Gotham Gazette Gotham Gazette is an online publication covering New York policy and politics as well as news on public safety, transportation, education, finance and more. http://www.gothamgazette.com/component/tags/tag/city-council 2018-09-21T19:45:32+00:00 Webmaster webmaster@gothamgazette.com The Week Ahead in New York Politics, September 17 2018-09-16T04:00:00+00:00 2018-09-16T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7935:the-week-ahead-in-new-york-politics-september-17 Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" alt="New York City Hall" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>This week will start with a lot of focus on continuing the primary election analysis and pivoting to the general election matchups for statewide and legislative seats. Some of the focus will surely be on how <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7931-2018-new-york-state-primary-election-results" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the winners</a> pulled their victories off and why the losers lost, but also whether and how those who lost Democratic primaries but have other ballot lines for November will vacate those lines. Chief among them are Cynthia Nixon and Jumaane Williams on the Working Families Party line, but also Jeff Klein and other former members of the Independent Democratic Conference who lost their Democratic primaries but have ballot lines from small parties like the Independence Party or Women’s Equality Party.</p> <p>As the general election quickly swings into gear -- as of Sunday there were just 50 days until Election Day, November 6! -- the race for governor turns into a contest among Governor Andrew Cuomo, Republican nominee Marc Molinaro, Howie Hawkins of the Green Party, Libertarian Party nominee Larry Sharpe, and Stephanie Minor, running on her newly created Serve America Movement line. Nixon may also be on the ballot, but she is very likely not to campaign if she is. Or, she might be moved off the WFP line, possibly replaced by Cuomo if the warring factions can agree that they will work together to avoid creating a better path to victory for Molinaro or another candidate.</p> <p>The governor and lieutenant governor nominees of the different parties now run as a ticket, so after Kathy Hochul survived her challenge from Jumaane Williams, she can now work with Cuomo to win in November. There were no statewide primaries beyond three in the Democratic Party, with the lone exception of a Reform Party primary for its Attorney General nominee, which will be Nancy Sliwa.</p> <p>The Attorney General race is now among Democratic nominee Letitia James, Republican Keith Wofford, Green candidate Michael Sussman, and Sliwa of the Reform Party. The Comptroller race features incumbent Democrat Tom DiNapoli, who did not face a primary challenge, as well as Republican nominee Jonathan Trichter, and Green nominee Mark Dunlea.</p> <p>Control of the state Senate will be on the ballot this November, with races in New York City and elsewhere determining which party has the majority come next year. And, competitive New York races for the House of Representatives will help determine which party controls that chamber come January. There is also the race between New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and her Republican challenger Chele Farley, as well as various state Assembly race, though that house of the Legislature is overwhelmingly Democratic and will remain so regardless of how a few competitive races may go.</p> <p>There’s also government happening this week, as well as other interesting events not directly related to this year’s elections. For example, the 2019 Charter Revision Commission held <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7932-2019-charter-revision-commission-holds-first-public-hearing" target="_blank" rel="noopener">its first public hearing</a> this past week and has two more this week, and the City Council has a variety of hearings this week.&nbsp;See our day-by-day rundown below.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>e-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>Monday<br /></strong>On Monday morning, Mayor de Blasio will speak at&nbsp;at the Fifth Annual Brooklyn Dems Post Primary Breakfast Reception at Junior's. In the evening, the Mayor will appear on NY1’s Inside City Hall in the 7 and 11 p.m. hours.</p> <p>At the City Council on Monday:<br />--The Subcommittee on Zoning and Franchises will meet at 9:30 a.m.<br />--The Committee on Technology will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss proposed laws relating to agency data, including the “digitization of historic data,” as well as laws relating to protections for cable subscribers.<br />--The Committees on Immigration and Youth Services will meet jointly at 10 a.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “LGBTQ immigrant youth in New York City,” as well as a proposed law requiring the city to “create a plan of action to protect children who qualify for special immigrant juvenile status.”<br />--The Committee on For-Hire Vehicles will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss several proposed laws relating to, among other things, benefits for FHV and taxi drivers, “addressing the problem of medallion owner debt,” financial education for drivers, creating an “Office of Inclusion” in the Taxi and Limousine Commission, and “deductions from certain for-hire driver earnings.” City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will deliver opening remarks.<br />--The Subcommittee on Landmarks, Public Siting, and Maritime Uses will meet at noon.<br />--The Committee on Parks and Recreation will meet at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “the state of the City’s jointly operated playgrounds.”<br />--The Committee on Fire and Emergency Management will meet at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “EMS respond to the opioid epidemic,” as well as to discuss a proposed law relating to “creating online applications for fire alarm plan examinations.”<br />--The Committees on Aging and Civil &amp; Human Rights will meet jointly at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “age discrimination in the workplace.”<br />--The Subcommittee on Planning, Dispositions, and Concessions will meet at 2 p.m.</p> <p>The New York State Board of Regents will meet on Monday and Tuesday.</p> <p>On Monday morning, Comptroller Tom DiNapoli will release his annual report on Wall Street performance and compensation.</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Monday in City Hall Park, “Two New York City unions representing more than 4,700 Emergency Medical Service professionals will stand in the shadow of City Hall...to demand that Mayor Bill de Blasio support unlimited sick leave for EMS responders who suffered health ailments as a result of serving at Ground Zero after the 9/11 attacks. Local 2507, which represents 4,200 Uniformed Emergency Medical Technicians, Paramedics, and Fire Inspectors, and Local 3621, which represents 505 Uniformed EMS Officers, including Captains and Lieutenants, then will testify at a hearing at 250 Broadway about the need for State legislation that will grant affected EMS workers unlimited sick time due to their work in the recovery operation after 9/11.”</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Monday,&nbsp;Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul will deliver remarks at a Vital Brooklyn playground opening, at The Winthrop Campus School. At 2 p.m., Hochul will announce the recipients of the New York State Police Officer of the Year Award at Yonkers City Hall.</p> <p>At 11 a.m. Monday at City Hall, “First Lady Chirlane McCray, Chair of the Mayor’s Fund, Commissioner of Immigrant Affairs Bitta Mostofi and Commissioner of the Department of Social Services Steven Banks will be joined by the City employees who have returned from volunteering to provide pro bono assistance to immigrant children and families in detention in Dilley, Texas. The delegation, which was made possible by funding from the Mayor’s Fund, includes lawyers and licensed clinical social workers. This event is open press. There will be Q-and-A.”</p> <p>At 11 a.m. Monday on Long Island, “Senate Majority Leader John Flanagan...will be joined by the Senate Majority’s Long Island Delegation at a press conference...at the Bethpage Train Station to call for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) to put any proposed 2019 fare hike on hold until it makes measurable improvements in service, equipment failures and delays. The press conference will introduce legislation sponsored by Senator Elaine Phillips...and Assemblyman Dean Murray...to protect commuters from facing even more disruptions due to the LIRR’s loss of any revenue. The delegation, led by Senator Phillips, has also established a petition drive that enables their constituents to voice their disgust that the LIRR would increase fares while they continue to suffer from delays and cancelled trains.”</p> <p>At 11 a.m. Monday, the state Senate Standing Committee on Civil Service and Pensions will hold a public hearing “to investigate the use of 9/11 line of duty sick leave, to determine whether the program is working and to discuss any changes that need to be made to the program.” The hearing will take place at 250 Broadway in Manhattan.</p> <p>At noon Monday, the New York City Economic Development Corporation will host the “Development Finance Conference 2018” at Convene in Midtown. Former U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx will deliver keynote remarks. Other speakers will include EDC President James Patchett, City Planning Commission Chair Marisa Lago, Citigroup vice-chairman Raymond McGuire, and Industry City CEO Andrew Kimball.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Monday, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will be honored at Vocal-NY’s annual gala at Roulette in Boerum Hill. Also being honored will be Emcon Pharmacy in Park Slope, and Vocal-NY leader Asia Betancourt.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Monday, the 2019 Charter Revision Commission will meet in Brooklyn at Medgar Evers College to hear public testimony.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Monday, the governor’s Regulated Marijuana Workgroup <a href="http://events.eventzilla.net/e/bronx--regulated-marijuana-listening-session-2138947696" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will hold</a> a listening session at the South Bronx Community Charter High School in Morrisania on the legalization of marijuana in New York.</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Monday, NYCT President Andy Byford and City Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg will hold a town hall meeting at Middle Collegiate Church in the East Village, discussing the upcoming shutdown of the L train. City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will deliver remarks.</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Monday, City &amp; State <a href="https://www.cityandstateny.com/events/westchester-power-50" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> its “Westchester Power 50” reception at the Radisson Hotel in New Rochelle. County Executive George Latimer will give keynote remarks.</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Monday, the Museum of the City of New York <a href="https://www.mcny.org/event/fdr-al-smith-and-golden-age-ny-politics" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> historians Terry Golway and Peter Quinn for a discussion on the rocky relationship between Al Smith and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, two of New York’s most famous governors.</p> <p>At 7 p.m. Monday, City Comptroller Scott Stringer will hold a public hearing on the city’s lead crisis at the Frederick Samuel Community Center in Harlem. He will be joined by U.S. Rep Adriano Espaillat, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, State Senator Brian Benjamin, Assemblymembers Inez Dickens, Robert Rodriguez, Al Taylor, and Carmen de la Rosa, and Council Members Bill Perkins, Ydanis Rodriguez, Diana Ayala, and Mark Levine.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday</strong><br />Yom Kippur will begin on Tuesday evening and end on Wednesday evening.</p> <p>At 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, the Association for a Better New York <a href="http://abny.org/meetinginfo.php?id=92&amp;ts=1536344349" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> U.S. Reps Hakeem Jeffries, Carolyn Maloney, and Grace Meng for a discussion on the midterm elections at the Roosevelt Hotel. MSNBC’s Steve Kornacki will moderate.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday<br /></strong>There are no Wednesday events on our radar as of Sunday evening.</p> <p><strong>Thursday</strong><br />At the City Council on Thursday:<br />--The Committee on Juvenile Justice will meet at 10 a.m. for an oversight hearing regarding an “update on New York City’s implementation of raising the age of criminal responsibility.”<br />--The Committee on Women will meet at 10 a.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “abortion and reproductive rights,” as well as to discuss a resolution calling for the legislature to pass, and the governor to sign, the Reproductive Health Act.