Gotham Gazette http://www.gothamgazette.com/component/tags/tag/1887 Tue, 12 Dec 2017 08:22:01 +0000 en-gb webmaster@gothamgazette.com (Webmaster) Two Months On, Buffalo Billion Investigator’s Contract Remains a Mystery http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6408:nearly-two-months-on-buffalo-billion-investigator-s-contract-remains-a-mystery http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6408:nearly-two-months-on-buffalo-billion-investigator-s-contract-remains-a-mystery cuomo buffalo main st

Gov. Cuomo (photo: The Governor's Office)


It has been two months since Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that Bartz Schwartz would conduct an “independent review” of the state’s signature Buffalo Billion economic development program and yet Schwartz’s contract with the state remains either unfinished or under wraps. On April 29, following the news that U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara had subpoenaed some of Cuomo’s closest allies in conjunction with an investigation into bid-rigging and other possible improprieties, Cuomo and Schwartz released a joint statement announcing that the former U.S. attorney was being hired.

Cuomo administration officials have repeatedly failed to respond to Gotham Gazette inquiries about the status of Schwartz’s contract since he was appointed. On May 24, Cuomo told reporters that the contract had yet been finalized, but that he would make it public when it was. Without seeing Schwartz’s contract it is impossible to know exactly what he has been tasked to review; the terms of his investigation; who he reports to; and how much Schwartz’s services are costing taxpayers.

Schwartz’s contract must legally be made public if it involves the use of taxpayer money.

“The contract should be made public,” said Dick Dadey, executive director of Citizens Union, a government reform group. “There hasn't been any kind of information on his retention and that is disappointing and inexplicable. The longer this drags out the more we have to question the arrangement.”

Watchdog groups note that Schwartz’s role could have been filled by numerous other existing state entities that investigate corruption, including Comptroller Tom DiNapoli, whose office oversees state finances and contracting. On Tuesday evening, The Times Union reported that Cuomo has empowered Schwartz under the Moreland Act, giving him "the power to issue civil subpoenas," which the Cuomo administration confirmed, though it still declined to make any documentation public. A Cuomo spokesperson told The Times Union that Schwartz's contract was still being finalized and that when it is done, it will be submitted to DiNapoli and made public.

In a statement to The Times Union, a Cuomo spokesperson said of Schwartz's review of the state economic development programs and development of new guidelines for fund disbersement, "Both processes are ongoing and, as the guidelines are being drafted, Mr. Schwartz has closely examined and signed off on payments before they were released. This is important work and we thank him for promptly commencing his review. It is also a complex and unique assignment and we expect the contract to be finalized and sent to the (state) comptroller shortly."

Anonymous Cuomo administration officials have been referenced in various publications saying that Schwartz is reviewing and approving all contracts and cash flow related to the Buffalo Billion and other economic development projects. For the second time this year, payments to the SolarCity project were recently made late and led to talk of possible layoffs and disruption of the project. An anonymous Cuomo administration official told The Buffalo News that Schwartz approved the cash for the project and that it was delayed during a review by DiNapoli. The comptroller’s office later denied it had anything to do with the delay.

The firm handling Bart Schwartz’s public relations declined to comment on the status of his contract, but pointed to Schwartz’s statement from April. “The state has reason to believe that in certain programs and regulatory approvals they may have been defrauded by improper bidding and failures to disclose potential conflicts of interest by lobbyists and former state employees,” Schwartz wrote, in apparent reference to Cuomo associates Joseph Percoco and Todd Howe.

“As the state needs to continue operating these important programs, they have asked me to commence an immediate review of all grants and approvals – past, current and future – in certain programs and operations including the Buffalo Billion/Nano Economic Development Program,” Schwartz wrote.

When asked on May 24 if Schwartz’s findings would be made public, Cuomo said that decision would be up to Schwartz, but Cuomo’s press office later clarified the report would be made public as long as the U.S. attorney’s office approved.

“Is he working as a volunteer or getting paid without a contract? Will the public ever know?” asked John Kaehny, executive director of Reinvent Albany, a watchdog group that tracks the Buffalo Billion. “What exactly does [Schwartz] do for the governor?”

***
by David King, Albany editor, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

Note: this article has been updated with new information as reported by The Times Union.

