Conservative<br />Mawuli Hormeku, Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 43 - open seat (held by Vincent Gentile)</strong><br />John Quaglione, Republican &amp; Independence &amp; Conservative<br />Justin Brannan, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Angel Medina, Women's Equality<br />Bob Capano, Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 44 - open seat (held by David Greenfield, who is not seeking reelection)</strong><br />Kalman Yeger, Democrat &amp; Conservative<br />Yoni Hikind, Our Neighborhood<br />Harold Tischler, School Choice</p> <p><strong>City Council District 45</strong><br />Jumaane Williams, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Anthony Beckford, True Freedom</p> <p><strong>City Council District 46</strong><br />Alan Maisel, Democrat, incumbent<br />Jeffrey Ferretti, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 47</strong><br />Mark Treyger, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Raimondo Denaro, Republican &amp; Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 48</strong><br />Chaim M. Deutsch, Democrat, incumbent<br />Steven Saperstein, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 49</strong><br />Deborah Rose, incumbent,&nbsp;Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Michael Penrose, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Kamillah Hanks, Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 50</strong><br />Steven Matteo, incumbent,&nbsp;Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Independence &amp; Reform<br />Richard Florentino, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 51</strong><br />Joseph Borelli, incumbent,&nbsp;Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Independence &amp; Reform<br />Dylan Schwartz, Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p>*************</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;">****THE BELOW WAS WRITTEN AHEAD OF THE SEPTEMBER 12 PRIMARY ELECTIONS****</p> <p>With the 2016 elections behind us and 2017 here, the focus in New York City is turning to this year's city election cycle. There will be dozens of races on the ballot for primaries in September and the general election in November, including Mayor Bill de Blasio’s attempt at re-election.</p> <p>The other citywide positions of Public Advocate and Comptroller will also be voted on, as well as all five Borough Presidents, all 51 City Council seats, and two District Attorney positions (Brooklyn and Manhattan).</p> <p>Candidates continue to declare their intentions to run and file with the state Board of Elections and city Campaign Finance Board. While filing a campaign committee with the Campaign Finance Board happens on a rolling basis, the most recent filing deadline for financial disclosures was mid-August. Candidates have had to submit ballot petitioning signatures to the Board of Elections, with some candidates then not making the ballot.</p> <p>Public Advocate Letitia James and Comptroller Scott Stringer are running for re-election to their posts, as are all five of the other borough presidents -- Queens’ Melinda Katz, Manhattan’s Gale Brewer, Staten Island’s James Oddo, Brooklyn’s Eric Adams, and Ruben Diaz Jr. of the Bronx.</p> <p>In the City Council, there are just seven of the 51 members who are term-limited from running for re-election. One now former Council member, Inez Dickens, was recently elected to the state Assembly and State Senator Bill Perkins was elected to the vacant seat in a special election -- Perkins is seeking reelection. There are several current state legislators running for City Council seats and one, Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, who is the presumptive Republican nominee for mayor. Additionally, City Council Members Julissa Ferreras-Copeland and David Greenfield have decided not to run for reelection, so their seats have become "open," as has the seat formerly held by Ruben Wills, who was convicted on public corruption charges.</p> <p>While a few City Council incumbents are facing tough challengers, there will be relatively limited action in City Council races beyond the 10 "open" seats where the current officeholder is term-limited or not seeking reelection. The competition in several of those seats looks like it will be fierce, and there will be several serious races where incumbents are trying to hold on.</p> <p><em>Below is a running list of official and rumored candidates for many city races of 2017. Gotham Gazette will be editing this list on a running basis, as well as adding more to our 2017 election coverage, including more detail about candidates, races, issues, campaign endorsements and fundraising, debates, and more. [Note: not listed in this post are offices on the ballot including District Leader, County Committee, and other hyper-local races.]</em></p> <p>---Candidate list last updated August 20, 2017---<em><br /></em></p> <p><strong>Mayor</strong><br />Bill de Blasio, Democrat, incumbent<br />Sal Albanese, Democrat<br />Robert Gangi, Democrat<br />Michael Tolkin, Democrat<br />Richard Bashner, Democrat</p> <p>Nicole Malliotakis, Republican</p> <p>Richard “Bo” Dietl, independent<br />Aaron Commey, Libertarian<br />Akeem Browder, Green</p> <p>Abbey Laurel-Smith, Pilgrims Alliance<br />Garrett Bowser, independent<br />Eric W. Armstead, independent<br />Ahsan Syed, Theocratic<br />Robbie Gosine, independent<br />Asim Deen (party TBD)<br />Scott Joyner (party TBD)<br />Eric Roman (party TBD)<br />Rosemary Hameed (party TBD)<br />James Berry (party TBD)<br />Salvador Morales, (party TBD)<br />Louis Puliafito, (party TBD)<br />Eliseo Santos, (party TBD)<br />Karmen Smith, (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>Public Advocate</strong><br />Letitia James, Democrat, incumbent<br />David Eisenbach, Democrat &amp; Liberal<br />J.C. Polanco, Republican<br />James Lane, Green<br />Michael O'Reilly, Conservative<br />Devin Balkind, Libertarian<br />Cardon Pompey (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>Comptroller</strong><br />Scott Stringer, Democrat, incumbent<br />Michel J. Faulkner, Republican<br />Alex Merced, Libertarian<br />Julia Willebrand, Green</p> <p><strong>Bronx Borough President<br /></strong>Ruben Diaz, Jr., Democrat, incumbent<br />Camella Pinkney-Price, Democrat<br />Avery Selkridge, Democrat<br />Michael Garcia (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>Brooklyn Borough President</strong><br />Eric Adams, Democrat, incumbent<br />Ben Kissel, Reform &amp; Libertarian<br />Vito Bruno, Republican</p> <p><strong>Queens Borough President</strong><br />Melinda Katz, Democrat, incumbent<br />William Kregler, Republican</p> <p><strong>Manhattan Borough President</strong><br />Gale Brewer, Democrat, incumbent<br />Brian Waddell, Libertarian<br />Daniel Vila, Green<br />Linda Liu (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>Staten Island Borough President</strong><br />James Oddo, Republican, incumbent<br />Tom Shcherbenko, Democrat<br />Henry Bardel, Green</p> <p><strong>Brooklyn District Attorney</strong><br />Eric Gonzalez, Democrat, incumbent (named acting District Attorney in 2016)<br />Patricia Gatling, Democrat<br />Vincent Gentile, Democrat<br />Stephanie Ama-Dwimoh, Democrat<br />Marc Fliedner, Democrat<br />Anne Swern, Democrat</p> <p><strong>Manhattan District Attorney</strong><br />Cy Vance, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 1</strong><br />Margaret Chin, Democrat, incumbent<br />Christopher Marte, Democrat<br />Aaron Foldenauer, Democrat<br />Dashia Imperiale, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 2 - open seat (held by Rosie Mendez)</strong><br />Carlina Rivera, Democrat<br />Mary Silver, Democrat<br />Jasmin Sanchez, Democrat<br />Ronnie Cho, Democrat<br />Jorge Vasquez, Democrat<br />Erin Hussein, Democrat<br />Jimmy McMillan, Republican &amp; Rent is Too Damn High<br />Donald Garrity, Libertarian<br />Manny Cavaco, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 3</strong><br />Corey Johnson, Democrat, incumbent<br />Marni Halasa, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 4 - open seat (held by Dan Garodnick)</strong><br />Jeffrey Mailman, Democrat<br />Keith Powers, Democrat<br />Bessie R. Schachter, Democrat<br />Martha Speranza, Democrat<br />Maria Castro, Democrat<br />Vanessa Aronson, Democrat<br />Barry Shapiro, Democrat<br />Rachel Honig, Democrat<br />Alec Hartman, Democrat<br />Rebecca Harary, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 5</strong><br />Ben Kallos, Democrat, incumbent<br />Patrick Bobilin, Democrat<br />Gwen Goodwin, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 6</strong><br />Helen Rosenthal, Democrat, incumbent<br />Cary Goodman, Democrat<br />Mel Wymore, Democrat<br />David Owens (party TBD)<br />William Raudenbush (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 7</strong><br />Mark Levine, Democrat, incumbent<br />Thomas Lopez-Pierre, Democrat<br />Florindo Troncelliti, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 8 - open seat (held by Melissa Mark-Viverito)</strong><br />Diana Ayala, Democrat<br />Tamika Mapp, Democrat<br />Robert Rodriguez, Democrat<br />Israel Martinez, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 9</strong><br />Bill Perkins, Democrat, incumbent (elected in February special election)<br />Marvin Holland, Democrat<br />Marvin Spruill, Democrat<br />Tyson Lord-Gray, Democrat<br />Cordell Cleare, Democrat<br />Julius Tajiddin, Democrat<br />Jack Royster, Republican<br />Pierre Gooding, Libertarian</p> <p><strong>City Council District 10</strong><br />Ydanis Rodriguez, Democrat, incumbent<br />Josue Perez, Democrat<br />Francesca Castellanos<br />Gregory Purdy, Republican<br />Anthony del Orbe (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 11</strong><br />Andrew Cohen, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 12</strong><br />Andy King, Democrat, incumbent<br />Pamela Hamilton-Johnson, Democrat<br />Karrée-Lyn Gordon, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 13 - open seat (held by James Vacca)</strong><br />John C. Doyle, Democrat<br />Mark Gjonaj, Democrat<br />Marjorie Velazquez, Democrat<br />Egidio Sementilli, Democrat<br />John Cerini, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 14</strong><br />Fernando Cabrera, Democrat, incumbent<br />Randy Abreu, Democrat<br />Felix Perdomo, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 15</strong><br />Ritchie Torres, Democrat, incumbent<br />Jayson Cancel, Jr., Martial Arts Party</p> <p><strong>City Council District 16</strong><br />Vanessa Gibson, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 17</strong><br />Rafael Salamanca, Democrat, incumbent<br />Helen Foreman-Hines, Democrat<br />Patrick Delices, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 18 - open seat (held by Annabel Palma)</strong><br />Amanda Farias, Democrat<br />Elvin Garcia, Democrat<br />Michael Beltzer, Democrat<br />Ruben Diaz, Sr., Democrat<br />William Moore, Democrat<br />Carl Lundgren, Green<br />Eisley Constantine, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 19</strong><br />Paul Vallone, Democrat, incumbent<br />Paul Graziano, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 20</strong><br />Peter Koo, Democrat, incumbent<br />Alison Tan, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 21 - open seat (held by Julissa Ferreras-Copeland)</strong><br />Hiram Monserrate, Democrat<br />Francisco Moya, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 22</strong><br />Costa Constantinides, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 23</strong><br />Barry Grodenchik, Democrat, incumbent<br />Benny Itteera, Democrat<br />Joseph Concannon, Republican<br />John Lim (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 24</strong><br />Rory Lancman, Democrat, incumbent<br />Mohammad Rahman, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 25</strong><br />Daniel Dromm, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 26<br /></strong>Jimmy Van Bramer, Democrat, incumbent<br />Marvin Jeffcoat, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 27</strong><br />I. Daneek Miller, Democrat, incumbent<br />Anthony Rivers, Democrat<br />Rupert Green, Republican<br />Frank Francois, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 28 - open seat (Ruben Wills was convicted on public corruption charges)</strong><br />Adrienne Adams, Democrat<br />Richard David, Democrat<br />Hettie V. Powell, Democrat<br />Ivan Mossop, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 29</strong><br />Karen Koslowitz, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 30</strong><br />Elizabeth Crowley, Democrat, incumbent<br />Robert Holden, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 31</strong><br />Donovan Richards, Democrat, incumbent<br />Derek Hamilton (party TBD)<br />Latanya Collins (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 32</strong><br />Eric Ulrich, Republican, incumbent<br />Mike Scala, Democrat<br />Helal Sheikh, Democrat<br />William Ruiz, Democrat<br />Jay Rivera (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 33</strong><br />Stephen Levin, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 34</strong><br />Antonio Reynoso, Democrat, incumbent<br />Tommy Torres, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 35</strong><br />Laurie Cumbo, Democrat, incumbent<br />Ede Fox, Democrat<br />Jabari Brisport, Green<br />Scott Hutchins, Green<br />Christine Parker, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 36</strong><br />Robert Cornegy, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 37</strong><br />Rafael Espinal, Democrat, incumbent<br />Persephone Sarah Jane Smith, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 38</strong><br />Carlos Menchaca, Democrat, incumbent<br />Delvis Valdes, Democrat<br />Sara Gonzalez, Democrat<br />Felix Ortiz, Democrat<br />Chris Miao, Democrat<br />Carmen Hulbert, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 39</strong><br />Brad Lander, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 40</strong><br />Mathieu Eugene, Democrat, incumbent<br />Brian Cunningham, Democrat<br />Pia Raymond, Democrat<br />Jennifer Berkley, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 41 - open seat (held by Darlene Mealy)</strong><br />Moreen King, Democrat<br />Deidre Olivera, Democrat<br />Cory Provost, Democrat<br />Henry Butler, Democrat<br />Alicka Ampry-Samuel, Democrat<br />David Miller, Democrat<br />Leopold Cox, Democrat<br />Royston Antoine, Democrat<br />Victor Jordan, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 42</strong><br />Inez Barron, Democrat, incumbent<br />Mawuli Hormeku, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 43 - open seat (held by Vincent Gentile)</strong><br />Bob Capano, Republican<br />Liam McCabe, Republican<br />John Quaglione, Republican<br />Lucretia Regina-Potter, Republican<br />Justin Brannan, Democrat<br />Kevin Peter Carroll, Democrat<br />Nancy Tong, Democrat<br />Khader El-Yateem, Democrat<br />Vincenzo Chirico, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 44 - open seat (held by David Greenfield, who is not seeking reelection)</strong><br />Kalman Yeger, Democrat<br />Yoni Hikind, Our Neighborhood</p> <p><strong>City Council District 45</strong><br />Jumaane Williams, Democrat, incumbent<br />Louis Cespedes, Democrat<br />Anthony Beckford, Green<br />Stanley Dumas (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 46</strong><br />Alan Maisel, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 47</strong><br />Mark Treyger, Democrat, incumbent<br />Raimondo Denaro, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 48</strong><br />Chaim M. Deutsch, Democrat, incumbent<br />Marat Filler, Democrat<br />Steven Saperstein, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 49</strong><br />Debi Rose, Democrat, incumbent<br />Kamillah Payne-Hanks, Democrat<br />Michael Penrose, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 50</strong><br />Steven Matteo, Republican, incumbent<br />Richard Florentino, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 51</strong><br />Joe Borelli, Republican, incumbent<br />Dylan Schwartz, Democrat</p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Brendan Birth contributed to this article.</p> <p><a href="http://vote.nyc.ny.us/downloads/pdf/documents/boe/2017PrimaryElection/PrimaryContestList_8_9.2017RW2.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Official Board of Elections primary listing.</a></p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/30865379295_99c046bc9f_z_1.jpg" alt="de blasio voting 2017 elections" width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>Mayor de Blasio signs in to vote (photo: Ed Reed/Mayor's Office)</p> <hr /> <p>With the party primaries over in the 2017 city election cycle, we head toward the general election, which will take place Tuesday, November 7. Dozens of races will be on the ballot, headlined by Mayor Bill de Blasio’s attempt at re-election.</p> <p>The other citywide positions of Public Advocate and Comptroller are also being determined this year, as well as all five Borough Presidents, all 51 City Council seats, and two District Attorney positions (Brooklyn and Manhattan). However, there are several races where the Democratic candidate does not have any general election competition, so those races will not appear on the ballot come November. Some races will be highly competitive, some will have competition in name only.