<br />--The Committee on Sanitation and Solid Waste Management will meet at 10 a.m. for an oversight hearing regarding an “update on the City’s organics collection program.”<br />--The Committee on Land Use will meet at 11 a.m.<br />--The Committees on Education and Public Safety will meet jointly at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “school emergency preparedness and safety,” as well as to discuss several related laws.<br />--The Committee on Small Business will meet at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding business improvement districts.<br />--The Committees on General Welfare and Mental Health will meet jointly at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “shelter accommodations and services for those with disabilities.”</p> <p>At 8 a.m. Thursday, U.S. Reps Hakeem Jeffries and Jerrold Nadler <a href="http://www.crainsnewyork.com/events-calendar/details/4/3518031#utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=cnyb-events&amp;utm_campaign=cnyb-events-20180809" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will join Crain’s New York Business</a> for a “Business Breakfast Forum” at the New York Athletic Club, discussing “how New York is faring under Trump, their take on the midterm election and their agendas in Washington.”</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Thursday, the 2019 Charter Revision Commission will meet at Queens Borough Hall to hear public testimony.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Thursday, the governor’s Regulated Marijuana Workgroup <a href="http://events.eventzilla.net/e/manhattan--regulated-marijuana-listening-session-2138947698" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will hold</a> a listening session at the Borough of Manhattan Community College on the legalization of marijuana in New York.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Thursday, there will be a public scoping meeting at PS 133 in Gowanus to discuss the mayor’s plan to place a new jail in Brooklyn, as part of the replacement plan for Rikers Island.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Thursday, the Panel for Educational Policy will hold a public meeting at the High School for Fashion Industries in Chelsea.</p> <p><strong>Friday and the weekend</strong><br />Mayor de Blasio may make his weekly appearance on WNYC's The Brian Lehrer Show on Friday at 10 a.m.</p> <p>Starting at 10 a.m. Saturday, the New York Civil Liberties Union <a href="https://www.nyclu.org/en/events/museum-broken-windows" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> “The Museum of Broken Windows,” a “pop-up” museum dedicated to documenting the history of broken-windows policing in New York City. The pop-up will stand at 9 West 8th St in Greenwich Village until September 30.</p> <p>***<br />Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Brachfeld and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@GothamGazette</a></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" alt="New York City Hall" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>This week will start with a lot of focus on continuing the primary election analysis and pivoting to the general election matchups for statewide and legislative seats. Some of the focus will surely be on how <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7931-2018-new-york-state-primary-election-results" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the winners</a> pulled their victories off and why the losers lost, but also whether and how those who lost Democratic primaries but have other ballot lines for November will vacate those lines. Chief among them are Cynthia Nixon and Jumaane Williams on the Working Families Party line, but also Jeff Klein and other former members of the Independent Democratic Conference who lost their Democratic primaries but have ballot lines from small parties like the Independence Party or Women’s Equality Party.</p> <p>As the general election quickly swings into gear -- as of Sunday there were just 50 days until Election Day, November 6! -- the race for governor turns into a contest among Governor Andrew Cuomo, Republican nominee Marc Molinaro, Howie Hawkins of the Green Party, Libertarian Party nominee Larry Sharpe, and Stephanie Minor, running on her newly created Serve America Movement line. Nixon may also be on the ballot, but she is very likely not to campaign if she is. Or, she might be moved off the WFP line, possibly replaced by Cuomo if the warring factions can agree that they will work together to avoid creating a better path to victory for Molinaro or another candidate.</p> <p>The governor and lieutenant governor nominees of the different parties now run as a ticket, so after Kathy Hochul survived her challenge from Jumaane Williams, she can now work with Cuomo to win in November. There were no statewide primaries beyond three in the Democratic Party, with the lone exception of a Reform Party primary for its Attorney General nominee, which will be Nancy Sliwa.</p> <p>The Attorney General race is now among Democratic nominee Letitia James, Republican Keith Wofford, Green candidate Michael Sussman, and Sliwa of the Reform Party. The Comptroller race features incumbent Democrat Tom DiNapoli, who did not face a primary challenge, as well as Republican nominee Jonathan Trichter, and Green nominee Mark Dunlea.</p> <p>Control of the state Senate will be on the ballot this November, with races in New York City and elsewhere determining which party has the majority come next year. And, competitive New York races for the House of Representatives will help determine which party controls that chamber come January. There is also the race between New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and her Republican challenger Chele Farley, as well as various state Assembly race, though that house of the Legislature is overwhelmingly Democratic and will remain so regardless of how a few competitive races may go.</p> <p>There’s also government happening this week, as well as other interesting events not directly related to this year’s elections. For example, the 2019 Charter Revision Commission held <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7932-2019-charter-revision-commission-holds-first-public-hearing" target="_blank" rel="noopener">its first public hearing</a> this past week and has two more this week, and the City Council has a variety of hearings this week.&nbsp;See our day-by-day rundown below.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>e-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>Monday<br /></strong>On Monday morning, Mayor de Blasio will speak at&nbsp;at the Fifth Annual Brooklyn Dems Post Primary Breakfast Reception at Junior's. In the evening, the Mayor will appear on NY1’s Inside City Hall in the 7 and 11 p.m. hours.</p> <p>At the City Council on Monday:<br />--The Subcommittee on Zoning and Franchises will meet at 9:30 a.m.<br />--The Committee on Technology will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss proposed laws relating to agency data, including the “digitization of historic data,” as well as laws relating to protections for cable subscribers.<br />--The Committees on Immigration and Youth Services will meet jointly at 10 a.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “LGBTQ immigrant youth in New York City,” as well as a proposed law requiring the city to “create a plan of action to protect children who qualify for special immigrant juvenile status.”<br />--The Committee on For-Hire Vehicles will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss several proposed laws relating to, among other things, benefits for FHV and taxi drivers, “addressing the problem of medallion owner debt,” financial education for drivers, creating an “Office of Inclusion” in the Taxi and Limousine Commission, and “deductions from certain for-hire driver earnings.” City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will deliver opening remarks.<br />--The Subcommittee on Landmarks, Public Siting, and Maritime Uses will meet at noon.<br />--The Committee on Parks and Recreation will meet at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “the state of the City’s jointly operated playgrounds.”<br />--The Committee on Fire and Emergency Management will meet at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “EMS respond to the opioid epidemic,” as well as to discuss a proposed law relating to “creating online applications for fire alarm plan examinations.”<br />--The Committees on Aging and Civil &amp; Human Rights will meet jointly at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “age discrimination in the workplace.”<br />--The Subcommittee on Planning, Dispositions, and Concessions will meet at 2 p.m.</p> <p>The New York State Board of Regents will meet on Monday and Tuesday.</p> <p>On Monday morning, Comptroller Tom DiNapoli will release his annual report on Wall Street performance and compensation.</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Monday in City Hall Park, “Two New York City unions representing more than 4,700 Emergency Medical Service professionals will stand in the shadow of City Hall...to demand that Mayor Bill de Blasio support unlimited sick leave for EMS responders who suffered health ailments as a result of serving at Ground Zero after the 9/11 attacks. Local 2507, which represents 4,200 Uniformed Emergency Medical Technicians, Paramedics, and Fire Inspectors, and Local 3621, which represents 505 Uniformed EMS Officers, including Captains and Lieutenants, then will testify at a hearing at 250 Broadway about the need for State legislation that will grant affected EMS workers unlimited sick time due to their work in the recovery operation after 9/11.”</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Monday,&nbsp;Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul will deliver remarks at a Vital Brooklyn playground opening, at The Winthrop Campus School. At 2 p.m., Hochul will announce the recipients of the New York State Police Officer of the Year Award at Yonkers City Hall.</p> <p>At 11 a.m. Monday at City Hall, “First Lady Chirlane McCray, Chair of the Mayor’s Fund, Commissioner of Immigrant Affairs Bitta Mostofi and Commissioner of the Department of Social Services Steven Banks will be joined by the City employees who have returned from volunteering to provide pro bono assistance to immigrant children and families in detention in Dilley, Texas. The delegation, which was made possible by funding from the Mayor’s Fund, includes lawyers and licensed clinical social workers. This event is open press. There will be Q-and-A.”</p> <p>At 11 a.m. Monday on Long Island, “Senate Majority Leader John Flanagan...will be joined by the Senate Majority’s Long Island Delegation at a press conference...at the Bethpage Train Station to call for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) to put any proposed 2019 fare hike on hold until it makes measurable improvements in service, equipment failures and delays. The press conference will introduce legislation sponsored by Senator Elaine Phillips...and Assemblyman Dean Murray...to protect commuters from facing even more disruptions due to the LIRR’s loss of any revenue. The delegation, led by Senator Phillips, has also established a petition drive that enables their constituents to voice their disgust that the LIRR would increase fares while they continue to suffer from delays and cancelled trains.”</p> <p>At 11 a.m. Monday, the state Senate Standing Committee on Civil Service and Pensions will hold a public hearing “to investigate the use of 9/11 line of duty sick leave, to determine whether the program is working and to discuss any changes that need to be made to the program.” The hearing will take place at 250 Broadway in Manhattan.</p> <p>At noon Monday, the New York City Economic Development Corporation will host the “Development Finance Conference 2018” at Convene in Midtown. Former U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx will deliver keynote remarks. Other speakers will include EDC President James Patchett, City Planning Commission Chair Marisa Lago, Citigroup vice-chairman Raymond McGuire, and Industry City CEO Andrew Kimball.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Monday, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will be honored at Vocal-NY’s annual gala at Roulette in Boerum Hill. Also being honored will be Emcon Pharmacy in Park Slope, and Vocal-NY leader Asia Betancourt.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Monday, the 2019 Charter Revision Commission will meet in Brooklyn at Medgar Evers College to hear public testimony.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Monday, the governor’s Regulated Marijuana Workgroup <a href="http://events.eventzilla.net/e/bronx--regulated-marijuana-listening-session-2138947696" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will hold</a> a listening session at the South Bronx Community Charter High School in Morrisania on the legalization of marijuana in New York.</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Monday, NYCT President Andy Byford and City Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg will hold a town hall meeting at Middle Collegiate Church in the East Village, discussing the upcoming shutdown of the L train. City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will deliver remarks.