Note: Gotham Gazette is an independent publication of Citizens Union Foundation, sister organization of Citizens Union.

]]>
Two Months On, Buffalo Billion Investigator’s Contract Remains a Mystery Tue, 21 Jun 2016 04:00:00 +0000
For Review, Cuomo Chooses Outside Agent Over Existing State Investigators http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6377:for-review-cuomo-chooses-outside-agent-instead-of-existing-state-investigators http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6377:for-review-cuomo-chooses-outside-agent-instead-of-existing-state-investigators schneiderman cuomo moreland corruption

Scheiderman, left, & Cuomo, center (photo via The Governor's Office on Flickr)


More than a month after Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that Bart Schwartz, a former federal prosecutor, would head an “independent investigation” into the Buffalo Billion economic development program, it remains unclear whether Schwartz has begun his work and the governor has repeatedly said that his contract with the state is still being finalized. The Buffalo Billion project and other pieces of Cuomo’s economic development programs have drawn scrutiny from the U.S. Attorney and Attorney General Eric Schneiderman due to allegations including bid-rigging that favored large Cuomo donors.

This past week, the State Inspector General’s office issued a report on the source of a leak about an investigation into Mayor Bill de Blasio’s fundraising practices at the State Board of Elections. By all accounts the investigation was conducted expeditiously.The Joint Commission on Public Ethics is also involved in a de Blasio matter as it probes his allies’ lobbying practices. These matters, not to mention the existence of the Attorney General and Comptroller, make it clear that state government already has a number of investigative bodies that would not have required extended contract negotiations and monetary compensation to conduct an investigation of the Buffalo Billion. But, Cuomo decided not to call on an existing investigative body to look at all aspects of his major economic development programs.

Gov. Cuomo’s office did not respond to questions about why an existing agency was not selected. Schwartz’s office declined to respond to questions about whether he had a contract and how many staff he would bring to his review of state economic development programming.

Schwartz’s role is murky given that the U.S. Attorney and Attorney General are now both pursuing widespread investigations. It is unclear what he can do investigatively that won’t interfere with active probes. Government watchdogs say that Schwartz’s appointment would have had an impact when concerns about the bidding process were initially raised, but at this point many believe Cuomo is simply trying to obscure the scope of the federal probe and claim high ground as state integrity is questioned.

“Schwartz’s investigation was triggered by a criminal probe. If he had been brought in years ago, that would have been a different thing,” said John Kaehny, executive director of Reinvent Albany.

Jennifer Rodgers, a former federal prosecutor and head of Columbia Law School’s Center for the Advancement of Public Integrity sees value in Schwartz’s hiring. “There are two things Bart Schwartz brings to the table: independence and resources,” Rodgers said.

“JCOPE is constantly tagged as not independent, and the state IG is ostensibly independent although appointed by the Governor,” noted Rodgers, adding that Schwartz’s firm, Guidepost Solutions, “has all the experts he might need to examine such a complex system: lawyers, former law enforcement officials, computer people - people with a set of skills that the IG and JCOPE would be hard-pressed to bring together.”

While Cuomo has said Schwartz will take a soup-to-nuts approach to his review, no one will know exactly what he is tasked with and how his work will be done until his contract is finalized and made public.

Schwartz’s firm details its approach to internal investigations on its website:

“Guidepost Solutions is frequently called upon by businesses to conduct internal investigations into allegations or suspicions of corrupt or fraudulent conduct by employees. We rely upon our full-time staff of attorneys, forensic accountants, research analysts, field investigators and computer forensics experts to staff these assignments, and we work collaboratively with our business clients to develop an investigative plan that is appropriate to the suspected misconduct...Since most of our investigative professionals have had experience in federal, state and local law enforcement—as prosecutors, auditors and agents—our investigative strategies are developed with an understanding of the evidence that may be needed to support an eventual criminal prosecution.”

The section goes on to state that the team is “equally sensitive to matters of confidentiality and public perception.”

Blair Horner, legislative director of the New York Public Interest Research Group (NYPIRG), said that Gov. Cuomo had a full menu of options to choose from before even considering Schwartz. “The governor had a toolbox he could have gone to to review this, but instead he went out and bought a new hammer.” Critics of the state's approach to economic development, including the Buffalo Billion, have repeatedly said that the state Comptroller should have more oversight of contracts and spending - something Comptroller Tom DiNapoli recently addressed in a series of proposals.