</p> <p>Public Advocate Letitia James and Comptroller Scott Stringer are running for re-election to their posts, as are all five of the other borough presidents -- Queens’ Melinda Katz, Manhattan’s Gale Brewer, Staten Island’s James Oddo, Brooklyn’s Eric Adams, and Ruben Diaz Jr. of the Bronx.</p> <p>In the City Council, 41 members in the 51-seat legislative body are seeking re-election. Most of the 10 "open" seats where the incumbent is not seeking reelection, either due to term limits or other reasons, saw intense competition in the primaries, but have limited contention in the general. Still, there are several interesting Council races to watch heading toward November. All three of the citywide races should also be interesting, though much will depend on how well the Republican and other candidates challenging the Democratic incumbents can do with fundraising and how well they run their campaigns.</p> <p><em>Below is a list of candidates for many city races of 2017. Keep in mind that some candidates will appear on multiple ballot lines, though we will not necessarily list them all.</em></p> <p><em>Gotham Gazette will be editing this list on a running basis leading to Election Day, November 7, as well as adding more to our 2017 election coverage, including more detail about candidates, races, issues, campaign endorsements and fundraising, debates, and more.</em></p> <p>---General election list updated October 3, 2017---<em><br /></em></p> <p><strong>Mayor</strong><br />Bill de Blasio, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Nicole Malliotakis, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Stop de Blasio<br />Bo Dietl, Dump the Mayor<br />Sal Albanese, Reform<br />Aaron Commey, Libertarian<br />Akeem Browder, Green<br />Mike Tolkin, Smart Cities</p> <p><strong>Public Advocate</strong><br />Letitia James, incumbent, Democat &amp; Working Families<br />Juan Carlos "J.C." Polanco, Republican &amp; Reform &amp; Stop de Blasio<br />James Lane, Green<br />Michael O'Reilly, Conservative<br />Devin Balkind, Libertarian</p> <p><strong>Comptroller</strong><br />Scott Stringer, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Michel J. Faulkner, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Reform &amp; Stop de Blasio<br />Alex Merced, Libertarian<br />Julia Willebrand, Green</p> <p><strong>Bronx Borough President<br /></strong>Ruben Diaz, Jr., incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Steven DeMartis, Republican<br />Antonio Vitiello, Conservative<br />Camella Price, Reform</p> <p><strong>Brooklyn Borough President</strong><br />Eric Adams, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Benjamin Kissel, Reform<br />Vito Bruno, Republican &amp; Conservative</p> <p><strong>Queens Borough President</strong><br />Melinda Katz, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />William Kregler, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Everly Brown, Homeowners NYCHA</p> <p><strong>Manhattan Borough President</strong><br />Gale Brewer, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Frank Scala, Republican<br />Daniel Vila Rivera, Green<br />Brian Waddell, Reform &amp; Libertarian&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Staten Island Borough President</strong><br />James Oddo, incumbent, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Reform &amp; Independence<br />Tom Shcherbenko, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Henry Bardel, Green</p> <p><strong>Brooklyn District Attorney</strong><br />Eric Gonzalez, Democrat, incumbent (named acting District Attorney in 2016)<br />Vincent Gentile, Reform</p> <p><strong>Manhattan District Attorney</strong><br />Cy Vance, Democrat, incumbent<br />(Marc Fliedner announced in early October that he's embracing a write-in campaign for Manhattan DA)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 1</strong><br />Margaret Chin, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Bryan Jung, Republican<br />Aaron Foldenauer, Liberal<br />Christoper Marte, Independence</p> <p><strong>City Council District 2 - open seat (held by Rosie Mendez)</strong><br />Carlina Rivera, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Jimmy McMillan, Republican &amp; Rent is 2 Damn High<br />Donald Garrity, Libertarian<br />Manny Cavaco, Green<br />Jasmin Sanchez, Liberal</p> <p><strong>City Council District 3</strong><br />Corey Johnson, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Marni Halasa, Eco Justice</p> <p><strong>City Council District 4 - open seat (held by Dan Garodnick)</strong><br />Keith Powers, Democrat<br />Rebecca Harary, Republican &amp; Women's Equality &amp; Reform &amp; Stop de Blasio<br />Rachel Honig, Liberal</p> <p><strong>City Council District 5</strong><br />Ben Kallos, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Frank Spotorno, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 6</strong><br />Helen Rosenthal, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Hyman Drusin, Republican<br />William Raudenbush, Stand Up Together</p> <p><strong>City Council District 7</strong><br />Mark Levine, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Florindo Troncelliti, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 8 - open seat (held by Melissa Mark-Viverito)</strong><br />Diana Ayala, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Daby Carreras, Republican &amp; Reform &amp; Stop de Blasio &amp; No Rezoning 4 Ever<br />Linda Ortiz, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 9</strong><br />Bill Perkins, incumbent (elected in February special election), Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Jack Royster, Republican<br />Pierre Gooding, Reform<br />Tyson-Lord Gray, Liberal<br />Dianne Mack, Harlem Matters</p> <p><strong>City Council District 10</strong><br />Ydanis Rodriguez, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Ronny Goodman, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 11</strong><br />Andrew Cohen, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Judah David Powers, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Roxanne Delgado, Animal Rights</p> <p><strong>City Council District 12</strong><br />Andy King, incumbent, Democrat<br />Adrienne Erwin, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 13 - open seat (held by James Vacca)</strong><br />Mark Gjonaj, Democrat<br />John Cerini, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Marjorie Velazquez, Working Families<br />John Doyle, Liberal<br />Alex Gomez, New Bronx</p> <p><strong>City Council District 14</strong><br />Fernando Cabrera, incumbent, Democrat<br />Randy Abreu, Working Families<br />Alan Reed, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Justin Sanchez, Liberal</p> <p><strong>City Council District 15</strong><br />Ritchie Torres, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Jayson Cancel, Jr., Republican &amp; Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 16</strong><br />Vanessa Gibson, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Benjamin Eggleston, Republican &amp; Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 17</strong><br />Rafael Salamanca, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Patrick Delices, Republican<br />Oswald Denis, Conservative<br />Elvis Santana, Empower Society</p> <p><strong>City Council District 18 - open seat (held by Annabel Palma)</strong><br />Ruben Diaz, Sr., Democrat<br />Carl Lundgren, Green<br />Michael Beltzer, Liberal<br />William Russell Moore, Reform<br />Eduadro Ramirez, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 19</strong><br />Paul Vallone, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Konstantinos Poulidis, Republican<br />Paul Graziano, Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 20</strong><br />Peter Koo, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 21 - open seat (held by Julissa Ferreras-Copeland)</strong><br />Francisco Moya, Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 22</strong><br />Costa Constantinides, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Kathleen Springer, Dive In</p> <p><strong>City Council District 23</strong><br />Barry Grodenchik, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Joseph Concannon, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Stop de Blasio<br />John Y. Lim, John Y. Lim</p> <p><strong>City Council District 24</strong><br />Rory Lancman, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Mohammad Rahman, Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 25</strong><br />Daniel Dromm, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 26<br /></strong>Jimmy Van Bramer, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Marvin Jeffcoat, Republican &amp; Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 27</strong><br />I. Daneek Miller, Democrat, incumbent<br />Rupert Green, Republican<br />Frank Francois, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 28 - open seat (Ruben Wills was convicted on public corruption charges)</strong><br />Adrienne Adams, Democrat<br />Ivan Mossop, Republican<br />Hettie Powell, Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 29</strong><br />Karen Koslowitz, incumbent,&nbsp;Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 30</strong><br />Elizabeth Crowley, incumbent,&nbsp;Democrat &amp; Working Families &amp; Women's Equality<br />Robert Holden, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Reform &amp; Dump de Blasio</p> <p><strong>City Council District 31</strong><br />Donovan Richards, incumbent,&nbsp;Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 32</strong><br />Eric Ulrich, incumbent, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Independence &amp; Reform<br />Mike Scala, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 33</strong><br />Stephen Levin, Democrat, incumbent<br />Victoria Cambranes, Progress for All</p> <p><strong>City Council District 34</strong><br />Antonio Reynoso, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 35</strong><br />Laurie Cumbo, Democrat, incumbent<br />Jabari Brisport, Green &amp; Socialist<br />Christine Parker, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 36</strong><br />Robert Cornegy, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 37</strong><br />Rafael Espinal, Democrat, incumbent<br />Persephone Sarah Jane Smith, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 38</strong><br />Carlos Menchaca, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Carmen Hulbert, Green<br />Devlis Valdez, Reform<br />Allan Romaguera, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 39</strong><br />Brad Lander, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p><strong>City Council District 40</strong><br />Mathieu Eugene, Democrat, incumbent<br />Brian Cunningham, Reform<br />Brian Kelly, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 41 - open seat (held by Darlene Mealy)</strong><br />Alicka Ampry-Samuel, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Berneda Jackson, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Christoper Carew, Solutions</p> <p><strong>City Council District 42</strong><br />Inez Barron, Democrat, incumbent<br />Ernest Johnson, Conservative<br />Mawuli Hormeku, Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 43 - open seat (held by Vincent Gentile)</strong><br />John Quaglione, Republican &amp; Independence &amp; Conservative<br />Justin Brannan, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Angel Medina, Women's Equality<br />Bob Capano, Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 44 - open seat (held by David Greenfield, who is not seeking reelection)</strong><br />Kalman Yeger, Democrat &amp; Conservative<br />Yoni Hikind, Our Neighborhood<br />Harold Tischler, School Choice</p> <p><strong>City Council District 45</strong><br />Jumaane Williams, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Anthony Beckford, True Freedom</p> <p><strong>City Council District 46</strong><br />Alan Maisel, Democrat, incumbent<br />Jeffrey Ferretti, Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 47</strong><br />Mark Treyger, incumbent, Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Raimondo Denaro, Republican &amp; Conservative</p> <p><strong>City Council District 48</strong><br />Chaim M. Deutsch, Democrat, incumbent<br />Steven Saperstein, Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 49</strong><br />Deborah Rose, incumbent,&nbsp;Democrat &amp; Working Families<br />Michael Penrose, Republican &amp; Conservative<br />Kamillah Hanks, Reform</p> <p><strong>City Council District 50</strong><br />Steven Matteo, incumbent,&nbsp;Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Independence &amp; Reform<br />Richard Florentino, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 51</strong><br />Joseph Borelli, incumbent,&nbsp;Republican &amp; Conservative &amp; Independence &amp; Reform<br />Dylan Schwartz, Democrat &amp; Working Families</p> <p>*************</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;">****THE BELOW WAS WRITTEN AHEAD OF THE SEPTEMBER 12 PRIMARY ELECTIONS****</p> <p>With the 2016 elections behind us and 2017 here, the focus in New York City is turning to this year's city election cycle. There will be dozens of races on the ballot for primaries in September and the general election in November, including Mayor Bill de Blasio’s attempt at re-election.</p> <p>The other citywide positions of Public Advocate and Comptroller will also be voted on, as well as all five Borough Presidents, all 51 City Council seats, and two District Attorney positions (Brooklyn and Manhattan).</p> <p>Candidates continue to declare their intentions to run and file with the state Board of Elections and city Campaign Finance Board. While filing a campaign committee with the Campaign Finance Board happens on a rolling basis, the most recent filing deadline for financial disclosures was mid-August. Candidates have had to submit ballot petitioning signatures to the Board of Elections, with some candidates then not making the ballot.</p> <p>Public Advocate Letitia James and Comptroller Scott Stringer are running for re-election to their posts, as are all five of the other borough presidents -- Queens’ Melinda Katz, Manhattan’s Gale Brewer, Staten Island’s James Oddo, Brooklyn’s Eric Adams, and Ruben Diaz Jr. of the Bronx.</p> <p>In the City Council, there are just seven of the 51 members who are term-limited from running for re-election. One now former Council member, Inez Dickens, was recently elected to the state Assembly and State Senator Bill Perkins was elected to the vacant seat in a special election -- Perkins is seeking reelection. There are several current state legislators running for City Council seats and one, Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, who is the presumptive Republican nominee for mayor. Additionally, City Council Members Julissa Ferreras-Copeland and David Greenfield have decided not to run for reelection, so their seats have become "open," as has the seat formerly held by Ruben Wills, who was convicted on public corruption charges.</p> <p>While a few City Council incumbents are facing tough challengers, there will be relatively limited action in City Council races beyond the 10 "open" seats where the current officeholder is term-limited or not seeking reelection. The competition in several of those seats looks like it will be fierce, and there will be several serious races where incumbents are trying to hold on.</p> <p><em>Below is a running list of official and rumored candidates for many city races of 2017. Gotham Gazette will be editing this list on a running basis, as well as adding more to our 2017 election coverage, including more detail about candidates, races, issues, campaign endorsements and fundraising, debates, and more. [Note: not listed in this post are offices on the ballot including District Leader, County Committee, and other hyper-local races.]