</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Monday, City &amp; State <a href="https://www.cityandstateny.com/events/westchester-power-50" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> its “Westchester Power 50” reception at the Radisson Hotel in New Rochelle. County Executive George Latimer will give keynote remarks.</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Monday, the Museum of the City of New York <a href="https://www.mcny.org/event/fdr-al-smith-and-golden-age-ny-politics" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> historians Terry Golway and Peter Quinn for a discussion on the rocky relationship between Al Smith and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, two of New York’s most famous governors.</p> <p>At 7 p.m. Monday, City Comptroller Scott Stringer will hold a public hearing on the city’s lead crisis at the Frederick Samuel Community Center in Harlem. He will be joined by U.S. Rep Adriano Espaillat, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, State Senator Brian Benjamin, Assemblymembers Inez Dickens, Robert Rodriguez, Al Taylor, and Carmen de la Rosa, and Council Members Bill Perkins, Ydanis Rodriguez, Diana Ayala, and Mark Levine.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday</strong><br />Yom Kippur will begin on Tuesday evening and end on Wednesday evening.</p> <p>At 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, the Association for a Better New York <a href="http://abny.org/meetinginfo.php?id=92&amp;ts=1536344349" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> U.S. Reps Hakeem Jeffries, Carolyn Maloney, and Grace Meng for a discussion on the midterm elections at the Roosevelt Hotel. MSNBC’s Steve Kornacki will moderate.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday<br /></strong>There are no Wednesday events on our radar as of Sunday evening.</p> <p><strong>Thursday</strong><br />At the City Council on Thursday:<br />--The Committee on Juvenile Justice will meet at 10 a.m. for an oversight hearing regarding an “update on New York City’s implementation of raising the age of criminal responsibility.”<br />--The Committee on Women will meet at 10 a.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “abortion and reproductive rights,” as well as to discuss a resolution calling for the legislature to pass, and the governor to sign, the Reproductive Health Act.<br />--The Committee on Sanitation and Solid Waste Management will meet at 10 a.m. for an oversight hearing regarding an “update on the City’s organics collection program.”<br />--The Committee on Land Use will meet at 11 a.m.<br />--The Committees on Education and Public Safety will meet jointly at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “school emergency preparedness and safety,” as well as to discuss several related laws.<br />--The Committee on Small Business will meet at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding business improvement districts.<br />--The Committees on General Welfare and Mental Health will meet jointly at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “shelter accommodations and services for those with disabilities.”</p> <p>At 8 a.m. Thursday, U.S. Reps Hakeem Jeffries and Jerrold Nadler <a href="http://www.crainsnewyork.com/events-calendar/details/4/3518031#utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=cnyb-events&amp;utm_campaign=cnyb-events-20180809" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will join Crain’s New York Business</a> for a “Business Breakfast Forum” at the New York Athletic Club, discussing “how New York is faring under Trump, their take on the midterm election and their agendas in Washington.”</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Thursday, the 2019 Charter Revision Commission will meet at Queens Borough Hall to hear public testimony.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Thursday, the governor’s Regulated Marijuana Workgroup <a href="http://events.eventzilla.net/e/manhattan--regulated-marijuana-listening-session-2138947698" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will hold</a> a listening session at the Borough of Manhattan Community College on the legalization of marijuana in New York.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Thursday, there will be a public scoping meeting at PS 133 in Gowanus to discuss the mayor’s plan to place a new jail in Brooklyn, as part of the replacement plan for Rikers Island.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Thursday, the Panel for Educational Policy will hold a public meeting at the High School for Fashion Industries in Chelsea.</p> <p><strong>Friday and the weekend</strong><br />Mayor de Blasio may make his weekly appearance on WNYC's The Brian Lehrer Show on Friday at 10 a.m.</p> <p>Starting at 10 a.m. Saturday, the New York Civil Liberties Union <a href="https://www.nyclu.org/en/events/museum-broken-windows" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> “The Museum of Broken Windows,” a “pop-up” museum dedicated to documenting the history of broken-windows policing in New York City. The pop-up will stand at 9 West 8th St in Greenwich Village until September 30.</p> <p>***<br />Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Brachfeld and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@GothamGazette</a></p> The Week Ahead in New York Politics, September 10 2018-09-09T04:00:00+00:00 2018-09-09T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7922:the-week-ahead-in-new-york-politics-september-10 Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" alt="New York City Hall" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>Thursday is primary day! After a few more days of intense campaigning, by the end of the night on Thursday, we should know the victors in the primaries -- almost all of them in the Democratic Party -- for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, many state legislative seats, and more.</p> <p>The most closely watched races are the statewide primaries between Governor Andrew Cuomo and Cynthia Nixon and between Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul and City Council Member Jumaane Williams; the Attorney General primary among Public Advocate Letitia James, Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, Professor Zephyr Teachout, and Leecia Eve, a Verizon lobbyist and former aide to several major Democratic officials, including Cuomo. Also, about a dozen Democratic state Senate primaries, including the eight involving former members of the Independent Democratic Conference, six of which include districts covering parts of New York City.</p> <p>The week starts after an eventful weekend of campaigning and controversy. While candidates and their supporters were rallying and canvassing and announcing endorsements and tweeting and texting and more, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced he will not make endorsements in either of the primaries for Governor and Lieutenant Governor. A de Blasio spokesperson told Gotham Gazette the mayor has not decided yet whether he will endorse in the Attorney General primary; wherein his wife, Chirlane McCray is backing Teachout, though both de Blasio and McCray have a long relationship with James.</p> <p>More controversial than de Blasio’s announcement, though, was news of a mailing made by the State Democratic Party targeting Nixon as anti-Semitic, which Cuomo and the state party’s executive director, Andrew Berman, both denounced after it became public on Saturday. A Cuomo spokesperson said the governor knew nothing about it and Berman said likewise about himself, and that he was going to hold the responsible parties to account. Both declarations appeared confusing to those familiar with how the state party and election season mailers work, including that Cuomo has moved millions of dollars from his campaign account to the state party’s, and is the de facto leader of the party apparatus.</p> <p>Also this weekend, the Cuomo administration had to explain the fact that the governor had held a celebratory ribbon-cutting for a new span of the Mario M. Cuomo Bridge (which replaces the Tappan Zee), including Hillary Clinton, only to have the portion of the bridge not opened due to safety precautions emanating from the old bridge, which is being demolished. Cuomo held the celebration on Friday, just six days before the primary, and questions arose as to whether he had rushed the event to take advantage of good pre-primary press.</p> <p>While the focus of the week will largely be the primaries, the week starts with the Rosh Hashanah holiday and the anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks.</p> <p>There are several governmental and other events to be aware of this week -- see the day-by-day rundown below.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>e-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>Monday</strong><br />Monday is Rosh Hashanah. There will be campaigning, but no public government events.</p> <p>At 10:30 a.m. Monday, Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max and City Limits editor Jarrett Murphy will appear on The Brian Lehrer Show on WNYC radio, at 93.9FM or wnyc.org.</p> <p>Mayor Bill de Blasio will be on the campaign trail for one of the three state Senate candidates he has endorsed, Jessica Ramos, in Queens, and he will make his usual weekly appearance on NY1's Inside City Hall in the 7 and 11 p.m. hours.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday</strong><br />Tuesday is the 17th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. There will be remembrances across the city. One of this will be at 6:30 p.m., when Staten Island Borough President James Oddo will preside over an annual memorial ceremony for victims of the 9/11 attacks at the Postcards memorial.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday</strong><br />The City Council will hold a stated meeting at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. It will be preceded by a press conference hosted by Speaker Corey Johnson.</p> <p>Also at the City Council on Wednesday: the Committee on Transportation will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss proposed laws laws related to the L train shutdown, including “designating community information centers in the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn” for the duration of the shutdown, “establishing an ombudsperson within the department of transportation,” and to discuss a resolution “calling upon the Governor and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to commit to an expeditious transition to an electric bus fleet and to use electric buses as a robust part of its replacement service during the upcoming L train shutdown.”</p> <p>At 8 a.m. Wednesday, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) and Baruch College will host their annual Small Business Assistance Forum at Baruch College’s William and Anita Newman Conference Center. The event will include a discussion on issues important to small businesses in New York City featuring Rachel Van Tosh, Deputy Commissioner for Business Services at the New York City Department of Small Business Services, and Carlina Rivera, City Council Member for the 2nd Council District, which includes a portion of Flatiron. That conversation will be moderated by Gotham Gazette Executive Editor Ben Max.</p> <p>At 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, the Joint Commission on Public Ethics will hold a commission meeting at 540 Broadway in Albany.</p> <p>At 5 p.m. Wednesday, the latest episode of Max &amp; Murphy will be on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org. The show will be a preview of Thursday’s primary elections.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Wednesday, the City Council’s Charter Revision Commission will hold its first public hearing, at Lehman College’s Lovinger Theatre. The hearing kicks off a series of events across the five boroughs over the next few weeks.</p> <p><strong>Thursday</strong><br />Thursday is primary day in New York for state races, including Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, State Legislature, Judgeships, and other races. Polls in New York City and the counties of Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester, Rockland, Orange, Putnam, Dutchess, and Erie will open at 6 a.m., and polls in all other locations statewide will open at noon. All polls statewide will close at 9 p.m. Check your <a href="https://voterlookup.elections.ny.gov/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">registration status</a>; <a href="http://whosontheballot.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">preview your ballot</a>; and <a href="http://vote.nyc.ny.us/html/home/locator_updates.shtml" target="_blank" rel="noopener">check your polling place</a>.</p> <p><strong>Friday and the weekend</strong><br />At 8 a.m. Friday, the Association for a Better New York will host Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza for a “Power Breakfast” at the Roosevelt Hotel in Midtown. Carranza will “present his vision and priorities for the New York City Department of Education and New York City public schools.”