Horner said that the arrangement with Schwartz could technically allow Cuomo to address issues faster than if the IG’s office was investigating.

“Schwartz reports directly to him, so in theory it would all happen faster, although the IG did just turn a report around in a few weeks,” said Horner, referring to the investigation of the BOE leak. “The IG would have to issue a report and the IG would have to act.”

In other words, if the IG’s office was investigating the case the governor wouldn’t be able to fix anything until after a report was released, and the IG would have to recommend actions to be taken, which could include civil cases or referrals to law enforcement agencies for violations of the law, according to New York Executive Law section 53.

The Cuomo administration has said Schwartz will have the ability to review contracts and control cash flow, while also looking for larger fixes to the system, giving him a more proactive role than standard investigators. In an April 29 statement announcing his impending hire, Schwartz said that given the investigation and the administration’s desire to keep the Buffalo Billion program running, “they have asked me to commence an immediate review of all grants and approvals – past, current and future – in certain programs and operations,including the Buffalo Billion/Nano Economic Development Program.”

“It’s belt and suspenders, but I’d rather have it that way,” Cuomo told reporters in New York City last week, referring to redundancy and noting that he will consider making changes to economic development programs depending on the findings. Cuomo aides have periodically reminded reporters that Schwartz will also have direct approval of contracts and cash allocations. No one has confirmed whether Schwartz has indeed begun his work.

Last week, when asked if Schwartz’s report would be made public Cuomo appeared less sure of what Schwartz would be doing and admitted he had yet to secure a contract with him. “He is being hired as an independent to do an independent review,” said Cuomo. “I don’t know what his standard protocol is. I wouldn’t have a problem with [making his findings public], but I don’t know how he operates.”

Cuomo’s aides later clarified Schwartz’s report would be made public if it didn’t interfere with the U.S. Attorney’s investigation. It is unclear if there has been communication between Schwartz and U.S. Attorney Bharara’s office.

Kaehny of Reinvent Albany said he finds it a “stretch of the imagination” to think the governor could appoint someone to investigate the Buffalo Billion matter when the crux of the federal investigation appears to hinge on whether contracts were exchanged for major donations to the governor’s campaign.

“He could have asked the Attorney General and Comptroller to jointly choose an investigator and signed an MOU [memo of understanding] that would give them access to the documents they need. It would have been highly credible, people would believe it.” He noted that “most observers don’t think of the IG or JCOPE as independent” and so wouldn’t have the ability to “give the governor a clean bill of health.”

Rodgers said a joint investigation by Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, both Democrats like Cuomo who are known to have strained relationships with the governor, could have appeared independent but the relational friction could have prevented the governor from wanting to hand them the keys to his signature economic development program. She noted both offices would have the resources necessary for an investigation the scope of the Buffalo Billion.

The main question surrounding Schwartz’s usefulness in the matter remains exactly what Cuomo has tasked him with investigating. Cuomo has repeatedly said that Bharara’s investigation focuses on two men, longtime associates Todd Howe and Joseph Percoco, something disputed by those familiar with the investigation.

On Thursday Cuomo was asked whether he has been told by the U.S. Attorney’s Office that its probe focuses on only a few people. Cuomo said that he hadn’t but that he believes the actions of a few people are at issue.

“Our investigator will talk to hundreds of people, but it’s about the actions of several people,” Cuomo said, adding that he would consider changes to economic development practices if Schwartz’s indicates they are necessary.

“There are major question marks around the scope of his engagement and the access he will get,” Rodgers said of Schwartz. “He has the tools and independence, but what was he asked to do with them? That is why it's so important we see a contract.”

While Schwartz’s role has remained unclear, U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara’s investigation into alleged bid-rigging in Cuomo’s economic development initiative appears to be quickly expanding; last week the U.S. Attorney’s office and Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's office conducted a joint raid on the headquarters of SUNY Polytechnic, the organization that oversees Buffalo Billion contracting. The raid appeared partly targeted at the office of Howe, a Cuomo ally and lobbyist, who has lobbied the administration while also representing semi-governmental entities and remaining close with key players in the Cuomo administration.