</em></p> <p>---Candidate list last updated August 20, 2017---<em><br /></em></p> <p><strong>Mayor</strong><br />Bill de Blasio, Democrat, incumbent<br />Sal Albanese, Democrat<br />Robert Gangi, Democrat<br />Michael Tolkin, Democrat<br />Richard Bashner, Democrat</p> <p>Nicole Malliotakis, Republican</p> <p>Richard “Bo” Dietl, independent<br />Aaron Commey, Libertarian<br />Akeem Browder, Green</p> <p>Abbey Laurel-Smith, Pilgrims Alliance<br />Garrett Bowser, independent<br />Eric W. Armstead, independent<br />Ahsan Syed, Theocratic<br />Robbie Gosine, independent<br />Asim Deen (party TBD)<br />Scott Joyner (party TBD)<br />Eric Roman (party TBD)<br />Rosemary Hameed (party TBD)<br />James Berry (party TBD)<br />Salvador Morales, (party TBD)<br />Louis Puliafito, (party TBD)<br />Eliseo Santos, (party TBD)<br />Karmen Smith, (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>Public Advocate</strong><br />Letitia James, Democrat, incumbent<br />David Eisenbach, Democrat &amp; Liberal<br />J.C. Polanco, Republican<br />James Lane, Green<br />Michael O'Reilly, Conservative<br />Devin Balkind, Libertarian<br />Cardon Pompey (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>Comptroller</strong><br />Scott Stringer, Democrat, incumbent<br />Michel J. Faulkner, Republican<br />Alex Merced, Libertarian<br />Julia Willebrand, Green</p> <p><strong>Bronx Borough President<br /></strong>Ruben Diaz, Jr., Democrat, incumbent<br />Camella Pinkney-Price, Democrat<br />Avery Selkridge, Democrat<br />Michael Garcia (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>Brooklyn Borough President</strong><br />Eric Adams, Democrat, incumbent<br />Ben Kissel, Reform &amp; Libertarian<br />Vito Bruno, Republican</p> <p><strong>Queens Borough President</strong><br />Melinda Katz, Democrat, incumbent<br />William Kregler, Republican</p> <p><strong>Manhattan Borough President</strong><br />Gale Brewer, Democrat, incumbent<br />Brian Waddell, Libertarian<br />Daniel Vila, Green<br />Linda Liu (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>Staten Island Borough President</strong><br />James Oddo, Republican, incumbent<br />Tom Shcherbenko, Democrat<br />Henry Bardel, Green</p> <p><strong>Brooklyn District Attorney</strong><br />Eric Gonzalez, Democrat, incumbent (named acting District Attorney in 2016)<br />Patricia Gatling, Democrat<br />Vincent Gentile, Democrat<br />Stephanie Ama-Dwimoh, Democrat<br />Marc Fliedner, Democrat<br />Anne Swern, Democrat</p> <p><strong>Manhattan District Attorney</strong><br />Cy Vance, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 1</strong><br />Margaret Chin, Democrat, incumbent<br />Christopher Marte, Democrat<br />Aaron Foldenauer, Democrat<br />Dashia Imperiale, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 2 - open seat (held by Rosie Mendez)</strong><br />Carlina Rivera, Democrat<br />Mary Silver, Democrat<br />Jasmin Sanchez, Democrat<br />Ronnie Cho, Democrat<br />Jorge Vasquez, Democrat<br />Erin Hussein, Democrat<br />Jimmy McMillan, Republican &amp; Rent is Too Damn High<br />Donald Garrity, Libertarian<br />Manny Cavaco, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 3</strong><br />Corey Johnson, Democrat, incumbent<br />Marni Halasa, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 4 - open seat (held by Dan Garodnick)</strong><br />Jeffrey Mailman, Democrat<br />Keith Powers, Democrat<br />Bessie R. Schachter, Democrat<br />Martha Speranza, Democrat<br />Maria Castro, Democrat<br />Vanessa Aronson, Democrat<br />Barry Shapiro, Democrat<br />Rachel Honig, Democrat<br />Alec Hartman, Democrat<br />Rebecca Harary, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 5</strong><br />Ben Kallos, Democrat, incumbent<br />Patrick Bobilin, Democrat<br />Gwen Goodwin, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 6</strong><br />Helen Rosenthal, Democrat, incumbent<br />Cary Goodman, Democrat<br />Mel Wymore, Democrat<br />David Owens (party TBD)<br />William Raudenbush (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 7</strong><br />Mark Levine, Democrat, incumbent<br />Thomas Lopez-Pierre, Democrat<br />Florindo Troncelliti, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 8 - open seat (held by Melissa Mark-Viverito)</strong><br />Diana Ayala, Democrat<br />Tamika Mapp, Democrat<br />Robert Rodriguez, Democrat<br />Israel Martinez, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 9</strong><br />Bill Perkins, Democrat, incumbent (elected in February special election)<br />Marvin Holland, Democrat<br />Marvin Spruill, Democrat<br />Tyson Lord-Gray, Democrat<br />Cordell Cleare, Democrat<br />Julius Tajiddin, Democrat<br />Jack Royster, Republican<br />Pierre Gooding, Libertarian</p> <p><strong>City Council District 10</strong><br />Ydanis Rodriguez, Democrat, incumbent<br />Josue Perez, Democrat<br />Francesca Castellanos<br />Gregory Purdy, Republican<br />Anthony del Orbe (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 11</strong><br />Andrew Cohen, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 12</strong><br />Andy King, Democrat, incumbent<br />Pamela Hamilton-Johnson, Democrat<br />Karrée-Lyn Gordon, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 13 - open seat (held by James Vacca)</strong><br />John C. Doyle, Democrat<br />Mark Gjonaj, Democrat<br />Marjorie Velazquez, Democrat<br />Egidio Sementilli, Democrat<br />John Cerini, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 14</strong><br />Fernando Cabrera, Democrat, incumbent<br />Randy Abreu, Democrat<br />Felix Perdomo, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 15</strong><br />Ritchie Torres, Democrat, incumbent<br />Jayson Cancel, Jr., Martial Arts Party</p> <p><strong>City Council District 16</strong><br />Vanessa Gibson, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 17</strong><br />Rafael Salamanca, Democrat, incumbent<br />Helen Foreman-Hines, Democrat<br />Patrick Delices, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 18 - open seat (held by Annabel Palma)</strong><br />Amanda Farias, Democrat<br />Elvin Garcia, Democrat<br />Michael Beltzer, Democrat<br />Ruben Diaz, Sr., Democrat<br />William Moore, Democrat<br />Carl Lundgren, Green<br />Eisley Constantine, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 19</strong><br />Paul Vallone, Democrat, incumbent<br />Paul Graziano, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 20</strong><br />Peter Koo, Democrat, incumbent<br />Alison Tan, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 21 - open seat (held by Julissa Ferreras-Copeland)</strong><br />Hiram Monserrate, Democrat<br />Francisco Moya, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 22</strong><br />Costa Constantinides, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 23</strong><br />Barry Grodenchik, Democrat, incumbent<br />Benny Itteera, Democrat<br />Joseph Concannon, Republican<br />John Lim (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 24</strong><br />Rory Lancman, Democrat, incumbent<br />Mohammad Rahman, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 25</strong><br />Daniel Dromm, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 26<br /></strong>Jimmy Van Bramer, Democrat, incumbent<br />Marvin Jeffcoat, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 27</strong><br />I. Daneek Miller, Democrat, incumbent<br />Anthony Rivers, Democrat<br />Rupert Green, Republican<br />Frank Francois, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 28 - open seat (Ruben Wills was convicted on public corruption charges)</strong><br />Adrienne Adams, Democrat<br />Richard David, Democrat<br />Hettie V. Powell, Democrat<br />Ivan Mossop, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 29</strong><br />Karen Koslowitz, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 30</strong><br />Elizabeth Crowley, Democrat, incumbent<br />Robert Holden, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 31</strong><br />Donovan Richards, Democrat, incumbent<br />Derek Hamilton (party TBD)<br />Latanya Collins (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 32</strong><br />Eric Ulrich, Republican, incumbent<br />Mike Scala, Democrat<br />Helal Sheikh, Democrat<br />William Ruiz, Democrat<br />Jay Rivera (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 33</strong><br />Stephen Levin, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 34</strong><br />Antonio Reynoso, Democrat, incumbent<br />Tommy Torres, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 35</strong><br />Laurie Cumbo, Democrat, incumbent<br />Ede Fox, Democrat<br />Jabari Brisport, Green<br />Scott Hutchins, Green<br />Christine Parker, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 36</strong><br />Robert Cornegy, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 37</strong><br />Rafael Espinal, Democrat, incumbent<br />Persephone Sarah Jane Smith, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 38</strong><br />Carlos Menchaca, Democrat, incumbent<br />Delvis Valdes, Democrat<br />Sara Gonzalez, Democrat<br />Felix Ortiz, Democrat<br />Chris Miao, Democrat<br />Carmen Hulbert, Green</p> <p><strong>City Council District 39</strong><br />Brad Lander, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 40</strong><br />Mathieu Eugene, Democrat, incumbent<br />Brian Cunningham, Democrat<br />Pia Raymond, Democrat<br />Jennifer Berkley, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 41 - open seat (held by Darlene Mealy)</strong><br />Moreen King, Democrat<br />Deidre Olivera, Democrat<br />Cory Provost, Democrat<br />Henry Butler, Democrat<br />Alicka Ampry-Samuel, Democrat<br />David Miller, Democrat<br />Leopold Cox, Democrat<br />Royston Antoine, Democrat<br />Victor Jordan, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 42</strong><br />Inez Barron, Democrat, incumbent<br />Mawuli Hormeku, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 43 - open seat (held by Vincent Gentile)</strong><br />Bob Capano, Republican<br />Liam McCabe, Republican<br />John Quaglione, Republican<br />Lucretia Regina-Potter, Republican<br />Justin Brannan, Democrat<br />Kevin Peter Carroll, Democrat<br />Nancy Tong, Democrat<br />Khader El-Yateem, Democrat<br />Vincenzo Chirico, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 44 - open seat (held by David Greenfield, who is not seeking reelection)</strong><br />Kalman Yeger, Democrat<br />Yoni Hikind, Our Neighborhood</p> <p><strong>City Council District 45</strong><br />Jumaane Williams, Democrat, incumbent<br />Louis Cespedes, Democrat<br />Anthony Beckford, Green<br />Stanley Dumas (party TBD)</p> <p><strong>City Council District 46</strong><br />Alan Maisel, Democrat, incumbent</p> <p><strong>City Council District 47</strong><br />Mark Treyger, Democrat, incumbent<br />Raimondo Denaro, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 48</strong><br />Chaim M. Deutsch, Democrat, incumbent<br />Marat Filler, Democrat<br />Steven Saperstein, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 49</strong><br />Debi Rose, Democrat, incumbent<br />Kamillah Payne-Hanks, Democrat<br />Michael Penrose, Republican</p> <p><strong>City Council District 50</strong><br />Steven Matteo, Republican, incumbent<br />Richard Florentino, Democrat</p> <p><strong>City Council District 51</strong><br />Joe Borelli, Republican, incumbent<br />Dylan Schwartz, Democrat</p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Brendan Birth contributed to this article.</p> <p><a href="http://vote.nyc.ny.us/downloads/pdf/documents/boe/2017PrimaryElection/PrimaryContestList_8_9.2017RW2.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Official Board of Elections primary listing.</a></p>
Massey Pledge to Not Take Money from People with City Business Only Applies to Potential Reelection 2017-03-04T05:00:00+00:00 2017-03-04T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6791:massey-pledge-to-not-take-money-from-people-with-city-business-only-applies-to-potential-reelection Ben Max <p dir="ltr"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/32994678776_65ff0cdfcd_z.jpg" alt="Paul Massey at City Hall mayoral candidate" width="600" height="400" /></p> <p dir="ltr">Paul Massey (photo: Samar Khurshid/Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p dir="ltr">Mayoral candidate Paul Massey, a real estate executive running for the Republican nomination, has promised to not accept financial campaign contributions from people who do business with the city. But, that pledge does not apply to his current campaign, which has already received about two dozen donations from people with city business.</p> <p dir="ltr">While Massey has made the promise on the trail, when presented with Gotham Gazette’s analysis of his contributors, Massey’s campaign clarified Friday that the candidate meant it prospectively -- he won’t accept contributions from those on the city’s “doing business” list if he is elected mayor, meaning for a potential re-election bid.</p> <p dir="ltr">Massey has so far based his early campaign on criticizing Mayor Bill de Blasio, a first term Democrat, and has offered little in the way of concrete policy proposals. He has called the mayor “corrupt” based on the numerous state and federal investigations into his administration, and for purportedly awarding city business to campaign donors, which Massey pledged he wouldn’t do if he became mayor.</p> <p dir="ltr">At his <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6768-focused-on-de-blasio-investigations-massey-makes-city-hall-campaign-debut" target="_blank">first news conference</a> on February 21 at City Hall, Massey said the city needs a leader who could govern with “independence and integrity” and wasn’t beholden to special interests or any group “that either has business before the city or could influence his decisions in an irrational way.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Massey repeated his pledge at a Wednesday event for mayoral candidates hosted by the Brooklyn Republican Party. “I’m living to the letter of the law with the election giving limits,” he said, according to <a href="http://www.politico.com/states/new-york/city-hall/story/2017/03/massey-hits-de-blasio-sticks-to-policy-generalities-at-gop-candidates-forum-110011" target="_blank">Politico New York</a>. “I think that, given the strict limits of the election law, no one will have influence on us…I will take no money, zero dollars, from anyone doing business with the city.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Campaign finance records show that Massey is not yet following that pledge -- he has accepted about two dozen contributions totaling $8,200 from donors who are also on the city’s <a href="http://www.nyc.gov/html/doingbiz/home.html" target="_blank">Doing Business Database</a>. Under the city’s campaign finance law, people with city business can give a maximum of $400 to a mayoral candidate. Most of the doing-business contributions to Massey come from people in the real estate industry, and a few were bundled by an employee of Cushman &amp; Wakefield, a commercial real estate company that bought Massey’s $2 billion brokerage firm, Massey Knakal Real Estate Services, in 2014.</p> <p dir="ltr">Those contributions are no great sum, particularly given Massey has raised about $1.6 million, personally loaned his campaign another $1.2 million, and spent $1.96 million, largely on consultants. But certain, additional contributions also came amid larger ones connected with the doing-business donors. For instance, Stephen Katzman, president at S. Katzman Produce, gave $400 to the campaign -- Katzman is on the doing business list as his company is a wholesaler at the Hunts Point Terminal Market, which is leased from the city. But six employees of the company, three of whom appear to be relatives of Katzman, donated $25,250 all together. Five of them gave $4,950 each, the maximum permissible contribution to a mayoral candidate for those not on the doing-business list.</p> <p dir="ltr">James Donaghy could only give $400, as he owns a construction company with city contracts, but he also acted as an intermediary and bundled $13,350 for Massey’s campaign. Mitchell Steir, another bundler, pulled together $12,400 for Massey, while giving $400 himself since he is also on the list.</p> <p dir="ltr">Six other donors who are listed in the city’s Doing Business Database contributed more than the legal limit and their contributions were refunded, according to Massey’s campaign (Four of the refunds were not reflected on current campaign finance filings but the campaign said they would be noted in the next filing). Only one, Robert Von Ancken, subsequently gave the allowable max of $400 to the campaign.</p> <p dir="ltr">Fullington, the spokesperson for Massey’s campaign, doesn’t believe there is a contradiction in the candidate’s pledge. “Paul Massey has been very clear that he will not take contributions from anyone doing business with the City once he is Mayor,” she said, in an email. “His friends and business associates are allowed to give money to him to support his campaign.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Asked if 2017 campaign contributors may be barred from ever doing business with the city if Massey is elected mayor, Fullington said, “Anyone who has done business with Paul knows he has a record of integrity and he has been very clear to his campaign supporters that there will not be special deals once he is elected Mayor.”</p> <p dir="ltr">That argument is similar to what de Blasio has said in defending himself amid allegations of a pay-to-play culture at City Hall related to the mayor raising hundreds of thousands of dollars from entities with city business for his now defunct political nonprofit, The Campaign for One New York. De Blasio continues to insist that all decisions he and his deputies make are “based on the merits,” not any donation.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Massey campaign has so far been focused on attacking de Blasio, while portraying Massey in contrast to the incumbent as a strong manager, smart executive, and hard worker who is above reproach ethically.</p> <p dir="ltr">Massey has also criticized the mayor for participating in the city campaign finance system’s public matching funds program. An email blast sent out by the campaign on Thursday read, “Bill de Blasio has a rampant history of corruption and can't be trusted with taxpayer money — or City Hall for that matter — but he is using taxpayer money to fund his campaign anyway.”</p> <p dir="ltr">While Massey is required by city law to file disclosures with the city Campaign Finance Board, he is opting out of the public-matching system, which awards money to candidates based on donations up to $175. De Blasio is participating, as he did in 2013, and in prior campaigns for his previous elected offices.</p> <p dir="ltr">Massey’s position is at odds with the general sentiment about the program, which is held up as a national model and tends to level the playing field for those candidates who don’t have access to significant wealth or a donor base of moneyed interests. “Paul is not taking matching funds, and would much rather taxpayer dollars go to the critical programs that make this City great, which serve our children, seniors and veterans,” Fullington said.</p> <p dir="ltr">When Gotham Gazette emailed de Blasio’s campaign for comment on the doing-business contributions to Massey’s campaign and his promise to not accept them as mayor, spokesperson Dan Levitan simply responded, “That is amazing!”</p> <p>***<br />by Samar Khurshid and Felipe De La Hoz</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, City government reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>