</p> <p>At 8:30 a.m. Friday, the Murphy Institute of Labor will host “Is a Democratic Capitalism Possible?” discussing the erosion of democracy as a result of wealth concentration, and steps to “bolster our democracy and create a more equitable society.” Speakers will include Deputy Mayor J. Phillip Thompson; Maurice Weeks, Co-Executive Director of the Action Center on Race &amp; The Economy; and NYU professor Kim Phillips Fein. CUNY professor Frances Fox Piven will moderate.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Friday, the New York City Board of Correction will hold a public meeting at 125 Worth Street.</p> <p>Mayor de Blasio may make his weekly appearance on WNYC's The Brian Lehrer Show on Friday at 10 a.m.</p> <p>***</p> <p>Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Brachfeld and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@GothamGazette</a></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" alt="New York City Hall" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>Thursday is primary day! After a few more days of intense campaigning, by the end of the night on Thursday, we should know the victors in the primaries -- almost all of them in the Democratic Party -- for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, many state legislative seats, and more.</p> <p>The most closely watched races are the statewide primaries between Governor Andrew Cuomo and Cynthia Nixon and between Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul and City Council Member Jumaane Williams; the Attorney General primary among Public Advocate Letitia James, Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, Professor Zephyr Teachout, and Leecia Eve, a Verizon lobbyist and former aide to several major Democratic officials, including Cuomo. Also, about a dozen Democratic state Senate primaries, including the eight involving former members of the Independent Democratic Conference, six of which include districts covering parts of New York City.</p> <p>The week starts after an eventful weekend of campaigning and controversy. While candidates and their supporters were rallying and canvassing and announcing endorsements and tweeting and texting and more, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced he will not make endorsements in either of the primaries for Governor and Lieutenant Governor. A de Blasio spokesperson told Gotham Gazette the mayor has not decided yet whether he will endorse in the Attorney General primary; wherein his wife, Chirlane McCray is backing Teachout, though both de Blasio and McCray have a long relationship with James.</p> <p>More controversial than de Blasio’s announcement, though, was news of a mailing made by the State Democratic Party targeting Nixon as anti-Semitic, which Cuomo and the state party’s executive director, Andrew Berman, both denounced after it became public on Saturday. A Cuomo spokesperson said the governor knew nothing about it and Berman said likewise about himself, and that he was going to hold the responsible parties to account. Both declarations appeared confusing to those familiar with how the state party and election season mailers work, including that Cuomo has moved millions of dollars from his campaign account to the state party’s, and is the de facto leader of the party apparatus.</p> <p>Also this weekend, the Cuomo administration had to explain the fact that the governor had held a celebratory ribbon-cutting for a new span of the Mario M. Cuomo Bridge (which replaces the Tappan Zee), including Hillary Clinton, only to have the portion of the bridge not opened due to safety precautions emanating from the old bridge, which is being demolished. Cuomo held the celebration on Friday, just six days before the primary, and questions arose as to whether he had rushed the event to take advantage of good pre-primary press.</p> <p>While the focus of the week will largely be the primaries, the week starts with the Rosh Hashanah holiday and the anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks.</p> <p>There are several governmental and other events to be aware of this week -- see the day-by-day rundown below.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>e-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>Monday</strong><br />Monday is Rosh Hashanah. There will be campaigning, but no public government events.</p> <p>At 10:30 a.m. Monday, Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max and City Limits editor Jarrett Murphy will appear on The Brian Lehrer Show on WNYC radio, at 93.9FM or wnyc.org.</p> <p>Mayor Bill de Blasio will be on the campaign trail for one of the three state Senate candidates he has endorsed, Jessica Ramos, in Queens, and he will make his usual weekly appearance on NY1's Inside City Hall in the 7 and 11 p.m. hours.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday</strong><br />Tuesday is the 17th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. There will be remembrances across the city. One of this will be at 6:30 p.m., when Staten Island Borough President James Oddo will preside over an annual memorial ceremony for victims of the 9/11 attacks at the Postcards memorial.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday</strong><br />The City Council will hold a stated meeting at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. It will be preceded by a press conference hosted by Speaker Corey Johnson.</p> <p>Also at the City Council on Wednesday: the Committee on Transportation will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss proposed laws laws related to the L train shutdown, including “designating community information centers in the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn” for the duration of the shutdown, “establishing an ombudsperson within the department of transportation,” and to discuss a resolution “calling upon the Governor and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to commit to an expeditious transition to an electric bus fleet and to use electric buses as a robust part of its replacement service during the upcoming L train shutdown.”</p> <p>At 8 a.m. Wednesday, the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) and Baruch College will host their annual Small Business Assistance Forum at Baruch College’s William and Anita Newman Conference Center. The event will include a discussion on issues important to small businesses in New York City featuring Rachel Van Tosh, Deputy Commissioner for Business Services at the New York City Department of Small Business Services, and Carlina Rivera, City Council Member for the 2nd Council District, which includes a portion of Flatiron. That conversation will be moderated by Gotham Gazette Executive Editor Ben Max.</p> <p>At 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, the Joint Commission on Public Ethics will hold a commission meeting at 540 Broadway in Albany.</p> <p>At 5 p.m. Wednesday, the latest episode of Max &amp; Murphy will be on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org. The show will be a preview of Thursday’s primary elections.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Wednesday, the City Council’s Charter Revision Commission will hold its first public hearing, at Lehman College’s Lovinger Theatre. The hearing kicks off a series of events across the five boroughs over the next few weeks.</p> <p><strong>Thursday</strong><br />Thursday is primary day in New York for state races, including Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, State Legislature, Judgeships, and other races. Polls in New York City and the counties of Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester, Rockland, Orange, Putnam, Dutchess, and Erie will open at 6 a.m., and polls in all other locations statewide will open at noon. All polls statewide will close at 9 p.m. Check your <a href="https://voterlookup.elections.ny.gov/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">registration status</a>; <a href="http://whosontheballot.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">preview your ballot</a>; and <a href="http://vote.nyc.ny.us/html/home/locator_updates.shtml" target="_blank" rel="noopener">check your polling place</a>.</p> <p><strong>Friday and the weekend</strong><br />At 8 a.m. Friday, the Association for a Better New York will host Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza for a “Power Breakfast” at the Roosevelt Hotel in Midtown. Carranza will “present his vision and priorities for the New York City Department of Education and New York City public schools.”</p> <p>At 8:30 a.m. Friday, the Murphy Institute of Labor will host “Is a Democratic Capitalism Possible?” discussing the erosion of democracy as a result of wealth concentration, and steps to “bolster our democracy and create a more equitable society.” Speakers will include Deputy Mayor J. Phillip Thompson; Maurice Weeks, Co-Executive Director of the Action Center on Race &amp; The Economy; and NYU professor Kim Phillips Fein. CUNY professor Frances Fox Piven will moderate.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Friday, the New York City Board of Correction will hold a public meeting at 125 Worth Street.</p> <p>Mayor de Blasio may make his weekly appearance on WNYC's The Brian Lehrer Show on Friday at 10 a.m.</p> <p>***</p> <p>Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Brachfeld and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@GothamGazette</a></p> Vacancy in the Public Advocate's Office? Call the City Council Speaker 2018-09-06T04:00:00+00:00 2018-09-06T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7918:vacancy-in-the-public-advocate-s-office-call-the-city-council-speaker Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/tish-james-co-jo-cityhall.jpg" alt="tish james co jo cityhall" width="600" /></p> <p>Letitia James and Corey Johnson (photo: Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p>Two former speakers of the New York City Council -- Melissa Mark-Viverito and Christine Quinn -- are on the list of possible contenders for a potential vacancy in the office of public advocate should the current occupant, Letitia James, win the post of attorney general in this fall’s elections. But it’s the sitting Council speaker, Corey Johnson, who will get to do the job first if that scenario came to pass.</p> <p>James is competing against three other Democrats to win the party’s primary nomination for attorney general on September 13. She has been the presumed frontrunner for months, with the blessing of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the state Democratic Party, though one of her opponents, Fordham Law professor Zephyr Teachout, has picked up strong momentum and several prominent endorsement in recent weeks.</p> <p>If James prevails in the primary then the general, assuming she is sworn in an attorney general at the start of 2019, it would trigger a nonpartisan special election to be held roughly 51 days later. And for those seven weeks or so, the City Council speaker would assume her duties.</p> <p>Under Section 44 of the City Charter, in the event of a vacancy in the public advocate’s office, “the speaker shall act as public advocate pending the filling of the vacancy pursuant to subdivision c of section twenty-four, and shall be a member of every board of which the public advocate is a member by virtue of his or her office.”</p> <p>It would be the first time since the creation of the office of public advocate and the current office of the speaker, through a charter revision in 1989, that the clause would go into effect. It’s unclear how the speaker would approach the dual role, even in the interim, as he would both lead his 51-member legislative body and large central staff, and, as the title suggests, an office that advocates for the interests of everyday New Yorkers and keeps a watch on the functions and failures of city government. Both Johnson’s and James’ offices declined to comment for this article. Johnson has endorsed James for attorney general.</p> <p>“If you get a vacancy, you want to get it filled by someone. Elections are gonna take a long time. A short time but a long time,” said Eric Lane, the Eric J. Schmertz Distinguished Professor of Public Law and Public Service at the Maurice A. Deane School of Law, Hofstra University. Lane served as executive director and counsel to the 1989 charter revision commission, which overhauled the structure of city government and created the positions that James and Johnson now hold.</p> <p>“We definitely didn’t want the mayor to make that appointment,” Lane said, explaining the thinking behind the line of succession for public advocate. “In an intensely administrative government, where the mayor holds so much power, it’s the public advocate’s function to be a watchdog on that power.” The public advocate is also next in line to the mayoralty if a sitting mayor is removed from office or unable to carry out his or her duties.&nbsp;</p> <p>The public advocate was formerly known as the City Council president, but the position’s powers were stripped by the 1989 commission through the creation of the City Council speaker. The commission then decided to retain and re-envision the public advocate’s office in its current form, Lane said. “It was, in some ways, the least significant, most controversial topic we considered in the 1989 commission,” he said, noting that there was hotly-contested debate over the necessity of another citywide office. The rationale behind it was two-fold, he insisted. To have another set of independent eyes on the city bureaucracy and to allow minority communities to have a more participatory role in city politics.