A recent Wall Street Journal story revealed emails showing that Howe, someone Cuomo himself has said is a target of the probe, had a close hand in guiding SUNY Poly head Alain Kaloyeros as well as directing conversations with the governor’s top aides about how to do so. Cuomo insisted last month that he wasn’t close friends with Howe. On Thursday he said otherwise, telling reporters “I know Todd Howe. I’ve known him for many years. He worked for nano, he’s worked on a lot of these projects. But it’s also irrelevant. If anyone does anything improper, they will be punished to the fullest extent of the law, period.”

Kaehny said that Schwartz’s appointment has in a way already failed the administration. “The problem Schwartz faced from the very first moment is that his client is the governor, and the people targeted by subpoenas are extremely close to the governor,” said Kaehny, adding that it is hard to have faith in an investigation launched by the governor himself. However, it won’t be clear exactly what kind of investigation Schwartz is undertaking until his contract is made public, if one is indeed signed.

***
by David King, Albany editor, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

]]>
For Review, Cuomo Chooses Outside Agent Over Existing State Investigators Sun, 05 Jun 2016 04:00:00 +0000
Role of Cuomo’s ‘Independent Investigator’ Remains Unclear http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6363:role-of-cuomo-s-independent-investigator-remains-unclear http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=6363:role-of-cuomo-s-independent-investigator-remains-unclear cuomo purple tie

Gov. Cuomo (photo: Kevin P. Coughlin, Governor's Office)


In trying to stifle the blaze that has become U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara’s investigation into the Buffalo Billion economic development program, Governor Andrew Cuomo has repeatedly invoked the name of Bart Schwartz, a former federal prosecutor the administration has retained (or is in the process of retaining) to carry out an “independent” review of the project.

In acknowledging that people close to him were being investigated in relation to the Buffalo Billion, Cuomo announced Schwartz’s hire on April 29.

When the Public Authorities Control Board met this week and approved without debate another $485 million for a key Buffalo Billion project, the administration quickly reminded reporters that Schwartz would now provide another layer of oversight by considering approval of disbursement of the funds.

The day before, Cuomo told reporters he had yet to finalize Schwartz’s contract. The governor also appeared unsure whether Schwartz would make his findings public. Administration officials later clarified Schwartz would release his findings as long as doing so wouldn’t interfere with Bharara’s investigation, which appears to be focused on bid-rigging and a web of relationships among private and public entities.

Even as Schwartz’s presence is held up as a measure of confidence in the Cuomo administration and the state’s vast economic development apparatus, several questions about Schwartz’s role and power remain. These include whether Schwartz has already started his work; when his contract will be available to the public; if his efforts are duplicative of the U.S. attorney’s office’s; and what authority Schwartz will invoke to audit the nonprofits that oversee the Buffalo Billion, which are said to be independent from the Governor’s Office.

Both the Cuomo administration and Schwartz’s recently-hired public relations firm failed to respond to Gotham Gazette’s questions about Schwartz’s role.

“In the real world someone doesn’t start work before they have a contract,” said Blair Horner of The New York Public Interest Research Group.

In conjunction with Cuomo's office, Schwartz issued a statement April 29 detailing some of his plans and saying he would begin immediately.

“The state has reason to believe that in certain programs and regulatory approvals they may have been defrauded by improper bidding and failures to disclose potential conflicts of interest by lobbyists and former state employees,” Schwartz wrote, in apparent reference to Cuomo associates Joseph Percoco and Todd Howe.

“As the state needs to continue operating these important programs, they have asked me to commence an immediate review of all grants and approvals – past, current and future – in certain programs and operations including the Buffalo Billion/Nano Economic Development Program,” Schwartz wrote.

It remains unclear exactly what Schwartz will be reviewing and how he will conduct his work. Part of the uncertainty and unease around Schwartz’s role held by some stems from Cuomo’s messaging around the investigation and various long-standing concerns about the Buffalo Billion.