***
by Felipe De La Hoz, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p dir="ltr"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/32994678776_65ff0cdfcd_z.jpg" alt="Paul Massey at City Hall mayoral candidate" width="600" height="400" /></p> <p dir="ltr">Paul Massey (photo: Samar Khurshid/Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p dir="ltr">Mayoral candidate Paul Massey, a real estate executive running for the Republican nomination, has promised to not accept financial campaign contributions from people who do business with the city. But, that pledge does not apply to his current campaign, which has already received about two dozen donations from people with city business.</p> <p dir="ltr">While Massey has made the promise on the trail, when presented with Gotham Gazette’s analysis of his contributors, Massey’s campaign clarified Friday that the candidate meant it prospectively -- he won’t accept contributions from those on the city’s “doing business” list if he is elected mayor, meaning for a potential re-election bid.</p> <p dir="ltr">Massey has so far based his early campaign on criticizing Mayor Bill de Blasio, a first term Democrat, and has offered little in the way of concrete policy proposals. He has called the mayor “corrupt” based on the numerous state and federal investigations into his administration, and for purportedly awarding city business to campaign donors, which Massey pledged he wouldn’t do if he became mayor.</p> <p dir="ltr">At his <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6768-focused-on-de-blasio-investigations-massey-makes-city-hall-campaign-debut" target="_blank">first news conference</a> on February 21 at City Hall, Massey said the city needs a leader who could govern with “independence and integrity” and wasn’t beholden to special interests or any group “that either has business before the city or could influence his decisions in an irrational way.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Massey repeated his pledge at a Wednesday event for mayoral candidates hosted by the Brooklyn Republican Party. “I’m living to the letter of the law with the election giving limits,” he said, according to <a href="http://www.politico.com/states/new-york/city-hall/story/2017/03/massey-hits-de-blasio-sticks-to-policy-generalities-at-gop-candidates-forum-110011" target="_blank">Politico New York</a>. “I think that, given the strict limits of the election law, no one will have influence on us…I will take no money, zero dollars, from anyone doing business with the city.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Campaign finance records show that Massey is not yet following that pledge -- he has accepted about two dozen contributions totaling $8,200 from donors who are also on the city’s <a href="http://www.nyc.gov/html/doingbiz/home.html" target="_blank">Doing Business Database</a>. Under the city’s campaign finance law, people with city business can give a maximum of $400 to a mayoral candidate. Most of the doing-business contributions to Massey come from people in the real estate industry, and a few were bundled by an employee of Cushman &amp; Wakefield, a commercial real estate company that bought Massey’s $2 billion brokerage firm, Massey Knakal Real Estate Services, in 2014.</p> <p dir="ltr">Those contributions are no great sum, particularly given Massey has raised about $1.6 million, personally loaned his campaign another $1.2 million, and spent $1.96 million, largely on consultants. But certain, additional contributions also came amid larger ones connected with the doing-business donors. For instance, Stephen Katzman, president at S. Katzman Produce, gave $400 to the campaign -- Katzman is on the doing business list as his company is a wholesaler at the Hunts Point Terminal Market, which is leased from the city. But six employees of the company, three of whom appear to be relatives of Katzman, donated $25,250 all together. Five of them gave $4,950 each, the maximum permissible contribution to a mayoral candidate for those not on the doing-business list.</p> <p dir="ltr">James Donaghy could only give $400, as he owns a construction company with city contracts, but he also acted as an intermediary and bundled $13,350 for Massey’s campaign. Mitchell Steir, another bundler, pulled together $12,400 for Massey, while giving $400 himself since he is also on the list.</p> <p dir="ltr">Six other donors who are listed in the city’s Doing Business Database contributed more than the legal limit and their contributions were refunded, according to Massey’s campaign (Four of the refunds were not reflected on current campaign finance filings but the campaign said they would be noted in the next filing). Only one, Robert Von Ancken, subsequently gave the allowable max of $400 to the campaign.</p> <p dir="ltr">Fullington, the spokesperson for Massey’s campaign, doesn’t believe there is a contradiction in the candidate’s pledge. “Paul Massey has been very clear that he will not take contributions from anyone doing business with the City once he is Mayor,” she said, in an email. “His friends and business associates are allowed to give money to him to support his campaign.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Asked if 2017 campaign contributors may be barred from ever doing business with the city if Massey is elected mayor, Fullington said, “Anyone who has done business with Paul knows he has a record of integrity and he has been very clear to his campaign supporters that there will not be special deals once he is elected Mayor.”</p> <p dir="ltr">That argument is similar to what de Blasio has said in defending himself amid allegations of a pay-to-play culture at City Hall related to the mayor raising hundreds of thousands of dollars from entities with city business for his now defunct political nonprofit, The Campaign for One New York. De Blasio continues to insist that all decisions he and his deputies make are “based on the merits,” not any donation.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Massey campaign has so far been focused on attacking de Blasio, while portraying Massey in contrast to the incumbent as a strong manager, smart executive, and hard worker who is above reproach ethically.</p> <p dir="ltr">Massey has also criticized the mayor for participating in the city campaign finance system’s public matching funds program. An email blast sent out by the campaign on Thursday read, “Bill de Blasio has a rampant history of corruption and can't be trusted with taxpayer money — or City Hall for that matter — but he is using taxpayer money to fund his campaign anyway.”</p> <p dir="ltr">While Massey is required by city law to file disclosures with the city Campaign Finance Board, he is opting out of the public-matching system, which awards money to candidates based on donations up to $175. De Blasio is participating, as he did in 2013, and in prior campaigns for his previous elected offices.</p> <p dir="ltr">Massey’s position is at odds with the general sentiment about the program, which is held up as a national model and tends to level the playing field for those candidates who don’t have access to significant wealth or a donor base of moneyed interests. “Paul is not taking matching funds, and would much rather taxpayer dollars go to the critical programs that make this City great, which serve our children, seniors and veterans,” Fullington said.</p> <p dir="ltr">When Gotham Gazette emailed de Blasio’s campaign for comment on the doing-business contributions to Massey’s campaign and his promise to not accept them as mayor, spokesperson Dan Levitan simply responded, “That is amazing!”</p> <p>***<br />by Samar Khurshid and Felipe De La Hoz</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, City government reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>

***
by Felipe De La Hoz, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Community Group Endorses Four Women of Color for ‘Open’ City Council Seats 2017-02-23T05:00:00+00:00 2017-02-23T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6775:community-group-endorses-four-women-of-color-for-open-city-council-seats Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/rivera_vazquez.jpg" alt="rivera velazquez" width="600" height="449" /></p> <p>Carlina Rivera, left, &amp; Marjorie Velazquez, center (photo: @CarlinaRivera)</p> <hr /> <p>In an effort to promote women’s representation on the City Council, the political arm of one of New York’s largest grassroots immigrant advocacy organizations has endorsed four women of color running for “open” Council seats this year.</p> <p>Make the Road Action (MRA), the political affiliate of Make the Road New York, a group that represents about 20,000 Latinos in New York City and Long Island, will announce its endorsement on Friday for four progressive City Council candidates - Carlina Rivera, Alicka Ampry-Samuel, Diana Ayala, and Marjorie Velazquez. Each is seeking to fill a seat that is being vacated due to term limits.</p> <p>“These four powerful women offer the powerful progressive leadership that our communities and our city need,” said Maria Cortes, an MRA member, in a statement. “They stand with working-class people of color like me on issue after issue including preserving and building truly affordable housing, reforming the NYPD, protecting immigrant families, standing up for workers’ rights, and making sure that all people’s voices are heard in our democracy.”</p> <p>There are only 13 women currently on the 51-seat City Council, down from 18 in 2009, and four of them face term-limits this year, including Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito. Council member Inez Dickens recently stepped down after being elected to the state Assembly, and she is being replaced by State Senator Bill Perkins, who just won a special election.</p> <p>With male candidates overwhelmingly represented in races across the board, there has been a push to ensure the success of women candidates. Mark-Viverito, Council Members Elizabeth Crowley and Margaret Chin, along with good government groups and women’s organizations, recently launched the “21 in ’21” campaign to encourage women to run for City Council and bring the total number of women members to at least 21 through the 2017 and 2021 city election cycles.</p> <p>“It is shocking that in the most progressive city in the United States, only one quarter of our City Council members are women,” Mark-Viverito said in a statement <a href="http://effectiveny.org/2017/01/13/new-effort-to-elect-more-women-to-new-york-city-council/" target="_blank">announcing</a> the initiative. “All New Yorkers suffer when we don’t have equal representation in government and I intend to do everything I can to bring true equity to the Council at long last.”</p> <p>MRA has identified this issue and intends to mobilize its members, numbering in the thousands, to back women candidates who have shown support for progressive causes. Friday’s announcement is its first wave of endorsements and more are expected to follow in the coming months, leading up to the September primaries when most City Council races are actually decided in Democrat-heavy New York City. (Make The Road New York receives discretionary funding through the City Council and individual Council members, for a variety of community programs and services it performs.)</p> <p>The group has similarly endorsed progressive candidates in prior elections. In 2013, MRA’s sister PAC, Make the Road Political Action, even <a href="http://www.nyccfb.info/searchabledb/IndependentExpenditureSearchResult.aspx?ec_id=2013&amp;ec=2013&amp;IndepName=Make+The+Road+Political+Action&amp;IndepName_id=Z48" target="_blank">spent</a> $27,323 for independent mailings supporting Antonio Reynoso for the District 34 Council seat, and opposing Vito Lopez, Reynoso’s primary competitor. Reynoso was victorious.</p> <p>The four candidates now being backed by MRA, in statements accompanying the announcement, noted the importance of MRA’s advocacy at a time when immigrant communities face a volatile political climate at the national level.</p> <p>Carlina Rivera, who is running to replace Council Member Rosie Mendez in Manhattan’s District 2, said she was “honored” to receive MRA’s endorsement. Citing the “despicable and dangerous” policies of the Trump administration, she said, “Make the Road Action has been a leading force in the city’s resistance and through organizing they have built power and self-determination in neighborhoods everywhere. Throughout my career in service, I have strived to achieve these same goals in my own community. The issues we fight for are both important and personal to me.” Rivera, who is Mendez’s legislative director and was endorsed by the Council member, is currently <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6743-the-early-money-race-in-open-city-council-seats" target="_blank">leading</a> the race in fundraising, ahead of five <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6676-candidates-for-2017-city-elections-mayor-city-council-comptroller" target="_blank">opponents</a> so far, four of whom have no funds to their name.</p> <p>“In these times of fear and uncertainty for our immigrant communities, the work of MRA is more important than ever,” said Diana Ayala, deputy chief of staff to Mark-Viverito, who is running to replace her boss in District 8, which covers East Harlem and the South Bronx. Mark-Viverito <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6427-mark-viverito-identifies-successor-for-council-seat" target="_blank">endorsed</a> Ayala last year, writing in a Facebook post, “Diana is a reflection of who I fight for each [and] every day [and] what motivates me to do what I do. There is no better person to represent this district.” Ayala currently has three competitors for the seat, but has far surpassed them in fundraising so far.</p> <p>In District 13 in the Bronx, a crowded field of candidates has declared a run for Council Member James Vacca’s seat. Marjorie Velazquez, a Democratic district leader, has Vacca’s endorsement but will face an uphill challenge. She is second in fundraising, trailing behind state Assembly Member Mark Gjonaj. Velazquez said she was “proud and humbled” that MRA had endorsed her. “This incredible organization helps give a voice to so many people and provides valuable assistance to New York families in need,” she said, in a statement. “Now, more than ever, their services for immigrants, women, senior citizens, tenants and members of the LGBT community have the potential to make real, positive changes in the lives of millions.”</p> <p>The race for Council Member Darlene Mealy’s seat in Brooklyn’s District 41 has seen little action so far. Alicka Ampry-Samuel is one of six candidates in that race, and none of them have posted much in the way of campaign fundraising. “In our current national climate, local municipalities must now become the stewards of protection for all people of color; no matter their country of origin,” Ampry-Samuel said. “I will always fight for New York City to remain a safe haven for the freedoms and rights upon which our country was founded.”</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, City government reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Related:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6676-candidates-for-2017-city-elections-mayor-city-council-comptroller" target="_blank">Candidates for 2017 City Elections</a></p> <p>Related:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6743-the-early-money-race-in-open-city-council-seats" target="_blank">The Early Money Race in ‘Open’ City Council Seats</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6676-candidates-for-2017-city-elections-mayor-city-council-comptroller" target="_blank"></a></p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/rivera_vazquez.jpg" alt="rivera velazquez" width="600" height="449" /></p> <p>Carlina Rivera, left, &amp; Marjorie Velazquez, center (photo: @CarlinaRivera)</p> <hr /> <p>In an effort to promote women’s representation on the City Council, the political arm of one of New York’s largest grassroots immigrant advocacy organizations has endorsed four women of color running for “open” Council seats this year.</p> <p>Make the Road Action (MRA), the political affiliate of Make the Road New York, a group that represents about 20,000 Latinos in New York City and Long Island, will announce its endorsement on Friday for four progressive City Council candidates - Carlina Rivera, Alicka Ampry-Samuel, Diana Ayala, and Marjorie Velazquez. Each is seeking to fill a seat that is being vacated due to term limits.