</p> <p>Given the public advocate’s connection with the City Council, it then made sense for the vacancy to fall to the speaker. “We could’ve appointed the comptroller,” Lane conceded, “but at the time, we thought it would be more consistent with what the Council does. The Council had a relationship with that office, historically.”</p> <p>[Read: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7910-potentially-crowded-public-advocate-special-election-could-feature-two-former-council-speakers" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Potentially Crowded Public Advocate Special Election Could Feature Two Former Council Speakers</a>]</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, City government reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/tish-james-co-jo-cityhall.jpg" alt="tish james co jo cityhall" width="600" /></p> <p>Letitia James and Corey Johnson (photo: Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p>Two former speakers of the New York City Council -- Melissa Mark-Viverito and Christine Quinn -- are on the list of possible contenders for a potential vacancy in the office of public advocate should the current occupant, Letitia James, win the post of attorney general in this fall’s elections. But it’s the sitting Council speaker, Corey Johnson, who will get to do the job first if that scenario came to pass.</p> <p>James is competing against three other Democrats to win the party’s primary nomination for attorney general on September 13. She has been the presumed frontrunner for months, with the blessing of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the state Democratic Party, though one of her opponents, Fordham Law professor Zephyr Teachout, has picked up strong momentum and several prominent endorsement in recent weeks.</p> <p>If James prevails in the primary then the general, assuming she is sworn in an attorney general at the start of 2019, it would trigger a nonpartisan special election to be held roughly 51 days later. And for those seven weeks or so, the City Council speaker would assume her duties.</p> <p>Under Section 44 of the City Charter, in the event of a vacancy in the public advocate’s office, “the speaker shall act as public advocate pending the filling of the vacancy pursuant to subdivision c of section twenty-four, and shall be a member of every board of which the public advocate is a member by virtue of his or her office.”</p> <p>It would be the first time since the creation of the office of public advocate and the current office of the speaker, through a charter revision in 1989, that the clause would go into effect. It’s unclear how the speaker would approach the dual role, even in the interim, as he would both lead his 51-member legislative body and large central staff, and, as the title suggests, an office that advocates for the interests of everyday New Yorkers and keeps a watch on the functions and failures of city government. Both Johnson’s and James’ offices declined to comment for this article. Johnson has endorsed James for attorney general.</p> <p>“If you get a vacancy, you want to get it filled by someone. Elections are gonna take a long time. A short time but a long time,” said Eric Lane, the Eric J. Schmertz Distinguished Professor of Public Law and Public Service at the Maurice A. Deane School of Law, Hofstra University. Lane served as executive director and counsel to the 1989 charter revision commission, which overhauled the structure of city government and created the positions that James and Johnson now hold.</p> <p>“We definitely didn’t want the mayor to make that appointment,” Lane said, explaining the thinking behind the line of succession for public advocate. “In an intensely administrative government, where the mayor holds so much power, it’s the public advocate’s function to be a watchdog on that power.” The public advocate is also next in line to the mayoralty if a sitting mayor is removed from office or unable to carry out his or her duties.&nbsp;</p> <p>The public advocate was formerly known as the City Council president, but the position’s powers were stripped by the 1989 commission through the creation of the City Council speaker. The commission then decided to retain and re-envision the public advocate’s office in its current form, Lane said. “It was, in some ways, the least significant, most controversial topic we considered in the 1989 commission,” he said, noting that there was hotly-contested debate over the necessity of another citywide office. The rationale behind it was two-fold, he insisted. To have another set of independent eyes on the city bureaucracy and to allow minority communities to have a more participatory role in city politics.</p> <p>Given the public advocate’s connection with the City Council, it then made sense for the vacancy to fall to the speaker. “We could’ve appointed the comptroller,” Lane conceded, “but at the time, we thought it would be more consistent with what the Council does. The Council had a relationship with that office, historically.”</p> <p>[Read: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7910-potentially-crowded-public-advocate-special-election-could-feature-two-former-council-speakers" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Potentially Crowded Public Advocate Special Election Could Feature Two Former Council Speakers</a>]</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, City government reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Providing Stronger Support for Breastfeeding Mothers in New York City 2018-08-19T04:00:00+00:00 2018-08-19T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7874:providing-stronger-support-for-breastfeeding-mothers-in-new-york-city Samar Khurshid <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/dc8tpaouwaal45h.jpg" alt="dc8tpaouwaal45h" width="600" height="352" /></p> <p>Council Member Laurie Cumbo, the author (right), with her son, Prince (photo:@cmlauriecumbo)</p> <hr /> <p>If we are truly committed to the health, well-being, and economic advancement of mothers and babies, we must examine our public spaces, work places, and cultural biases when it comes to supporting and accommodating a mother’s choice to breastfeed. As of only a few weeks ago, mothers can now breastfeed <a href="https://people.com/health/breastfeeding-public-legal-all-50-states" target="_blank" rel="noopener">legally</a> in all 50 states without fear of violating laws pertaining to indecent exposure or public obscenity. This is a low bar for celebration, and cause for a critical examination of our own local laws and societal norms.</p> <p>The benefits of breastfeeding are long-known and widely accepted in the medical community – the World Health Organization recommends that babies are breastfed for at least the first six months of their lives. The health benefits for babies include lower rates of obesity, SIDS, asthma, and other conditions, and can even be traced to higher IQs. For mothers, breastfeeding lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes, and certain types of ovarian and breast cancers. It is for these reasons, and for the purpose of defending a mother’s right to choose what they do with their bodies and how they take care of their children, that we must remain diligent in our efforts to identify and break down any barriers for mothers who choose to breastfeed.</p> <p>Those of us holding elected office must all leverage our positions and platforms to advance breastfeeding rights and awareness. We must make sure that mothers know all the facts about breastfeeding, what they are entitled to and what resources are available to them, should they choose to breastfeed.</p> <p>Here, in New York, we have strong laws and we are increasing our investment at the state and local level in support of breastfeeding mothers. I am proud to have made breastfeeding rights a focal point of my time in office, with legislation advancing greater education and access for those who need to breastfeed or express milk in public or in the workplace. Right now, the Mother’s Day Legislative Package, which I was proud to spearhead on my very own first Mother’s Day, has pending legislation that will expand accommodations for breastfeeding mothers in certain city spaces and in workplaces, as well as establish a standard lactation accommodation policy. I thank my colleagues, Council Members Robert Cornegy and Carlina Rivera, for their leadership and partnership on these breastfeeding bills. I am committed to seeing through these efforts and ensuring that our physical structures reflect our values of equity and inclusion.</p> <p>As a mother of a now one-year-old myself, I have a new appreciation for and understanding of the literal and figurative structures that play a role in the lives of New York mothers. From pre-natal care to childbirth and child rearing, there is a culture of expectation that women are just supposed to know how to take care of themselves and their children based on instinct alone. Far too many women are not getting the resources they need. Further, as recent research has shown, health concerns expressed during childbirth are often not taken seriously, resulting in a much higher mortality rates for black and Latina women. The truth is, we all need guidance and support throughout the pregnancy, birthing and nurturing process, which is why we must continue to expand and center the needs of mothers in public and working spaces. Every mother is different, as is every child, and our ultimate goal should be to support and uplift all mothers, regardless of whether they choose to breastfeed.</p> <p>One personal breastfeeding experience of note was when I was able to use one of the Department of Health’s “lactation pods” at Brooklyn Children’s Museum. What struck me about my experience was how welcoming the environment was. Breastfeeding is often framed as an inconvenience, but in this instance, I felt proud and encouraged. The unfortunate reality is that this is an uncommon experience for breastfeeding mothers. More often than not, new mothers in the workplace have to seek out any space they can find — <a href="https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a21203672/why-women-stop-breastfeeding-pumping-at-work" target="_blank" rel="noopener">some report</a> even having to pump in a closet.&nbsp;This is inexcusable and detrimental to the dignity and well-being of working mothers everywhere.</p> <p>It is going to take a dedicated, comprehensive approach and a fundamental reimagining of working motherhood, but I know that we can achieve it. Moms continue to show up for each other,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.cbsnews.com/news/dozens-of-moms-breastfeed-outside-public-pool-in-protest-of-nursing-women-asked-to-leave" target="_blank" rel="noopener">time and time again</a>, but it is time we show up for them. We must stand with them and do everything in our power as individuals and as a collective society to better support their needs. Breastfeeding takes a village. It is a mental, physical, emotional, and logistical act. August is National Breastfeeding Awareness month, and so there is no better time than now to commit to a better tomorrow for mothers and children in New York City.</p> <p>***&nbsp;<br />Laurie Cumbo is the majority leader of the New York City Council. She represents Brooklyn communities of Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, Prospect Heights and parts of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant. On Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/cmlauriecumbo?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@cmlauriecumbo</a>.</p> <p>

***
Have an op-ed idea or submission for Gotham Gazette? Email opinion@gothamgazette.com