There are three major questions about the Buffalo Billion raised by watchdogs and, it seems, Bharara’s office: Was the contracting process designed to benefit Cuomo campaign donors? Did Cuomo loyalists use their connections to play both sides of the contracting process? Are SUNY Polytechnic, the college that oversees the distribution of Buffalo Billion funds, and its associated nonprofits doing enough to make sure corporations like SolarCIty make good on their jobs promises and other deliverables. SolarCity recently appeared to revise the number of jobs it expects to host in its Buffalo Billion-funded factory and pushed back the factory’s open date.

Cuomo himself appears to have introduced a fourth question, which goes something like: Did someone steal money? It's a question watchdogs see as misdirection given that many of them doubt any money was actually secretly taken by lobbyists or contractors - they are more concerned about contracts being awarded improperly.

While Cuomo is calling it a measure to ensure integrity, Schwartz’s appointment is seen as a smokescreen by many legislators and watchdogs who are concerned about the Buffalo Billion. The governor has continued to tell the press that the investigations by Bharara and Schwartz will examine the possible wrongdoing of “one or two” individuals while analysts say Bharara’s subpoenas indicate an investigation into systemic corruption.

“This is a major effort the state is running that is working extraordinarily well and is vitally important to upstate New York,” Cuomo told reporters in Syracuse on Wednesday of the Buffalo Billion. “There is no reason to stop investing in upstate New York, to hurt the upstate economy, because a couple of people may or may not have done something wrong.” He went on to say: “You have questions raised about the conduct of several individuals. That’s now being investigated by the U.S. attorney. We also started our own internal investigation by a former prosecutor.”

Cuomo has also said he will “throw the book” at anyone found to have violated the public trust, and that he holds every Buffalo Billion dollar as “sacred.”

Without seeing Schwartz’s contract it won’t be possible to ascertain what Cuomo has actually tasked him with investigating. It also won’t be clear what the public is actually paying him to investigate a project that watchdogs say should have already been monitored by the state Comptroller.

“It’s ironic that [Cuomo] has gone out and hired someone who apparently will have access to contracts and information that the Comptroller of New York, who is independent, doesn’t have access to,” said E.J. McMahon, president of the Empire Center for Public Policy. McMahon did note that Schwartz isn’t “political” or “one of the governor’s people,” though.

When Schwartz’s role was first announced on April 29, Cuomo Counsel Alphonso David said of the Buffalo Billion, “Any grants made by this program will be thoroughly scrutinized – past, current or future.” David’s statement accompanied Schwartz’s in the same release to the media.

Schwartz may indeed be performing duties that once belonged to the Comptroller, Thomas DiNapoli, who was formerly allowed to review SUNY and CUNY contracts. That ability was stripped by Cuomo and the Legislature in 2011. SUNY Polytechnic has created two nonprofits to distribute state cash to various economic development projects across New York.

John Kaehny of Reinvent Albany, a group that has been closely tracking the Buffalo Billion, said that it is unclear to him what problems the governor has asked Schwartz to examine, especially because Schwartz’s contract has yet to be made public. “Where is his contract? Exactly what does it say?” Kaehny asked, wondering whether Schwartz is focused on everyday expenditures or aspects of possible pay-to-play and conflict of interest in the awarding of contracts.

After news broke this month that Bharara had subpoenaed Cuomo’s office, DiNapoli unveiled a series of reform proposals that watchdogs say would upend how the Buffalo Billion is administered and overseen by the state. His plan would ban lump sum appropriations, create a council to plan capital spending, and require economic development program proposals to be scored and ranked in a public database.

“Public authorities are not subject to the same checks and balances that apply to state agencies, resulting in hundreds of millions of dollars being spent annually with limited oversight,” reads a release from DiNapoli’s office detailing the reforms. “DiNapoli’s proposal would require state-funded public authority projects to be scored and ranked using measurable and objective criteria. His proposal also requires more disclosure of public authorities’ spending and financing activities.”

DiNapoli also recently indicated that he may investigate parts of the Buffalo Billion.

“Why, other than Cuomo saying so and Schwartz saying so, is there any reason to think that Schwartz is completely independent of the governor's office?” asked Kaehny. “Schwartz is not a court appointed monitor, nor is he reporting to a board of directors. He is effectively reporting to a CEO with no board whose top associates are under federal investigation.”

Dick Dadey, executive director of government reform group Citizens Union, said it is critical for the integrity of Schwartz’s work to make the terms of his employment clear. “If this investigation is about transparency it should start by making this contract public to reassure people that there will not be a repeat of the Moreland Commission where the governor promised independence but abruptly shuttered it.”