</p> <p>“These four powerful women offer the powerful progressive leadership that our communities and our city need,” said Maria Cortes, an MRA member, in a statement. “They stand with working-class people of color like me on issue after issue including preserving and building truly affordable housing, reforming the NYPD, protecting immigrant families, standing up for workers’ rights, and making sure that all people’s voices are heard in our democracy.”</p> <p>There are only 13 women currently on the 51-seat City Council, down from 18 in 2009, and four of them face term-limits this year, including Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito. Council member Inez Dickens recently stepped down after being elected to the state Assembly, and she is being replaced by State Senator Bill Perkins, who just won a special election.</p> <p>With male candidates overwhelmingly represented in races across the board, there has been a push to ensure the success of women candidates. Mark-Viverito, Council Members Elizabeth Crowley and Margaret Chin, along with good government groups and women’s organizations, recently launched the “21 in ’21” campaign to encourage women to run for City Council and bring the total number of women members to at least 21 through the 2017 and 2021 city election cycles.</p> <p>“It is shocking that in the most progressive city in the United States, only one quarter of our City Council members are women,” Mark-Viverito said in a statement <a href="http://effectiveny.org/2017/01/13/new-effort-to-elect-more-women-to-new-york-city-council/" target="_blank">announcing</a> the initiative. “All New Yorkers suffer when we don’t have equal representation in government and I intend to do everything I can to bring true equity to the Council at long last.”</p> <p>MRA has identified this issue and intends to mobilize its members, numbering in the thousands, to back women candidates who have shown support for progressive causes. Friday’s announcement is its first wave of endorsements and more are expected to follow in the coming months, leading up to the September primaries when most City Council races are actually decided in Democrat-heavy New York City. (Make The Road New York receives discretionary funding through the City Council and individual Council members, for a variety of community programs and services it performs.)</p> <p>The group has similarly endorsed progressive candidates in prior elections. In 2013, MRA’s sister PAC, Make the Road Political Action, even <a href="http://www.nyccfb.info/searchabledb/IndependentExpenditureSearchResult.aspx?ec_id=2013&amp;ec=2013&amp;IndepName=Make+The+Road+Political+Action&amp;IndepName_id=Z48" target="_blank">spent</a> $27,323 for independent mailings supporting Antonio Reynoso for the District 34 Council seat, and opposing Vito Lopez, Reynoso’s primary competitor. Reynoso was victorious.</p> <p>The four candidates now being backed by MRA, in statements accompanying the announcement, noted the importance of MRA’s advocacy at a time when immigrant communities face a volatile political climate at the national level.</p> <p>Carlina Rivera, who is running to replace Council Member Rosie Mendez in Manhattan’s District 2, said she was “honored” to receive MRA’s endorsement. Citing the “despicable and dangerous” policies of the Trump administration, she said, “Make the Road Action has been a leading force in the city’s resistance and through organizing they have built power and self-determination in neighborhoods everywhere. Throughout my career in service, I have strived to achieve these same goals in my own community. The issues we fight for are both important and personal to me.” Rivera, who is Mendez’s legislative director and was endorsed by the Council member, is currently <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6743-the-early-money-race-in-open-city-council-seats" target="_blank">leading</a> the race in fundraising, ahead of five <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6676-candidates-for-2017-city-elections-mayor-city-council-comptroller" target="_blank">opponents</a> so far, four of whom have no funds to their name.</p> <p>“In these times of fear and uncertainty for our immigrant communities, the work of MRA is more important than ever,” said Diana Ayala, deputy chief of staff to Mark-Viverito, who is running to replace her boss in District 8, which covers East Harlem and the South Bronx. Mark-Viverito <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6427-mark-viverito-identifies-successor-for-council-seat" target="_blank">endorsed</a> Ayala last year, writing in a Facebook post, “Diana is a reflection of who I fight for each [and] every day [and] what motivates me to do what I do. There is no better person to represent this district.” Ayala currently has three competitors for the seat, but has far surpassed them in fundraising so far.</p> <p>In District 13 in the Bronx, a crowded field of candidates has declared a run for Council Member James Vacca’s seat. Marjorie Velazquez, a Democratic district leader, has Vacca’s endorsement but will face an uphill challenge. She is second in fundraising, trailing behind state Assembly Member Mark Gjonaj. Velazquez said she was “proud and humbled” that MRA had endorsed her. “This incredible organization helps give a voice to so many people and provides valuable assistance to New York families in need,” she said, in a statement. “Now, more than ever, their services for immigrants, women, senior citizens, tenants and members of the LGBT community have the potential to make real, positive changes in the lives of millions.”</p> <p>The race for Council Member Darlene Mealy’s seat in Brooklyn’s District 41 has seen little action so far. Alicka Ampry-Samuel is one of six candidates in that race, and none of them have posted much in the way of campaign fundraising. “In our current national climate, local municipalities must now become the stewards of protection for all people of color; no matter their country of origin,” Ampry-Samuel said. “I will always fight for New York City to remain a safe haven for the freedoms and rights upon which our country was founded.”</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, City government reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Related:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6676-candidates-for-2017-city-elections-mayor-city-council-comptroller" target="_blank">Candidates for 2017 City Elections</a></p> <p>Related:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6743-the-early-money-race-in-open-city-council-seats" target="_blank">The Early Money Race in ‘Open’ City Council Seats</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6676-candidates-for-2017-city-elections-mayor-city-council-comptroller" target="_blank"></a></p>
Focused on De Blasio Investigations, Massey Makes City Hall Campaign Debut 2017-02-21T05:00:00+00:00 2017-02-21T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6768:focused-on-de-blasio-investigations-massey-makes-city-hall-campaign-debut Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/32909930571_dbaab91b44_z.jpg" alt="Massey City Hall presser BdB" width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>Paul Massey (photo: Samar Khurshid/Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p>Republican mayoral candidate Paul Massey took his campaign to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s home turf Tuesday, hosting a news conference at the steps of City Hall to criticize the mayor’s record and the ongoing legal investigations into de Blasio’s campaign and government behavior.</p> <p>Massey, a millionaire real estate executive, has centered his early campaign on attacking de Blasio as corrupt and incompetent. In what was his first official news conference as a mayoral candidate, Massey was short on policy pronouncements but focused on the federal and state investigations into de Blasio’s administration and fundraising practices.</p> <p>“Bill de Blasio is so distracted with corruption charges that he has no time to actually run this city,” Massey said. The mayor himself does not face any charges stemming from the investigations and none of his associates have been officially accused of wrongdoing. However, de Blasio has met with Manhattan District Attorney’s office and is set to meet with federal prosecutors soon as grand juries are reportedly hearing evidence in two separate cases.</p> <p>Massey also claimed, as have many of the mayor’s critics, that quality of life in the city is getting worse, though statistics show crime at historically low levels and the city economy flourishing.</p> <p>The news conference was an unofficial kickoff for Massey’s fledgling campaign that has quickly ramped up fundraising and expenditure in the last few months, setting him up as the likely frontrunner for the Republican nomination. Multiple potentially-formidable Republican candidates have yet to declare a run, including City Council Member Eric Ulrich and businessman John Catsimatidis. In the effort to beat de Blasio, some Republican leaders <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6735-to-defeat-de-blasio-republicans-look-for-early-rally-behind-one-candidate" target="_blank">are looking to avoid a contentious primary and rally behind one mayoral candidate early</a>.</p> <p>While he has made numerous speaking appearances in recent weeks, Massey has not held press briefings or outlined any elements of a policy agenda. Massey has <a href="http://maps.nyccfb.info/?latlng=40.705896%2C-73.89968&amp;z=10&amp;office=Mayor&amp;candidate=MasseyPJ&amp;geography=zipcodes&amp;amountType=total&amp;filingPeriod=0" target="_blank">raised</a> $1.6 million, personally loaned his campaign another $1.2 million, and spent about $1.96 million in total, leaving him a balance of about $937,000.</p> <p>Standing in front of large charts listing details of the six agency probes into the mayor and his associates, and the more than $11 million dedicated to the administration’s legal defense, Massey called for a seventh investigation, claiming that the mayor’s agreement with a law firm for his personal defense is unethical and illegal. De Blasio has retained the firm Kramer Levin to defend himself and has said he will pay the firm with funds raised through outside sources, which he will disclose. Other government employees involved in the probes have received government-funded legal defense, which de Blasio said he is not taking advantage of himself.</p> <p>The mayor has yet to provide details of the fund or the legal agreement, saying again on Tuesday at his own unrelated news conference that he and his team are in the process of figuring out the model they will use.</p> <p>“Somehow this mayor has reached a point where he’s embracing corruption just to defend himself from corruption,” Massey said, revealing that he wrote to the Manhattan District Attorney’s office and to the office of the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York calling for scrutiny of the agreement.</p> <p>Insisting that the mayor is beholden to special interests, Massey compared him to infamous former Mayor Jimmy Walker, who served between 1926 and 1932 during the Tammany Hall era. In contrast, Massey sought to set himself up as a Republican in the Michael Bloomberg model, who would be able to make independent decisions in office. He pledged that, if elected, he would not award city contracts to campaign donors or use taxpayer money for possible legal defense against corruption in City Hall. He then called on the mayor to make the same promise.</p> <p>De Blasio’s administration is being investigated for whether donors to the mayor’s political nonprofit, The Campaign for One New York, received government favors. He and his team are also being investigated for fundraising practices used in a 2014 effort to flip the state Senate into Democratic hands. De Blasio has insisted that he and his associates carefully followed legal guidance and broke no laws.</p> <p>Massey’s criticism didn’t stop at the mayor’s legal troubles as he took swipes at everything from the mayor’s habit of showing up to City Hall late in the work day after the gym to his handling of the homelessness crisis, which has become a major challenge for de Blasio.</p> <p>But Massey seemed unprepared to offer any substantive policy solutions or his vision for the city. He did not propose a plan to tackle homelessness, simply saying he would “put a team in place” prior to taking office that would “make a difference almost immediately.”</p> <p>When asked, Massey also refused to say whether he supports or opposes President Donald Trump’s proposed policies on health care and criminal justice. “I think the mayor would like it if we made this a referendum about the president and I’m not gonna do that,” Massey said. On the issue of expanding stop-and-frisk policing, he told a reporter, “I haven’t established an answer.”</p> <p>Mayor de Blasio responded to a few of Massey’s critiques, relayed by reporters in real time as he held a news conference across town to announce his new commissioner of the Administration for Children Services. Remarking on Massey’s lack of an answer on stop-and-frisk, de Blasio said sarcastically, “The issue really hasn’t been in the news the last few years, so who could blame him.”</p> <p>He added, “Yeah, I would suggest you need to have an answer on that one. This was one of the dominant issues of the 2013...campaign. I was sitting at Hofstra University when Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton personally debated it on national television. We’ve made announcement after announcement, first with Commissioner Bratton then Commissioner O’Neill about the reduction in stop-and-frisk over the last three years...constant reduction in crime simultaneously. Those are the facts someone who wants to be mayor of New York City really should know.”</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, City government reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/32909930571_dbaab91b44_z.jpg" alt="Massey City Hall presser BdB" width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>Paul Massey (photo: Samar Khurshid/Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p>Republican mayoral candidate Paul Massey took his campaign to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s home turf Tuesday, hosting a news conference at the steps of City Hall to criticize the mayor’s record and the ongoing legal investigations into de Blasio’s campaign and government behavior.</p> <p>Massey, a millionaire real estate executive, has centered his early campaign on attacking de Blasio as corrupt and incompetent. In what was his first official news conference as a mayoral candidate, Massey was short on policy pronouncements but focused on the federal and state investigations into de Blasio’s administration and fundraising practices.</p> <p>“Bill de Blasio is so distracted with corruption charges that he has no time to actually run this city,” Massey said. The mayor himself does not face any charges stemming from the investigations and none of his associates have been officially accused of wrongdoing. However, de Blasio has met with Manhattan District Attorney’s office and is set to meet with federal prosecutors soon as grand juries are reportedly hearing evidence in two separate cases.</p> <p>Massey also claimed, as have many of the mayor’s critics, that quality of life in the city is getting worse, though statistics show crime at historically low levels and the city economy flourishing.</p> <p>The news conference was an unofficial kickoff for Massey’s fledgling campaign that has quickly ramped up fundraising and expenditure in the last few months, setting him up as the likely frontrunner for the Republican nomination. Multiple potentially-formidable Republican candidates have yet to declare a run, including City Council Member Eric Ulrich and businessman John Catsimatidis. In the effort to beat de Blasio, some Republican leaders <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6735-to-defeat-de-blasio-republicans-look-for-early-rally-behind-one-candidate" target="_blank">are looking to avoid a contentious primary and rally behind one mayoral candidate early</a>.</p> <p>While he has made numerous speaking appearances in recent weeks, Massey has not held press briefings or outlined any elements of a policy agenda. Massey has <a href="http://maps.nyccfb.info/?latlng=40.705896%2C-73.89968&amp;z=10&amp;office=Mayor&amp;candidate=MasseyPJ&amp;geography=zipcodes&amp;amountType=total&amp;filingPeriod=0" target="_blank">raised</a> $1.6 million, personally loaned his campaign another $1.2 million, and spent about $1.96 million in total, leaving him a balance of about $937,000.</p> <p>Standing in front of large charts listing details of the six agency probes into the mayor and his associates, and the more than $11 million dedicated to the administration’s legal defense, Massey called for a seventh investigation, claiming that the mayor’s agreement with a law firm for his personal defense is unethical and illegal. De Blasio has retained the firm Kramer Levin to defend himself and has said he will pay the firm with funds raised through outside sources, which he will disclose. Other government employees involved in the probes have received government-funded legal defense, which de Blasio said he is not taking advantage of himself.