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/dc8tpaouwaal45h.jpg" alt="dc8tpaouwaal45h" width="600" height="352" /></p> <p>Council Member Laurie Cumbo, the author (right), with her son, Prince (photo:@cmlauriecumbo)</p> <hr /> <p>If we are truly committed to the health, well-being, and economic advancement of mothers and babies, we must examine our public spaces, work places, and cultural biases when it comes to supporting and accommodating a mother’s choice to breastfeed. As of only a few weeks ago, mothers can now breastfeed <a href="https://people.com/health/breastfeeding-public-legal-all-50-states" target="_blank" rel="noopener">legally</a> in all 50 states without fear of violating laws pertaining to indecent exposure or public obscenity. This is a low bar for celebration, and cause for a critical examination of our own local laws and societal norms.</p> <p>The benefits of breastfeeding are long-known and widely accepted in the medical community – the World Health Organization recommends that babies are breastfed for at least the first six months of their lives. The health benefits for babies include lower rates of obesity, SIDS, asthma, and other conditions, and can even be traced to higher IQs. For mothers, breastfeeding lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes, and certain types of ovarian and breast cancers. It is for these reasons, and for the purpose of defending a mother’s right to choose what they do with their bodies and how they take care of their children, that we must remain diligent in our efforts to identify and break down any barriers for mothers who choose to breastfeed.</p> <p>Those of us holding elected office must all leverage our positions and platforms to advance breastfeeding rights and awareness. We must make sure that mothers know all the facts about breastfeeding, what they are entitled to and what resources are available to them, should they choose to breastfeed.</p> <p>Here, in New York, we have strong laws and we are increasing our investment at the state and local level in support of breastfeeding mothers. I am proud to have made breastfeeding rights a focal point of my time in office, with legislation advancing greater education and access for those who need to breastfeed or express milk in public or in the workplace. Right now, the Mother’s Day Legislative Package, which I was proud to spearhead on my very own first Mother’s Day, has pending legislation that will expand accommodations for breastfeeding mothers in certain city spaces and in workplaces, as well as establish a standard lactation accommodation policy. I thank my colleagues, Council Members Robert Cornegy and Carlina Rivera, for their leadership and partnership on these breastfeeding bills. I am committed to seeing through these efforts and ensuring that our physical structures reflect our values of equity and inclusion.</p> <p>As a mother of a now one-year-old myself, I have a new appreciation for and understanding of the literal and figurative structures that play a role in the lives of New York mothers. From pre-natal care to childbirth and child rearing, there is a culture of expectation that women are just supposed to know how to take care of themselves and their children based on instinct alone. Far too many women are not getting the resources they need. Further, as recent research has shown, health concerns expressed during childbirth are often not taken seriously, resulting in a much higher mortality rates for black and Latina women. The truth is, we all need guidance and support throughout the pregnancy, birthing and nurturing process, which is why we must continue to expand and center the needs of mothers in public and working spaces. Every mother is different, as is every child, and our ultimate goal should be to support and uplift all mothers, regardless of whether they choose to breastfeed.</p> <p>One personal breastfeeding experience of note was when I was able to use one of the Department of Health’s “lactation pods” at Brooklyn Children’s Museum. What struck me about my experience was how welcoming the environment was. Breastfeeding is often framed as an inconvenience, but in this instance, I felt proud and encouraged. The unfortunate reality is that this is an uncommon experience for breastfeeding mothers. More often than not, new mothers in the workplace have to seek out any space they can find — <a href="https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a21203672/why-women-stop-breastfeeding-pumping-at-work" target="_blank" rel="noopener">some report</a> even having to pump in a closet.&nbsp;This is inexcusable and detrimental to the dignity and well-being of working mothers everywhere.</p> <p>It is going to take a dedicated, comprehensive approach and a fundamental reimagining of working motherhood, but I know that we can achieve it. Moms continue to show up for each other,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.cbsnews.com/news/dozens-of-moms-breastfeed-outside-public-pool-in-protest-of-nursing-women-asked-to-leave" target="_blank" rel="noopener">time and time again</a>, but it is time we show up for them. We must stand with them and do everything in our power as individuals and as a collective society to better support their needs. Breastfeeding takes a village. It is a mental, physical, emotional, and logistical act. August is National Breastfeeding Awareness month, and so there is no better time than now to commit to a better tomorrow for mothers and children in New York City.</p> <p>***&nbsp;<br />Laurie Cumbo is the majority leader of the New York City Council. She represents Brooklyn communities of Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, Prospect Heights and parts of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant. On Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/cmlauriecumbo?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@cmlauriecumbo</a>.</p> <p>

***
Have an op-ed idea or submission for Gotham Gazette? Email opinion@gothamgazette.com

</p>
Extending the Human Right of Health Care to All New Yorkers 2018-08-08T04:00:00+00:00 2018-08-08T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7853:extending-the-human-right-of-health-care-to-all-new-yorkers Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/c-johnson-brooklyn-credit.jpg" alt="c johnson brooklyn credit" width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>Speaker Johnson, the author, visits a health care facility (photo via John McCarten)</p> <hr /> <p>Health care for all is a human right. This means no one should be denied care based on their ability to pay.</p> <p>The World Health Organization recognized this fundamental truth 70 years ago, most countries around the world have been putting it into action for decades now, and doctors and nurses live it out professionally every day.</p> <p>Truly achieving this moral imperative means we need a universal health care system supported by taxes and administered by one provider. Not only is this the right thing to do, it’s also more practical and less expensive than the status quo.</p> <p><a href="https://www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR2424.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A recent study</a> conducted by the RAND Corporation shows that single-payer is likely to save our state health care system $15 billion by 2031 compared to our current system. Other estimates project savings of up to $45 billion.</p> <p>For these reasons I introduced a resolution Wednesday urging our state government to approve a law that would lay the foundation for single-payer healthcare in the Empire State. The proposal would create the New York Health program, which, if fully implemented, would result in 90 percent of New Yorkers spending less on health care than they currently do.</p> <p>The plan would help save New Yorkers money by cutting administrative costs and simplifying the present system. Approximately one million New Yorkers are without any health insurance and have essentially been priced out of the market, which is another practical reason why I support this legislation. Also, you, the patient, would pay no premiums, deductibles or co-payments when visiting a doctor under the new system.</p> <p>According to the RAND study, New Yorkers could spend half as much money out of their own pockets under the New York Health program than they do within the current system. In fact, according to a relatively conservative scenario, New Yorkers with an annual household compensation of less than $105,300 would save about $2,800 per person every year. Other estimates project even greater savings.</p> <p>Single-payer is traditionally viewed as a progressive cause, but it has earned support from conservative quarters too. RAND, which was originally founded to provide research to the armed forces, isn’t exactly a progressive endeavor.</p> <p>It is also worth noting that New York is a relatively wealthy state. Our economy is the third largest in the nation, behind California and Texas. And with a gross domestic product of $1.56 trillion, our economy is comparable to Canada’s, which has a $1.65 trillion GDP.</p> <p>That kind of prosperity is an advantage few states – and few countries, for that matter – enjoy, and it’s one we should leverage so as many New Yorkers as possible have access to good health care. Failing to do so would be an abdication of our responsibility as elected representatives.</p> <p>The current landscape is complicated and there are a lot of moving parts, but complexity shouldn’t be the enemy of what is right.</p> <p>President Trump’s administration has signaled it would oppose single-payer plans from state governments seeking to bring sanity to their respective health care landscapes, so it is unlikely his administration will grant New York the federal waivers needed for a single-payer system to be fully implemented here.</p> <p>However, even without a waiver, the state could still ramp up the program on a partial basis and, in the process, save money for current Medicare and Medicaid recipients through improved, wrap-around coverage. It would also lay the framework for full implementation of the plan under a new president.</p> <p>Critics on the other side of this debate have also argued that adequate health care shouldn’t be considered a right – that it is a finite resource and can’t be placed in the same category as voting or free speech.</p> <p>I disagree.</p> <p>Many human rights we now take for granted in the United States weren’t considered rights at all during various periods of history. But eventually we evolved to see them as such.</p> <p>The right to vote, freedom of speech, the right to assemble – these are now encoded into our nation’s DNA, but over the course of world history this wasn’t always the case.</p> <p>Even today, not everyone on earth has the right to vote. Many Americans didn’t have that right immediately after our nation was founded.</p> <p>But we’ve made progress – often that progress comes too slowly, but there is no progress until we take the first steps forward.</p> <p>Adopting single-payer healthcare in New York State would be an enormous step in the right direction. This is why I am standing with my colleagues in state government who support it, and I hope you will too.</p> <p>***<br /> Corey Johnson is the Speaker of the New York City Council and represents the Council’s 3rd District, in Manhattan. On Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/NYCSpeakerCoJo" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@NYCSpeakerCoJo</a>.</p> <p>

***
Have an op-ed idea or submission for Gotham Gazette? Email opinion@gothamgazette.com

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/c-johnson-brooklyn-credit.jpg" alt="c johnson brooklyn credit" width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>Speaker Johnson, the author, visits a health care facility (photo via John McCarten)</p> <hr /> <p>Health care for all is a human right. This means no one should be denied care based on their ability to pay.</p> <p>The World Health Organization recognized this fundamental truth 70 years ago, most countries around the world have been putting it into action for decades now, and doctors and nurses live it out professionally every day.</p> <p>Truly achieving this moral imperative means we need a universal health care system supported by taxes and administered by one provider. Not only is this the right thing to do, it’s also more practical and less expensive than the status quo.</p> <p><a href="https://www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR2424.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A recent study</a> conducted by the RAND Corporation shows that single-payer is likely to save our state health care system $15 billion by 2031 compared to our current system. Other estimates project savings of up to $45 billion.</p> <p>For these reasons I introduced a resolution Wednesday urging our state government to approve a law that would lay the foundation for single-payer healthcare in the Empire State. The proposal would create the New York Health program, which, if fully implemented, would result in 90 percent of New Yorkers spending less on health care than they currently do.</p> <p>The plan would help save New Yorkers money by cutting administrative costs and simplifying the present system. Approximately one million New Yorkers are without any health insurance and have essentially been priced out of the market, which is another practical reason why I support this legislation. Also, you, the patient, would pay no premiums, deductibles or co-payments when visiting a doctor under the new system.</p> <p>According to the RAND study, New Yorkers could spend half as much money out of their own pockets under the New York Health program than they do within the current system. In fact, according to a relatively conservative scenario, New Yorkers with an annual household compensation of less than $105,300 would save about $2,800 per person every year. Other estimates project even greater savings.</p> <p>Single-payer is traditionally viewed as a progressive cause, but it has earned support from conservative quarters too. RAND, which was originally founded to provide research to the armed forces, isn’t exactly a progressive endeavor.</p> <p>It is also worth noting that New York is a relatively wealthy state. Our economy is the third largest in the nation, behind California and Texas. And with a gross domestic product of $1.56 trillion, our economy is comparable to Canada’s, which has a $1.65 trillion GDP.</p> <p>That kind of prosperity is an advantage few states – and few countries, for that matter – enjoy, and it’s one we should leverage so as many New Yorkers as possible have access to good health care. Failing to do so would be an abdication of our responsibility as elected representatives.