Cuomo told reporters on Tuesday “We're doing a contract that's being finalized now. When it's finalized we’ll give it to you.” He added negotiations were about “the dollars.”

The use of nonprofits to disburse government funds has led many to question the application of state procurement rules requiring an open request for proposals process. The RFPs for two major Buffalo Billion projects appeared tailored for the two firms that won them, both of which donated generously to Cuomo.

Kaehny, in a press release, asked members of the Public Authorities Control Board, a five-member group appointed by the governor, four of whom are recommended by heads of the Legislature’s majority and minority conferences, that is tasked with approving funding for state economic development projects, to pose that very question in their meeting on Wednesday. It was not asked.

However, the Assembly Democrats' representative on the board said she was voting for disbursing the funds with several conditions of more transparency and oversight.

SUNY Poly has previously insisted that the nonprofits do abide by those rules.

“SUNY Poly and our related entities follow New York state government’s well-established and legally defined procurement procedures — to the letter,” David Doyle, a spokesman for SUNY Poly, told the Times Union in a September letter.

State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s office declined to comment on whether the office believes the law actually applies to the nonprofits.

For the first time, on Wednesday Cuomo denied having influenced the contracting process for the Buffalo Billion. “The way it worked...the state didn't do any of the contracts," Cuomo was quoted as saying by The Post Standard. "It's all done through SUNY, the state university system. They are the ones that actually managed the contracting process. They are the ones who ran the contracts, ran the competitions, made the selections," he said. "I had absolutely nothing to do with that. It was done by SUNY.”

However, as Cuomo distances himself from SUNY Poly and its decisions in contracting, his appointment of Schwartz brings into question just how much control the governor does have over the SUNY nonprofits. It appears, in a sense, by hiring Schwartz Cuomo is saying he has direct authority over all the entities involved despite legal and rhetorical framework painting them as independent.

Kaehny said he doesn’t believe Cuomo has “the legal authority” to direct the Empire State Development Corporation or SUNY’s nonprofits to allow Schwartz to review their contracts or approve them. “ESDC is a public authority with a legally independent board and the nonprofits also have legally independent boards,” said Kaehny. “If they want to vote to subject themselves to control by Schwartz, they could do that, but that would be abdicating their fiduciary duty to a consultant to the governor, which raises questions of separation of powers. Are these entities independent of the governor or not? If they are not, then why are they exempt from state contracting and conflict of interest rules?”

SUNY Poly and a representative of Fort Schuyler Management, one of SUNY Poly’s nonprofits that administers the Buffalo Billion, failed to return requests for comment on whether Schwartz had begun his work and whether the boards of Fort Schuyler Management and Fuller Road Management had decided to give Schwartz access to their decision making processes.

On Tuesday Cuomo was asked about the scrutiny of his use of nonprofits and whether he would consider changing the process. “What's interesting is that all predated me, right?” Cuomo said to reporters. “That went back to Governor Pataki, who was a saint. That was all in place and we used the existing mechanism; we did not design that mechanism.”

Watchdogs say this is another misdirection by Cuomo as the particular system he has used to expedite Buffalo Billion was pioneered by SUNY Poly head Alain Kaloyeros during Cuomo’s time in office.

“The governor said the structure was here when he got here,” said McMahon of the Empire Center. “That isn’t true. It was set up by a very ambitious college president [Kaloyeros] who wanted to expedite the construction of his empire. The governor has used it because he can get done what he wants to get done faster. It avoids the niceties that usually go into spending public money.”

Dadey said there should be no mistake that Schwartz’s full task is to examine systemic issues in the Buffalo Billion and not just look for possible wrongdoing. “The SUNY cartel is hard to follow and that is a problem. Bart Schwartz's task is not just to find out if someone did something wrong, but to examine this opaque system and suggest ways to improve it, so voters can have faith in it.”

***
by David King, Albany editor, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

Note: Gotham Gazette is an independent publication of Citizens Union Foundation, sister organization of Citizens Union.

]]>
Role of Cuomo’s ‘Independent Investigator’ Remains Unclear Thu, 26 May 2016 04:00:00 +0000