</p> <p>The mayor has yet to provide details of the fund or the legal agreement, saying again on Tuesday at his own unrelated news conference that he and his team are in the process of figuring out the model they will use.</p> <p>“Somehow this mayor has reached a point where he’s embracing corruption just to defend himself from corruption,” Massey said, revealing that he wrote to the Manhattan District Attorney’s office and to the office of the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York calling for scrutiny of the agreement.</p> <p>Insisting that the mayor is beholden to special interests, Massey compared him to infamous former Mayor Jimmy Walker, who served between 1926 and 1932 during the Tammany Hall era. In contrast, Massey sought to set himself up as a Republican in the Michael Bloomberg model, who would be able to make independent decisions in office. He pledged that, if elected, he would not award city contracts to campaign donors or use taxpayer money for possible legal defense against corruption in City Hall. He then called on the mayor to make the same promise.</p> <p>De Blasio’s administration is being investigated for whether donors to the mayor’s political nonprofit, The Campaign for One New York, received government favors. He and his team are also being investigated for fundraising practices used in a 2014 effort to flip the state Senate into Democratic hands. De Blasio has insisted that he and his associates carefully followed legal guidance and broke no laws.</p> <p>Massey’s criticism didn’t stop at the mayor’s legal troubles as he took swipes at everything from the mayor’s habit of showing up to City Hall late in the work day after the gym to his handling of the homelessness crisis, which has become a major challenge for de Blasio.</p> <p>But Massey seemed unprepared to offer any substantive policy solutions or his vision for the city. He did not propose a plan to tackle homelessness, simply saying he would “put a team in place” prior to taking office that would “make a difference almost immediately.”</p> <p>When asked, Massey also refused to say whether he supports or opposes President Donald Trump’s proposed policies on health care and criminal justice. “I think the mayor would like it if we made this a referendum about the president and I’m not gonna do that,” Massey said. On the issue of expanding stop-and-frisk policing, he told a reporter, “I haven’t established an answer.”</p> <p>Mayor de Blasio responded to a few of Massey’s critiques, relayed by reporters in real time as he held a news conference across town to announce his new commissioner of the Administration for Children Services. Remarking on Massey’s lack of an answer on stop-and-frisk, de Blasio said sarcastically, “The issue really hasn’t been in the news the last few years, so who could blame him.”</p> <p>He added, “Yeah, I would suggest you need to have an answer on that one. This was one of the dominant issues of the 2013...campaign. I was sitting at Hofstra University when Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton personally debated it on national television. We’ve made announcement after announcement, first with Commissioner Bratton then Commissioner O’Neill about the reduction in stop-and-frisk over the last three years...constant reduction in crime simultaneously. Those are the facts someone who wants to be mayor of New York City really should know.”</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, City government reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
New Year’s Resolutions for Mayor de Blasio 2017-01-02T05:00:00+00:00 2017-01-02T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6695:new-year-s-resolutions-for-mayor-de-blasio Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/31926819196_5559308de7_z.jpg" width="600" height="400" alt="de blasio nypd new year" /></p> <p>Mayor de Blasio (photo:&nbsp;Michael Appleton/ Mayor's Office)</p> <hr /> <p>At the end of his first year in office, Mayor Bill de Blasio said his new year’s resolution for 2015 was to be on time more often. The chronically late mayor mostly made good on that resolution. At the end of 2015, NY1’s Errol Louis asked de Blasio for a resolution and the mayor didn’t come up with anything on the spot -- I subsequently offered several to him in <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ben-max-new-year-resolutions-bill-de-blasio-article-1.2480119" target="_blank">a Daily News column</a>.</p> <p>He accomplished few of them.</p> <p>As 2016 came to a close, de Blasio didn't make an explicit resolution, but he seems to have settled on better addressing the city’s homelessness crisis as his major area for improvement in 2017.</p> <p>On multiple occasions recently, the mayor has acknowledged that the city has been unsuccessful driving down the shelter census, which has increased significantly during de Blasio’s three years in office, to about 60,000, continuing an upward trend over decades that accelerated under Mayor Michael Bloomberg. While admitting the need to do better, de Blasio has also said the crisis would be even worse but for his administration’s actions, such as increasing rent subsidies and providing lawyers for thousands of tenants facing eviction.</p> <p>When I asked the mayor at a December 29 press conference what mistakes he’s made in 2016 and what he hopes to do differently in 2017, he cited homelessness, but also said, “I’m very tough on myself. I’m very tough on my team...I want perfection from myself, I want perfection from them. But I make mistakes all the time and then I try and fix them. I try and figure out how I can do better. But I don’t make it a point to sort of self-flagellate nor to exaggerate when something goes right. I try and keep an even keel.”</p> <p>He did not offer anything specific beyond homelessness.</p> <p>So, like last year, I am suggesting several new year’s resolutions for Mayor de Blasio. The list would have been slightly different had de Blasio not moved in 2016 to clean up some of his messes: closing down the Campaign for One New York, limiting his meetings with lobbyists, and <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6643-de-blasio-limits-government-contact-with-top-outside-advisor" target="_blank">cutting top outside advisors (“agents of the city”) from government meetings</a>, for example.</p> <p>Still, there are a number of things the mayor can resolve to do better in 2017, if he so chooses:</p> <p><strong>Show, Don’t Tell</strong><br />De Blasio has struggled to portray a strong image as an in-charge, on-top-of-things Mayor. He’s shown more interest in broad themes than nuts-and-bolts operations, though he’s recognized the need to be more present in neighborhoods. While de Blasio has started to hold town hall meetings throughout the city, he is still not as active as he could or should be on-site as city employees carry out essential tasks and provide public services.</p> <p>It doesn’t have to be as hokey as helping fill a pothole, but more activity along those lines would be helpful to New Yorkers, city workers, and de Blasio himself -- both practically and politically. The mayor doesn’t even have to do any of the work, but he could more regularly visit what is happening “in the field,” see how it’s being done, thank those doing it, and show New Yorkers he’s overseeing things up-close.</p> <p><strong>Own Your Accomplishments</strong><br />The mayor should hold more events to showcase his administration’s many accomplishments. Right now the mayor is known for his impressive implementation of universal pre-kindergarten. But, he could be known for much more if he were to put forth a sustained effort to promote and own what his administration is devoting resources to in order to create the more equal city de Blasio wants.</p> <p>Instead of being known solely as The Pre-K Mayor, de Blasio could fairly easily also be known as The Affordable Housing Mayor; The Small Business Mayor; The Gender Equity Mayor; The Street Safety Mayor; The NYCHA Mayor; The Renewable Energy Mayor.</p> <p>Can you imagine de Blasio holding 10 events on one subject within a month? (As, for example, Governor Cuomo just did on the Second Avenue Subway.)</p> <p>I’m not sure de Blasio ever did that on pre-K. And, somehow, he still hasn’t done it on crime, despite the fact that crime has continued to trend downward during his tenure (while he’s also implemented several aspects of criminal justice reform). There are many opportunities to own these accomplishments and others. De Blasio may be closest on street safety (Vision Zero), affordable housing, and crime, but he’s nowhere near “there,” and could be in 2017.</p> <p><strong>Circle the Wagons at the City Council</strong><br />The City Council is key to de Blasio accomplishing some of his goals. The mayor has some stalwart allies in the Council: seven members already endorsed him for re-election, and others are sure to follow. And, de Blasio has made holding a town hall in every Council district a goal and has done a good number so far.</p> <p>But, he’s also faced some tough resistance to certain affordable housing projects, criticism of his management, and other pushback. It’s only natural that as a mayor’s tenure extends some relationships will fray while others blossom. De Blasio needs to make sure that he maintains key relationships, that he works with new Council allies, and that he doesn’t allow too many relationships to deteriorate. It could also benefit him to work on some of the already-frayed relationships -- with, say, City Council Member Rory Lancman, a steady de Blasio critic.</p> <p><strong>Explain Your Plans Better</strong><br />De Blasio has promised a new outline of his fight against homelessness. Why don’t New Yorkers have a better sense of what’s already happening?</p> <p>And, there are other plenty of other problems to tackle, whether citywide, by borough, or in specific neighborhoods. The mayor will surely announce new initiatives during his February State of the City speech, and he has a re-election platform to lay out.</p> <p>Even before he announces new homelessness-fighting measures and puts them together with ongoing programs to show a more complete picture, there has been an avoidable deficiency in how the city’s efforts are presented.</p> <p>Why not hold a press conference to make a detailed, clear presentation of the different pieces and how they fit together -- on homelessness, or transportation equity, or any number of complex subjects? The mayor does this each year for his budget address and he has given multiple education-focused speeches, with accompanying presentation slides. He could easily do this type of thing more often to showcase the steps his administration is taking on key policy issues.</p> <p><strong>Stop Blurring the Lines</strong><br />As with the Campaign for One New York, other efforts that have resulted in law enforcement investigations, and his “agents of the city” declaration, de Blasio has made a pattern of blurring ethical lines, if not crossing legal ones. Even as he’s <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6643-de-blasio-limits-government-contact-with-top-outside-advisor" target="_blank">moved away</a> from some of the more troublesome practices -- like allowing a consultant who has clients with city business to sit in on government meetings -- It happened again when City Hall released a video touting the de Blasio administration’s accomplishments and praising the mayor himself.</p> <p>Instead of taking all kinds of action that require conflicts-of-interest and legal guidance, not to mention rhetorical tap-dancing, de Blasio should resolve to a higher standard.</p> <p><strong>Build and Repair Other Relationships</strong><br />Things are probably beyond repair with Governor Cuomo, but it can only help to inch things in a more positive direction. Likewise Scott Stringer, another fellow Democrat, but the mayor should figure out ways to pull the city comptroller closer -- see, for example, how Cuomo made Attorney General Eric Schneiderman a special prosecutor in police killings of unarmed individuals. One easy way is the private-sector retirement savings program <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6692-federal-government-paves-way-for-city-backed-retirement-savings-program" target="_blank">that the city is developing</a>. There are a host of other potential collaborations that may give the comptroller a little more pause before excoriating the de Blasio administration at every possible turn.</p> <p>There are less far-fetched opportunities for the mayor to build and repair other non-City Council relationships, though. Which state lawmakers should de Blasio look to partner with beyond Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, who must remain a major de Blasio ally? Assemblymembers Michael Blake, Nily Rozic, and Brian Kavanagh make sense; State Senator Liz Krueger is an incredibly obvious ally the mayor should do more with, as is Senator Gustavo Rivera; and why not embrace the handful of Brooklyn state Senators who represent much of the mayor’s base, as well as other Democratic state legislators from across the five boroughs.</p> <p>Then there is the quaint notion of bipartisanship. De Blasio has found some common ground with State Senator Martin Golden, he should find other opportunities to work with Republicans in both city and state government. Staten Island is always a good place for this type of effort. City Council Minority Leader Steve Matteo is the type of elected official who cares far less about political party than he does about getting things done for his constituents -- plenty that can be done with him. This type of work may even help improve the mayor's standing with white New Yorkers, who, according to opinion polls, have strongly unfavorable views of him.</p> <p><strong>Manage Better Before Crises</strong><br />It’s the nature of government (and other sectors) that reforms are made in response to crisis. But, it’s clear from de Blasio’s management style, the city’s ballooning budget, and other evidence, that de Blasio has not made priorities of operational and organizational reforms.</p> <p>Has he asked his deputy mayors and agency commissioners for reimagined org charts, with explanations? Has he asked commissioners to trim the fat at their agencies where they have shifted focus from the prior administration? A little of the latter, but not enough.</p> <p>It can be good to look like you're responding to a crisis with reform, but it's also important to not always look or be so reactive when being more proactive can help prevent problems.</p> <p>The Rivington House sage made it clear that First Deputy Mayor Tony Shorris has too much on his plate. And while Shorris’ office is <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6681-city-hall-hire-to-help-first-deputy-mayor-with-vast-portfolio" target="_blank">bringing in a new high-level administrator</a>, there may be room in 2017 for restructuring the upper management of City Hall, perhaps adding a deputy mayor, which could then lead to a new look at every city agency, how each is being managed, and where improvements can be made. Some new policy ideas could also emerge, and that wouldn’t be half-bad, for the mayor or New Yorkers.</p> <p><strong>Figure Out Your Media Strategy</strong><br />De Blasio has said several times over the years that he has struggled to communicate. He’s rearranged his press strategy several times, made a number of <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6589-in-communications-move-de-blasio-chooses-campaign-over-city-hall" target="_blank">changes to his communications team</a> (a new communications director, his third, is about to start mid-January), and failed to develop any semblance of good will among the City Hall press corps (he hasn’t really tried). De Blasio has significantly limited the occasions on which he takes questions from members of that press corps, and rarely hosts press conferences at City Hall.</p> <p>Most, if not all, members of the media think de Blasio should be more available to the press, of course. The mayor thinks the City Hall press corps ‘doesn’t get it’ and is often stuck on trivial matters, like the mayor’s helicopter rides or law enforcement investigations that de Blasio thinks shouldn’t overshadow the noble work he’s doing. Speaking of something de Blasio finds trivial, there’s been little press attention of late on the mayor’s gym routine, but that’s another good resolution for de Blasio in 2017: find a gym near Gracie Mansion or City Hall, and only visit the Park Slope Y on the weekends. Unfortunately, doing this in 2017 would look like a cynical re-election year ploy, but it would be welcome by many anyway.</p> <p>De Blasio should be more open and frank, with the press and the public. He should hold more press conferences and take more questions when he does hold them. The mayor should give more one-on-one interviews to more outlets, especially if he’s going to continue to limit his press conference Q&amp;As, and he should do more quick "gaggles" with reporters who follow him to public events where he's giving remarks or marching in a parade. And, City Hall should make a more concerted effort to get city commissioners in front of reporters and onto the airwaves.</p> <p>The mayor regularly misses opportunities for “good news” press events, a mystifying pattern since he took office, and another thing that is easily fixable.