</p> <p>The current landscape is complicated and there are a lot of moving parts, but complexity shouldn’t be the enemy of what is right.</p> <p>President Trump’s administration has signaled it would oppose single-payer plans from state governments seeking to bring sanity to their respective health care landscapes, so it is unlikely his administration will grant New York the federal waivers needed for a single-payer system to be fully implemented here.</p> <p>However, even without a waiver, the state could still ramp up the program on a partial basis and, in the process, save money for current Medicare and Medicaid recipients through improved, wrap-around coverage. It would also lay the framework for full implementation of the plan under a new president.</p> <p>Critics on the other side of this debate have also argued that adequate health care shouldn’t be considered a right – that it is a finite resource and can’t be placed in the same category as voting or free speech.</p> <p>I disagree.</p> <p>Many human rights we now take for granted in the United States weren’t considered rights at all during various periods of history. But eventually we evolved to see them as such.</p> <p>The right to vote, freedom of speech, the right to assemble – these are now encoded into our nation’s DNA, but over the course of world history this wasn’t always the case.</p> <p>Even today, not everyone on earth has the right to vote. Many Americans didn’t have that right immediately after our nation was founded.</p> <p>But we’ve made progress – often that progress comes too slowly, but there is no progress until we take the first steps forward.</p> <p>Adopting single-payer healthcare in New York State would be an enormous step in the right direction. This is why I am standing with my colleagues in state government who support it, and I hope you will too.</p> <p>***<br /> Corey Johnson is the Speaker of the New York City Council and represents the Council’s 3rd District, in Manhattan. On Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/NYCSpeakerCoJo" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@NYCSpeakerCoJo</a>.</p> <p>

***
Have an op-ed idea or submission for Gotham Gazette? Email opinion@gothamgazette.com

</p>
The Week Ahead in New York Politics, August 6 2018-08-05T04:00:00+00:00 2018-08-05T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7842:the-week-ahead-in-new-york-politics-august-6 Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" alt="New York City Hall" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>There’s a state fundraising deadline on Thursday night, meaning candidates -- especially those in competitive party primaries -- for statewide and state legislative positions will be holding events and soliciting donations online for much of the week, hoping to bolster their abilities to get their messages out and affect the narrative around their candidacies and races heading into the final weeks before the September 13 primary and months before the November 6 general election.</p> <p>The primary is just five weeks from this Thursday.</p> <p>At this point, perhaps the most interesting and competitive statewide race is <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7839-undecided-leads-competitive-democratic-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the Democratic primary for Attorney General</a>, featuring four qualified candidates: Letitia James, Sean Patrick Maloney, Leecia Eve, and Zephyr Teachout. The candidates all shared a stage for the first time last week and attention on the race continues to heat up after a recent Siena poll <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7839-undecided-leads-competitive-democratic-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">showed that 42 percent of likely primary voters were undecided</a> in the race. There’s a televised debate scheduled for August 28 on NY1, but Teachout and Eve are calling for a handful of other broadcast debates. (The candidates have each been appearing on the Max &amp; Murphy podcast from Gotham Gazette and City Limits, with Rep. Maloney scheduled for this week. Hear interviews with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7791-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-zephyr-teachout" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Teachout</a>; <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7812-max-murphy-podcast-letitia-james-the-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">James</a>; and <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7824-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-leecia-eve" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Eve</a>.)</p> <p>The Democratic primary for Lieutenant Governor <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7838-in-wide-open-lieutenant-governor-primary-hochul-targets-votes-in-williams-backyard" target="_blank" rel="noopener">also appears wide open</a>, despite the fact that there is an incumbent, Kathy Hochul, running. The Siena poll <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7838-in-wide-open-lieutenant-governor-primary-hochul-targets-votes-in-williams-backyard" target="_blank" rel="noopener">showed almost 50 percent undecided</a> between Hochul and Jumaane Williams.</p> <p>It’s unclear, though, if polls are capturing the likely voter pool, especially given the energy on the progressive left, which would appear to be a boon for Teachout, Williams, and gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon, who was far behind incumbent Governor Andrew Cuomo in the Siena poll, which took into account “likely” primary voters in its modeling, though the Nixon campaign still questioned the sample Siena contacted and raised the question of whether even a better sample would truly gauge the electorate in today’s climate. We’ll know a lot more on September 13.</p> <p>We’re awaiting news on one or more debates between Cuomo and Nixon. The governor has vaguely said there will be a debate, but has not agreed to a specific one as of yet. Williams and Hochul appeared on the same stage recently, it is unclear when they may have one or more broadcast debates. The primary has become increasingly nasty, with criticisms over one another’s past issue stances, but also Hochul calling on Williams to release five years of his taxes, as he has pushed for President Trump to do, and releasing an ad attacking Williams for his personal financial troubles, including debt related to an unsuccessful small business and a home loan. Williams has responded by calling Hochul an out-of-touch elitist who has been silent in the face of corruption in state economic development programs, while others have also criticized Hochul’s ad targeting Williams’ finances. (Listen to the Max &amp; Murphy interviews <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7490-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-candidate-jumaane-williams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">with Williams</a> and <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7737-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-kathy-hochul" target="_blank" rel="noopener">with Hochul</a>.)</p> <p>And there are, of course, also quite a few competitive legislative primaries, including the challenges being waged against the former members of the Independent Democratic Conference of the state Senate. Six of the eight IDC districts include parts of New York City. The two candidates in one race, Manhattan’s Senate District 31, appeared on this past week’s Max &amp; Murphy show on WBAI. <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7836-max-murphy-podcast-manhattan-state-senate-rematch-centered-on-breakaway-democrats" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Listen to Senator Marisol Alcantara and challenger Robert Jackson discuss their race.</a> And this week on Max &amp; Murphy, Senator Tony Avella and challenger John Liu will appear (after Rep. Maloney).</p> <p>There are few Republican primaries across the state, as the party has coalesced around its statewide candidates and is not seeing the type of infighting that Democrats have playing out this summer. The GOP is trying to hold onto its last bastion of statewide power in control of the Senate, while also attempting to win a statewide race for the first time since Governor George Pataki won his third term in 2002.</p> <p>While the elections will increasingly be the focus as we head toward September, there is also governing and policy happening, including related to the MTA, NYCHA, NYPD, housing and neighborhood development, the taxi and for-hire vehicle industry (industries?), marijuana legalization, and more. Keep an eye out this week for news related to a federal monitor of NYCHA, movement in the NYPD departmental trial of two officers involved in Eric Garner’s death, and more, including for-hire vehicle regulations and land use decisions likely being passed by the City Council.</p> <p>There are also several interesting panel and other events to be aware of -- see our day-by-day rundown below.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>e-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>Monday<br /></strong>"On Monday, Mayor de Blasio will deliver remarks at the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees board meeting. This event is closed press." Later, at 4 p.m. at City Hall, "the Mayor will hold public hearings for and sign seven pieces of legislation: Int. 399-B, to require the Department of the Aging to report annually on senior center costs and utilization; Int. 411-A, to require annual inspections of senior centers that are also food service establishments; Int. 510-B and Int. 724-A regarding a bill of a rights for those seeking bail bond services; Int. 741-A, requiring the city to provide free domestic telephone service to individuals within the custody of the department of corrections; Int. 779-A, requires the Department of Correction to issue reports on the use tasers; and Int. 981-A, requires online short-term rental platforms to report data about those transactions to the Mayor’s Office of Special Enforcement. The Mayor will also hold a public hearing on Int. 157-C, which reduces permitted capacity for certain waste transfer stations in the Bronx, Queens, and Brooklyn. This event is open press. There will be no Q-and-A." And, in the evening, the Mayor will appear on NY1’s Inside City Hall in the 7 and 11 p.m. hours.</p> <p>On Monday at 11:30 a.m.,&nbsp;"Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams and Council Member Mark Treyger will lead a community rally denouncing a pattern of anti-Chinese graffiti found at several sites in Bensonhurst, urging the New York City Police Department (NYPD) to investigate and designate these acts as hate crimes. Joined by leaders in the Chinese-American community, as well as elected officials such as Assembly Member William Colton and District Leader Nancy Tong, they will address the profane graffiti discovered over the weekend and a greater trend of bias-based crimes that have been committed across Brooklyn in recent days, including an alleged subway attack on a South Korean national last month on a Coney Island-bound N train."</p> <p>At noon Monday,&nbsp;Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul will visit Judith C. White Senior Center in Manhattan with Senator Brad Hoylman.</p> <p>At&nbsp;2 p.m. Monday, New York Taxi Worker Alliance "app driver members, along with fellow NYTWA members who drive yellow, green, livery and black cars, will rally in Long Island City" in support of for-hire vehicle legislation in the City Council and to respond to the ad campaign by Uber and Lyft.</p> <p>This week's What's The [Data] Point? podcast from Gotham Gazette and Citizens Budget Commission will be recorded and published on Monday, and will focus on MTA finances.</p> <p>On Monday, Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney will launch&nbsp;"30 town halls across New York State in the next 30 days," beginning with a telephone town hall Monday evening, in his campaign for Attorney General of New York.</p> <p>At 7 p.m. Monday, gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon and lieutenant gubernatorial candidate Jumaane Williams will join activist Ady Barkan, journalist Shaun King, City Council Member Brad Lander, and others at Barkan’s <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/2112184042438789/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">“Be A Hero”</a> forum in Brooklyn. Speakers will discuss “rejuvenating our democracy and mobilizing the progressive movement to make bold, systemic changes in New York.” The event is being hosted by Working Families Party, Make the Road Action, NY Communities for Change, Center for Popular Democracy Action, and the Be A Hero Fund, and will take place at the Green Building in Gowanus.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday</strong><br />At the City Council on Tuesday: The Committee on Consumer Affairs will meet at 10:30 a.m. to discuss a proposed law allowing businesses selling tobacco products (save for cigarettes) 180 days to obtain a tobacco retail license if they have not done so already.