</p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/31926819196_5559308de7_z.jpg" width="600" height="400" alt="de blasio nypd new year" /></p> <p>Mayor de Blasio (photo:&nbsp;Michael Appleton/ Mayor's Office)</p> <hr /> <p>At the end of his first year in office, Mayor Bill de Blasio said his new year’s resolution for 2015 was to be on time more often. The chronically late mayor mostly made good on that resolution. At the end of 2015, NY1’s Errol Louis asked de Blasio for a resolution and the mayor didn’t come up with anything on the spot -- I subsequently offered several to him in <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ben-max-new-year-resolutions-bill-de-blasio-article-1.2480119" target="_blank">a Daily News column</a>.</p> <p>He accomplished few of them.</p> <p>As 2016 came to a close, de Blasio didn't make an explicit resolution, but he seems to have settled on better addressing the city’s homelessness crisis as his major area for improvement in 2017.</p> <p>On multiple occasions recently, the mayor has acknowledged that the city has been unsuccessful driving down the shelter census, which has increased significantly during de Blasio’s three years in office, to about 60,000, continuing an upward trend over decades that accelerated under Mayor Michael Bloomberg. While admitting the need to do better, de Blasio has also said the crisis would be even worse but for his administration’s actions, such as increasing rent subsidies and providing lawyers for thousands of tenants facing eviction.</p> <p>When I asked the mayor at a December 29 press conference what mistakes he’s made in 2016 and what he hopes to do differently in 2017, he cited homelessness, but also said, “I’m very tough on myself. I’m very tough on my team...I want perfection from myself, I want perfection from them. But I make mistakes all the time and then I try and fix them. I try and figure out how I can do better. But I don’t make it a point to sort of self-flagellate nor to exaggerate when something goes right. I try and keep an even keel.”</p> <p>He did not offer anything specific beyond homelessness.</p> <p>So, like last year, I am suggesting several new year’s resolutions for Mayor de Blasio. The list would have been slightly different had de Blasio not moved in 2016 to clean up some of his messes: closing down the Campaign for One New York, limiting his meetings with lobbyists, and <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6643-de-blasio-limits-government-contact-with-top-outside-advisor" target="_blank">cutting top outside advisors (“agents of the city”) from government meetings</a>, for example.</p> <p>Still, there are a number of things the mayor can resolve to do better in 2017, if he so chooses:</p> <p><strong>Show, Don’t Tell</strong><br />De Blasio has struggled to portray a strong image as an in-charge, on-top-of-things Mayor. He’s shown more interest in broad themes than nuts-and-bolts operations, though he’s recognized the need to be more present in neighborhoods. While de Blasio has started to hold town hall meetings throughout the city, he is still not as active as he could or should be on-site as city employees carry out essential tasks and provide public services.</p> <p>It doesn’t have to be as hokey as helping fill a pothole, but more activity along those lines would be helpful to New Yorkers, city workers, and de Blasio himself -- both practically and politically. The mayor doesn’t even have to do any of the work, but he could more regularly visit what is happening “in the field,” see how it’s being done, thank those doing it, and show New Yorkers he’s overseeing things up-close.</p> <p><strong>Own Your Accomplishments</strong><br />The mayor should hold more events to showcase his administration’s many accomplishments. Right now the mayor is known for his impressive implementation of universal pre-kindergarten. But, he could be known for much more if he were to put forth a sustained effort to promote and own what his administration is devoting resources to in order to create the more equal city de Blasio wants.</p> <p>Instead of being known solely as The Pre-K Mayor, de Blasio could fairly easily also be known as The Affordable Housing Mayor; The Small Business Mayor; The Gender Equity Mayor; The Street Safety Mayor; The NYCHA Mayor; The Renewable Energy Mayor.</p> <p>Can you imagine de Blasio holding 10 events on one subject within a month? (As, for example, Governor Cuomo just did on the Second Avenue Subway.)</p> <p>I’m not sure de Blasio ever did that on pre-K. And, somehow, he still hasn’t done it on crime, despite the fact that crime has continued to trend downward during his tenure (while he’s also implemented several aspects of criminal justice reform). There are many opportunities to own these accomplishments and others. De Blasio may be closest on street safety (Vision Zero), affordable housing, and crime, but he’s nowhere near “there,” and could be in 2017.</p> <p><strong>Circle the Wagons at the City Council</strong><br />The City Council is key to de Blasio accomplishing some of his goals. The mayor has some stalwart allies in the Council: seven members already endorsed him for re-election, and others are sure to follow. And, de Blasio has made holding a town hall in every Council district a goal and has done a good number so far.</p> <p>But, he’s also faced some tough resistance to certain affordable housing projects, criticism of his management, and other pushback. It’s only natural that as a mayor’s tenure extends some relationships will fray while others blossom. De Blasio needs to make sure that he maintains key relationships, that he works with new Council allies, and that he doesn’t allow too many relationships to deteriorate. It could also benefit him to work on some of the already-frayed relationships -- with, say, City Council Member Rory Lancman, a steady de Blasio critic.</p> <p><strong>Explain Your Plans Better</strong><br />De Blasio has promised a new outline of his fight against homelessness. Why don’t New Yorkers have a better sense of what’s already happening?</p> <p>And, there are other plenty of other problems to tackle, whether citywide, by borough, or in specific neighborhoods. The mayor will surely announce new initiatives during his February State of the City speech, and he has a re-election platform to lay out.</p> <p>Even before he announces new homelessness-fighting measures and puts them together with ongoing programs to show a more complete picture, there has been an avoidable deficiency in how the city’s efforts are presented.</p> <p>Why not hold a press conference to make a detailed, clear presentation of the different pieces and how they fit together -- on homelessness, or transportation equity, or any number of complex subjects? The mayor does this each year for his budget address and he has given multiple education-focused speeches, with accompanying presentation slides. He could easily do this type of thing more often to showcase the steps his administration is taking on key policy issues.</p> <p><strong>Stop Blurring the Lines</strong><br />As with the Campaign for One New York, other efforts that have resulted in law enforcement investigations, and his “agents of the city” declaration, de Blasio has made a pattern of blurring ethical lines, if not crossing legal ones. Even as he’s <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6643-de-blasio-limits-government-contact-with-top-outside-advisor" target="_blank">moved away</a> from some of the more troublesome practices -- like allowing a consultant who has clients with city business to sit in on government meetings -- It happened again when City Hall released a video touting the de Blasio administration’s accomplishments and praising the mayor himself.</p> <p>Instead of taking all kinds of action that require conflicts-of-interest and legal guidance, not to mention rhetorical tap-dancing, de Blasio should resolve to a higher standard.</p> <p><strong>Build and Repair Other Relationships</strong><br />Things are probably beyond repair with Governor Cuomo, but it can only help to inch things in a more positive direction. Likewise Scott Stringer, another fellow Democrat, but the mayor should figure out ways to pull the city comptroller closer -- see, for example, how Cuomo made Attorney General Eric Schneiderman a special prosecutor in police killings of unarmed individuals. One easy way is the private-sector retirement savings program <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6692-federal-government-paves-way-for-city-backed-retirement-savings-program" target="_blank">that the city is developing</a>. There are a host of other potential collaborations that may give the comptroller a little more pause before excoriating the de Blasio administration at every possible turn.</p> <p>There are less far-fetched opportunities for the mayor to build and repair other non-City Council relationships, though. Which state lawmakers should de Blasio look to partner with beyond Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, who must remain a major de Blasio ally? Assemblymembers Michael Blake, Nily Rozic, and Brian Kavanagh make sense; State Senator Liz Krueger is an incredibly obvious ally the mayor should do more with, as is Senator Gustavo Rivera; and why not embrace the handful of Brooklyn state Senators who represent much of the mayor’s base, as well as other Democratic state legislators from across the five boroughs.</p> <p>Then there is the quaint notion of bipartisanship. De Blasio has found some common ground with State Senator Martin Golden, he should find other opportunities to work with Republicans in both city and state government. Staten Island is always a good place for this type of effort. City Council Minority Leader Steve Matteo is the type of elected official who cares far less about political party than he does about getting things done for his constituents -- plenty that can be done with him. This type of work may even help improve the mayor's standing with white New Yorkers, who, according to opinion polls, have strongly unfavorable views of him.</p> <p><strong>Manage Better Before Crises</strong><br />It’s the nature of government (and other sectors) that reforms are made in response to crisis. But, it’s clear from de Blasio’s management style, the city’s ballooning budget, and other evidence, that de Blasio has not made priorities of operational and organizational reforms.</p> <p>Has he asked his deputy mayors and agency commissioners for reimagined org charts, with explanations? Has he asked commissioners to trim the fat at their agencies where they have shifted focus from the prior administration? A little of the latter, but not enough.</p> <p>It can be good to look like you're responding to a crisis with reform, but it's also important to not always look or be so reactive when being more proactive can help prevent problems.</p> <p>The Rivington House sage made it clear that First Deputy Mayor Tony Shorris has too much on his plate. And while Shorris’ office is <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6681-city-hall-hire-to-help-first-deputy-mayor-with-vast-portfolio" target="_blank">bringing in a new high-level administrator</a>, there may be room in 2017 for restructuring the upper management of City Hall, perhaps adding a deputy mayor, which could then lead to a new look at every city agency, how each is being managed, and where improvements can be made. Some new policy ideas could also emerge, and that wouldn’t be half-bad, for the mayor or New Yorkers.</p> <p><strong>Figure Out Your Media Strategy</strong><br />De Blasio has said several times over the years that he has struggled to communicate. He’s rearranged his press strategy several times, made a number of <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6589-in-communications-move-de-blasio-chooses-campaign-over-city-hall" target="_blank">changes to his communications team</a> (a new communications director, his third, is about to start mid-January), and failed to develop any semblance of good will among the City Hall press corps (he hasn’t really tried). De Blasio has significantly limited the occasions on which he takes questions from members of that press corps, and rarely hosts press conferences at City Hall.</p> <p>Most, if not all, members of the media think de Blasio should be more available to the press, of course. The mayor thinks the City Hall press corps ‘doesn’t get it’ and is often stuck on trivial matters, like the mayor’s helicopter rides or law enforcement investigations that de Blasio thinks shouldn’t overshadow the noble work he’s doing. Speaking of something de Blasio finds trivial, there’s been little press attention of late on the mayor’s gym routine, but that’s another good resolution for de Blasio in 2017: find a gym near Gracie Mansion or City Hall, and only visit the Park Slope Y on the weekends. Unfortunately, doing this in 2017 would look like a cynical re-election year ploy, but it would be welcome by many anyway.</p> <p>De Blasio should be more open and frank, with the press and the public. He should hold more press conferences and take more questions when he does hold them. The mayor should give more one-on-one interviews to more outlets, especially if he’s going to continue to limit his press conference Q&amp;As, and he should do more quick "gaggles" with reporters who follow him to public events where he's giving remarks or marching in a parade. And, City Hall should make a more concerted effort to get city commissioners in front of reporters and onto the airwaves.</p> <p>The mayor regularly misses opportunities for “good news” press events, a mystifying pattern since he took office, and another thing that is easily fixable.</p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Ulrich Starts Raising Funds on Message of Beating De Blasio in 2017 2016-10-24T04:00:00+00:00 2016-10-24T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6590:ulrich-starts-raising-funds-on-message-of-beating-de-blasio-in-2017 Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2016/23596859421_e7373a68b5_z.jpg" alt="ulrich de blasio 2017" width="600" height="399" /></p> <p>de Blasio, seated, &amp; Ulrich, to his right (photo: Ed Reed, Mayor's Office)</p> <hr /> <p>He’s not sure he’ll take the plunge, but City Council Member Eric Ulrich is beginning to raise money and test the waters for a possible 2017 mayoral run. The key motivator for Ulrich, a Queens Republican, is his belief that “Mayor de Blasio is destroying and dividing our beloved city.”</p> <p>That is how Ulrich is framing a fundraiser he is holding Tuesday evening, adding of Bill de Blasio, a Democrat, “I believe he can be beat in 2017 but I need your help” on the Facebook <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/1331034403581469/" target="_blank">event page</a>. For the fundraiser, a $1,000 donation puts you on the “dump de Blasio” level.</p> <p>Ulrich, who calls himself a “moderate Republican,” supported Ohio Gov. John Kasich in the Republican presidential primary and readily talks about working across the aisle. He’s holding Tuesday’s event “to raise some money and have a discussion with my supporters and my friends about running next year,” he said during a Monday interview. “I’m seriously considering a run for Mayor,” he said.</p> <p>Explaining that he wants to launch a campaign that is both “a referendum on the mayor” and an opportunity to put forward a different vision from current city leadership, Ulrich said he would model himself after former Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s “bipartisan, independent” approach. Ulrich heaped prasie on Bloomberg during the interview, calling the former mayor “a friend,” and said, “I should hope that I would be half as good as Mike Bloomberg was.”</p> <p>In that vein, Ulrich said he has met with Howard Wolfson, a top Bloomberg aide, and other Bloomberg administration veterans, and that he plans to meet with Bradley Tusk, Bloomberg’s 2009 campaign manager who has launched an independent effort, “NYC Deserves Better,” to find the right candidate to defeat de Blasio.</p> <p>While Tusk has declared he’s looking to back a Democrat in 2017 because he thinks the best path to defeat de Blasio is through the primary, Ulrich said he hopes to get him “to change his theory” and explained what he sees as his wide-ranging appeal: he is fiscally conservative, but also pro-choice, pro-marriage equality, pro-labor, and always ready to work with people of all viewpoints and party affiliations, he said.</p> <p>“I’ve met with Howard Wolfson privately,” Ulrich said of Bloomberg’s top political advisor. “I’m not going to divulge everything we discussed. We talked about next year’s race, and I was very encouraged by the conversation.”</p> <p>Ulrich <a href="http://council.nyc.gov/d32/html/members/home.shtml" target="_blank">represents</a> neighborhoods including Breezy Point, Ozone Park, and Rockaway Beach, and is the chair of the Council’s veterans affairs committee. He said Monday his plan is to bring in several hundred donors and launch a significant fundraising haul with a series of events between now and the next Campaign Finance Board filing in January. Admitting he has hurdles to clear before declaring a run for Mayor and an uphill battle if he does run, Ulrich said he wants to test the waters and, hopefully, take on de Blasio, who is mostly seen as a heavy favorite to win re-election. A key, Ulrich acknowledged, is raising solid early money and showing he can qualify for the city’s public matching funds program.</p> <p>He’s been meeting with political, civic, business, and faith leaders across the city, Ulrich said, “on my own time” (as opposed to when he’s performing his City Council duties). Democrats, Republicans, and independents included, the 31-year-old Council member said, many of whom are supportive, though interested in what kind of campaign he can begin moving before endorsing him or offering concrete help. Ulrich said he hasn’t hired a political consultancy yet, but has had several show interest.</p> <p>Ulrich acknowledges the steep challenge for a Republican in an overwhelmingly Democratic city, but also believes that a strong enough candidate could convince the city’s Republicans, most of its unaffiliated voters, and some of its Democrats to change course from de Blasio. He predicts a good likelihood of major independent expenditure money flooding the race in order to remove de Blasio from office.</p> <p>“Some of the people rumored to run for Mayor, both on the Democratic side and the Republican side, have missed the mark,” Ulrich said. “It’s going to be a referendum on de Blasio -- whether or not people want Bill de Blasio to be a one-term mayor. If you like the direction of the city...vote for Bill de Blasio. If you want to put the city on a different direction...then you’ve got to vote for somebody else.”</p> <p>While he said that “The big albatross around the mayor’s neck is the homeless crisis -- this is an issue that he’s failed to address,” Ulrich listed a few specific issues that he thinks the mayor has not performed on, but appears more focus on pointing to something less tangible, but important.</p> <p>“I think that we’re facing a crisis of confidence,” Ulrich said. “I believe people simply don’t have confidence in the mayor’s ability to do a good job...People just don’t like the guy, and that’s important to being in public office.” Ulrich referenced the investigations into the mayor’s fundraising practices.</p> <p>Allies of the mayor are quick to point out that Ulrich doesn’t have the resume, gravitas, name recognition, or money that Bloomberg had when he won three citywide elections as a Republican or independent.</p> <p>Dan Levitan, a spokesperson for de Blasio’s re-election campaign, said in a statement, “Under Mayor de Blasio, crime just hit another all-time low, jobs are at record highs, the City is building and preserving affordable housing at a record pace, while graduation rates and test scores continue to improve. We are happy to match that record against anyone.”</p> <p>Speaking on Monday, Ulrich gave de Blasio credit for his universal pre-kindergarten program, but said state funding made it possible and that he otherwise doesn’t have anything positive to say for the mayor. He pointed to questions around de Blasio’s education agenda, his mismanagement of the city’s Build It Back Sandy recovery program; said there is low morale in the NYPD, and criticized the mayor for “his combative relationship with the press and the governor.”</p> <p>Ulrich admitted he has big questions to answer, with the fundraising near or at the top. “I’m not going to run to get embarrassed,” he said. “Am I going to give up my seat on the City Council, where I could run for reelection one more time...do I want to give that up to run for Mayor? Only if I really thought there was a path to victory and I could get the support that I needed.”</p> <p>Most experts believe de Blasio has a very strong chance of winning another term. He is popular among Democrats and has many advantages of incumbency. But, he is much <a href="https://poll.qu.edu/new-york-city/release-detail?ReleaseID=2369" target="_blank">less popular </a>among Republicans and unaffiliated voters, and he is deeply unpopular among white New Yorkers, polls show. One question for any de Blasio general election challenger is whether there are enough votes out there to be captured in a city that is heavily Democratic and increasingly made up of people of color.</p> <p><a href="http://www.elections.ny.gov/NYSBOE/enrollment/county/county_apr16.pdf" target="_blank">According to</a> the state Board of Elections, as of April 1, there were just over 4 million active registered voters in New York City: 2.76 million of them Democrats; 460,000 Republicans; 785,700 unaffiliated; and about 162,000 registered with other parties, like the Independence, Green, Working Families, and Conservative parties.</p> <p>Short of viability against de Blasio, unknown for Ulrich is what the Republican primary field will look like. Real estate executive Paul Massey has declared a run, and there are other rumored candidates, but it’s not clear what the city and state GOP leadership are doing in terms of cultivating candidates. Ulrich said he’s had some encouraging conversations with county and club leaders; some people have told him he’d give de Blasio “the best fight,” he said.</p> <p>Ulrich added, “Some of have said, ‘Eric’s a good guy, but we want another rich white guy...a billionaire.’” But, Ulrich said he’s not sure that Bloomberg-like figure is out there -- a strong candidate who can also self-finance. “If we’re tied with CFB funds,” Ulrich said of himself and de Blasio, “I can’t imagine powerful business and civic folks not getting involved” with independent expenditures.</p> <p>“Eric has a lot of talent,” said City Council Member Joseph Borelli, a Staten Island Republican. “The mayor is unpopular in many parts of the city where Eric’s voice could resonate, but it’s early in the process and there are a number of Republicans who’ve expressed interest, and we should be careful with who we nominate.”</p> <p>Borelli and Ulrich come from different wings of the GOP -- Borelli has been a major supporter of Donald Trump’s candidacy, while Ulrich has been in the “never Trump” category and backed Kasich. Ulrich has regularly voted for City Council bills that Borelli and the third Republican in the City Council, Minority Leader Steven Matteo, vote against. Still, if Ulrich is the Republican nominee for Mayor in 2017, it’s all-but-certain that Borelli and other Republicans back him. The question is how much money and enthusiasm Ulrich or any Republican nominee for Mayor can attract -- de Blasio’s 2013 opponent, Joe Lhota, was not the beneficiary of a major rallying of the troops. De Blasio won in a landslide.</p> <p>One place Ulrich could be looking for support is through Tusk and his ambition to unseat de Blasio, who he has called corrupt and incompetent. Asked about the prospect of meeting with and supporting Ulrich, Patrick Muncie, who works at Tusk Strategies and is a spokesperson for NYC Deserves Better, sent Gotham Gazette a statement saying, “While we like and respect Council Member Ulrich, and are happy to meet with him to discuss our shared belief that New Yorkers deserve honest, competent leadership in City Hall, we’re confident the most realistic path [to defeating de Blasio] is through the Democratic primary.”</p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2016/23596859421_e7373a68b5_z.jpg" alt="ulrich de blasio 2017" width="600" height="399" /></p> <p>de Blasio, seated, &amp; Ulrich, to his right (photo: Ed Reed, Mayor's Office)</p> <hr /> <p>He’s not sure he’ll take the plunge, but City Council Member Eric Ulrich is beginning to raise money and test the waters for a possible 2017 mayoral run. The key motivator for Ulrich, a Queens Republican, is his belief that “Mayor de Blasio is destroying and dividing our beloved city.”</p> <p>That is how Ulrich is framing a fundraiser he is holding Tuesday evening, adding of Bill de Blasio, a Democrat, “I believe he can be beat in 2017 but I need your help” on the Facebook <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/1331034403581469/" target="_blank">event page</a>. For the fundraiser, a $1,000 donation puts you on the “dump de Blasio” level.</p> <p>Ulrich, who calls himself a “moderate Republican,” supported Ohio Gov. John Kasich in the Republican presidential primary and readily talks about working across the aisle. He’s holding Tuesday’s event “to raise some money and have a discussion with my supporters and my friends about running next year,” he said during a Monday interview. “I’m seriously considering a run for Mayor,” he said.</p> <p>Explaining that he wants to launch a campaign that is both “a referendum on the mayor” and an opportunity to put forward a different vision from current city leadership, Ulrich said he would model himself after former Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s “bipartisan, independent” approach. Ulrich heaped prasie on Bloomberg during the interview, calling the former mayor “a friend,” and said, “I should hope that I would be half as good as Mike Bloomberg was.”</p> <p>In that vein, Ulrich said he has met with Howard Wolfson, a top Bloomberg aide, and other Bloomberg administration veterans, and that he plans to meet with Bradley Tusk, Bloomberg’s 2009 campaign manager who has launched an independent effort, “NYC Deserves Better,” to find the right candidate to defeat de Blasio.</p> <p>While Tusk has declared he’s looking to back a Democrat in 2017 because he thinks the best path to defeat de Blasio is through the primary, Ulrich said he hopes to get him “to change his theory” and explained what he sees as his wide-ranging appeal: he is fiscally conservative, but also pro-choice, pro-marriage equality, pro-labor, and always ready to work with people of all viewpoints and party affiliations, he said.</p> <p>“I’ve met with Howard Wolfson privately,” Ulrich said of Bloomberg’s top political advisor. “I’m not going to divulge everything we discussed. We talked about next year’s race, and I was very encouraged by the conversation.”</p> <p>Ulrich <a href="http://council.nyc.gov/d32/html/members/home.shtml" target="_blank">represents</a> neighborhoods including Breezy Point, Ozone Park, and Rockaway Beach, and is the chair of the Council’s veterans affairs committee. He said Monday his plan is to bring in several hundred donors and launch a significant fundraising haul with a series of events between now and the next Campaign Finance Board filing in January. Admitting he has hurdles to clear before declaring a run for Mayor and an uphill battle if he does run, Ulrich said he wants to test the waters and, hopefully, take on de Blasio, who is mostly seen as a heavy favorite to win re-election. A key, Ulrich acknowledged, is raising solid early money and showing he can qualify for the city’s public matching funds program.</p> <p>He’s been meeting with political, civic, business, and faith leaders across the city, Ulrich said, “on my own time” (as opposed to when he’s performing his City Council duties). Democrats, Republicans, and independents included, the 31-year-old Council member said, many of whom are supportive, though interested in what kind of campaign he can begin moving before endorsing him or offering concrete help. Ulrich said he hasn’t hired a political consultancy yet, but has had several show interest.</p> <p>Ulrich acknowledges the steep challenge for a Republican in an overwhelmingly Democratic city, but also believes that a strong enough candidate could convince the city’s Republicans, most of its unaffiliated voters, and some of its Democrats to change course from de Blasio. He predicts a good likelihood of major independent expenditure money flooding the race in order to remove de Blasio from office.</p> <p>“Some of the people rumored to run for Mayor, both on the Democratic side and the Republican side, have missed the mark,” Ulrich said. “It’s going to be a referendum on de Blasio -- whether or not people want Bill de Blasio to be a one-term mayor. If you like the direction of the city...vote for Bill de Blasio. If you want to put the city on a different direction...then you’ve got to vote for somebody else.”</p> <p>While he said that “The big albatross around the mayor’s neck is the homeless crisis -- this is an issue that he’s failed to address,” Ulrich listed a few specific issues that he thinks the mayor has not performed on, but appears more focus on pointing to something less tangible, but important.</p> <p>“I think that we’re facing a crisis of confidence,” Ulrich said. “I believe people simply don’t have confidence in the mayor’s ability to do a good job...People just don’t like the guy, and that’s important to being in public office.” Ulrich referenced the investigations into the mayor’s fundraising practices.</p> <p>Allies of the mayor are quick to point out that Ulrich doesn’t have the resume, gravitas, name recognition, or money that Bloomberg had when he won three citywide elections as a Republican or independent.</p> <p>Dan Levitan, a spokesperson for de Blasio’s re-election campaign, said in a statement, “Under Mayor de Blasio, crime just hit another all-time low, jobs are at record highs, the City is building and preserving affordable housing at a record pace, while graduation rates and test scores continue to improve. We are happy to match that record against anyone.”</p> <p>Speaking on Monday, Ulrich gave de Blasio credit for his universal pre-kindergarten program, but said state funding made it possible and that he otherwise doesn’t have anything positive to say for the mayor. He pointed to questions around de Blasio’s education agenda, his mismanagement of the city’s Build It Back Sandy recovery program; said there is low morale in the NYPD, and criticized the mayor for “his combative relationship with the press and the governor.”</p> <p>Ulrich admitted he has big questions to answer, with the fundraising near or at the top. “I’m not going to run to get embarrassed,” he said. “Am I going to give up my seat on the City Council, where I could run for reelection one more time...do I want to give that up to run for Mayor? Only if I really thought there was a path to victory and I could get the support that I needed.”</p> <p>Most experts believe de Blasio has a very strong chance of winning another term. He is popular among Democrats and has many advantages of incumbency. But, he is much <a href="https://poll.qu.edu/new-york-city/release-detail?ReleaseID=2369" target="_blank">less popular </a>among Republicans and unaffiliated voters, and he is deeply unpopular among white New Yorkers, polls show. One question for any de Blasio general election challenger is whether there are enough votes out there to be captured in a city that is heavily Democratic and increasingly made up of people of color.</p> <p><a href="http://www.elections.ny.gov/NYSBOE/enrollment/county/county_apr16.pdf" target="_blank">According to</a> the state Board of Elections, as of April 1, there were just over 4 million active registered voters in New York City: 2.76 million of them Democrats; 460,000 Republicans; 785,700 unaffiliated; and about 162,000 registered with other parties, like the Independence, Green, Working Families, and Conservative parties.</p> <p>Short of viability against de Blasio, unknown for Ulrich is what the Republican primary field will look like. Real estate executive Paul Massey has declared a run, and there are other rumored candidates, but it’s not clear what the city and state GOP leadership are doing in terms of cultivating candidates. Ulrich said he’s had some encouraging conversations with county and club leaders; some people have told him he’d give de Blasio “the best fight,” he said.</p> <p>Ulrich added, “Some of have said, ‘Eric’s a good guy, but we want another rich white guy...a billionaire.’” But, Ulrich said he’s not sure that Bloomberg-like figure is out there -- a strong candidate who can also self-finance. “If we’re tied with CFB funds,” Ulrich said of himself and de Blasio, “I can’t imagine powerful business and civic folks not getting involved” with independent expenditures.</p> <p>“Eric has a lot of talent,” said City Council Member Joseph Borelli, a Staten Island Republican. “The mayor is unpopular in many parts of the city where Eric’s voice could resonate, but it’s early in the process and there are a number of Republicans who’ve expressed interest, and we should be careful with who we nominate.”</p> <p>Borelli and Ulrich come from different wings of the GOP -- Borelli has been a major supporter of Donald Trump’s candidacy, while Ulrich has been in the “never Trump” category and backed Kasich. Ulrich has regularly voted for City Council bills that Borelli and the third Republican in the City Council, Minority Leader Steven Matteo, vote against. Still, if Ulrich is the Republican nominee for Mayor in 2017, it’s all-but-certain that Borelli and other Republicans back him. The question is how much money and enthusiasm Ulrich or any Republican nominee for Mayor can attract -- de Blasio’s 2013 opponent, Joe Lhota, was not the beneficiary of a major rallying of the troops. De Blasio won in a landslide.</p> <p>One place Ulrich could be looking for support is through Tusk and his ambition to unseat de Blasio, who he has called corrupt and incompetent. Asked about the prospect of meeting with and supporting Ulrich, Patrick Muncie, who works at Tusk Strategies and is a spokesperson for NYC Deserves Better, sent Gotham Gazette a statement saying, “While we like and respect Council Member Ulrich, and are happy to meet with him to discuss our shared belief that New Yorkers deserve honest, competent leadership in City Hall, we’re confident the most realistic path [to defeating de Blasio] is through the Democratic primary.”</p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>