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Tuesday, Republican nominee for Attorney General Keith Wofford <a href="https://www.manhattancc.org/common/Events/event_info.cfm?QID=28932&amp;ClientID=11099&amp;ThisPage=EventInfo" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will join</a> the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce to discuss his candidacy, as part of the Chamber’s “Attorney General Roundtable” series, open to Chamber members.</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Tuesday, the Board of Standards and Appeals will hold a public hearing at Spector Hall.</p> <p>On Tuesday, “Congressional Candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and NYS Attorney General Barbara Underwood will be appearing at the Immigrant Arts Summit at the Museum of Jewish Heritage. AG Underwood will be delivering a keynote address at 10AM and Ocasio-Cortez will be participating in a panel on mobilizing and organizing women through the arts at 10:30AM,” among other aspects of <a href="https://immigrantarts.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the summit</a>.</p> <p>Tuesday night is National Night Out Against Crime, with events all over the city, often in conjunction with local police precincts.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday</strong><br />The City Council will hold a stated meeting at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. Speaker Corey Johnson will likely host a pre-stated press conference at about 12:30 p.m.</p> <p>Also at the City Council on Wednesday:<br />--The Committee on Finance will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss resolutions calling on the state to give the city design-build authority for capital projects, calling for “additional financing by the Hudson Yards Infrastructure Corporation,” and “approving the new designation and changes in the designation of certain organizations to receive funding in the Expense Budget.”<br />--The Committee on Rules, Privileges, and Elections will meet at 10:30 a.m. to discuss the nomination of Health &amp; Hospitals President Mitchell Katz to the City’s Board of Health.</p> <p>At 8 a.m. Wednesday, the New York City Campaign Finance Board and New York Law School <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/panel-improving-nycs-campaign-finance-program-tickets-48137570770" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> a panel on “improving NYC’s campaign finance program.” Frederick Schaffer, the CFB Chair, will give introductory remarks, which will be followed by a panel consisting of Citizens Union Executive Director and former Public Advocate Betsy Gotbaum, former City Council Speaker and current President of Women in Need Christine Quinn, and City Council Members Ritchie Torres and Eric Ulrich.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Wednesday, Democratic Attorney General candidate Zephyr Teachout <a href="https://www.manhattancc.org/common/Events/event_info.cfm?QID=28933&amp;ClientID=11099&amp;ThisPage=EventInfo" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will join</a> the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce to discuss her candidacy, as part of the Chamber’s “Attorney General Roundtable” series, open to Chamber members.</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Wednesday, the City Planning Commission will hold a public meeting at 120 Broadway.</p> <p>At noon Wednesday, the New York State Board of Elections will hold a commissioners’ meeting in Albany.</p> <p>At 4 p.m. Wednesday, the Civilian Complaint Review Board will meet at 100 Church Street in Manhattan.</p> <p>This week's Max &amp; Murphy radio show/podcast will first air Wednesday from 5-6 p.m. on WBAI, 99.5FM and streaming at <a href="https://www.wbai.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">wbai.org</a>, and will feature three interviews: with U.S. Representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democratic candidate for New York Attorney General (Hear recent interviews with Maloney's opponents:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7791-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-zephyr-teachout">Zephyr Teachout</a>;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7812-max-murphy-podcast-letitia-james-the-attorney-general-primary">Letitia James</a>; and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7824-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-leecia-eve">Leecia Eve</a>.); State Senator Tony Avella of Queens; and Avella's Democratic primary challenger, former city Comptroller John Liu.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Wednesday, gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon <a href="https://actionnetwork.org/events/south-asian-round-table-with-cynthia-nixon?referrer=&amp;source=widget&amp;email_referrer=&amp;can_id=" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will join</a> a roundtable with Asian-American community leaders at Bellozino in Jackson Heights.</p> <p>On Wednesday at 6 p.m., “U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/manhattan-town-hall-tickets-48734456070" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> a town hall meeting at The Riverside Church in Morningside Heights. Gillibrand will take questions from constituents on issues ranging from health care to jobs and the economy. Last summer, Gillibrand hosted eight town halls across New York State, and this event will be the third of several more town halls Gillibrand will host around the state this year as part of her commitment to hearing from as many New Yorkers as possible.”</p> <p><strong>Thursday</strong><br />At 8 a.m. Thursday, the Association for a Better New York <a href="http://abny.org/meetinginfo.php?id=89&amp;ts=1531841088" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> a “Power Breakfast” discussing “how we’re spending” New York’s $89 billion budget and “what it means.” Panelists include Melanie Hartzog, the Mayor’s Budget Director; Carol Kellermann, President of the Citizens Budget Commission; Latonia McKinney, Director of the City Council’s Finance division; and Preston Niblack, the Deputy City Comptroller. David Goodman of The New York Times will moderate the event at the Hilton Hotel in Midtown.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Thursday, City &amp; State will host its <a href="https://www.cityandstateny.com/events/diversity-summit-awards" target="_blank" rel="noopener">“Diversity Summit &amp; Awards”</a> at 36 Battery Place in Manhattan, discussing New York’s diversity initiatives, particularly in the realm of contracting and partnerships between state and local government. New York Secretary of State Rossana Rosado will deliver the keynote address. Other speakers will include City Council Member Mark Gjonaj; State Senator James Sanders; Jonnel Doris, Director of the Mayor’s MWBE Office; Gregg Bishop, Commissioner of the Department of Small Business Services; Lisette Camillo, Commissioner of DCAS; Michael Garner, Chief Diversity Officer for the MTA; and others.</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Thursday, the New York City Campaign Finance Board will hold a board meeting at 100 Church Street.</p> <p><strong>Friday and the weekend</strong><br />Mayor de Blasio may make his weekly appearance on WNYC’s The Brian Lehrer Show on Friday at 10 a.m.</p> <p>***<br />Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Brachfeld and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@GothamGazette</a></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" alt="New York City Hall" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>There’s a state fundraising deadline on Thursday night, meaning candidates -- especially those in competitive party primaries -- for statewide and state legislative positions will be holding events and soliciting donations online for much of the week, hoping to bolster their abilities to get their messages out and affect the narrative around their candidacies and races heading into the final weeks before the September 13 primary and months before the November 6 general election.</p> <p>The primary is just five weeks from this Thursday.</p> <p>At this point, perhaps the most interesting and competitive statewide race is <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7839-undecided-leads-competitive-democratic-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the Democratic primary for Attorney General</a>, featuring four qualified candidates: Letitia James, Sean Patrick Maloney, Leecia Eve, and Zephyr Teachout. The candidates all shared a stage for the first time last week and attention on the race continues to heat up after a recent Siena poll <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7839-undecided-leads-competitive-democratic-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">showed that 42 percent of likely primary voters were undecided</a> in the race. There’s a televised debate scheduled for August 28 on NY1, but Teachout and Eve are calling for a handful of other broadcast debates. (The candidates have each been appearing on the Max &amp; Murphy podcast from Gotham Gazette and City Limits, with Rep. Maloney scheduled for this week. Hear interviews with&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7791-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-zephyr-teachout" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Teachout</a>; <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7812-max-murphy-podcast-letitia-james-the-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">James</a>; and <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7824-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-leecia-eve" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Eve</a>.)</p> <p>The Democratic primary for Lieutenant Governor <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7838-in-wide-open-lieutenant-governor-primary-hochul-targets-votes-in-williams-backyard" target="_blank" rel="noopener">also appears wide open</a>, despite the fact that there is an incumbent, Kathy Hochul, running. The Siena poll <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7838-in-wide-open-lieutenant-governor-primary-hochul-targets-votes-in-williams-backyard" target="_blank" rel="noopener">showed almost 50 percent undecided</a> between Hochul and Jumaane Williams.</p> <p>It’s unclear, though, if polls are capturing the likely voter pool, especially given the energy on the progressive left, which would appear to be a boon for Teachout, Williams, and gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon, who was far behind incumbent Governor Andrew Cuomo in the Siena poll, which took into account “likely” primary voters in its modeling, though the Nixon campaign still questioned the sample Siena contacted and raised the question of whether even a better sample would truly gauge the electorate in today’s climate. We’ll know a lot more on September 13.</p> <p>We’re awaiting news on one or more debates between Cuomo and Nixon. The governor has vaguely said there will be a debate, but has not agreed to a specific one as of yet. Williams and Hochul appeared on the same stage recently, it is unclear when they may have one or more broadcast debates. The primary has become increasingly nasty, with criticisms over one another’s past issue stances, but also Hochul calling on Williams to release five years of his taxes, as he has pushed for President Trump to do, and releasing an ad attacking Williams for his personal financial troubles, including debt related to an unsuccessful small business and a home loan. Williams has responded by calling Hochul an out-of-touch elitist who has been silent in the face of corruption in state economic development programs, while others have also criticized Hochul’s ad targeting Williams’ finances. (Listen to the Max &amp; Murphy interviews <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7490-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-candidate-jumaane-williams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">with Williams</a> and <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7737-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-kathy-hochul" target="_blank" rel="noopener">with Hochul</a>.)</p> <p>And there are, of course, also quite a few competitive legislative primaries, including the challenges being waged against the former members of the Independent Democratic Conference of the state Senate. Six of the eight IDC districts include parts of New York City. The two candidates in one race, Manhattan’s Senate District 31, appeared on this past week’s Max &amp; Murphy show on WBAI. <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7836-max-murphy-podcast-manhattan-state-senate-rematch-centered-on-breakaway-democrats" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Listen to Senator Marisol Alcantara and challenger Robert Jackson discuss their race.</a> And this week on Max &amp; Murphy, Senator Tony Avella and challenger John Liu will appear (after Rep. Maloney).</p> <p>There are few Republican primaries across the state, as the party has coalesced around its statewide candidates and is not seeing the type of infighting that Democrats have playing out this summer. The GOP is trying to hold onto its last bastion of statewide power in control of the Senate, while also attempting to win a statewide race for the first time since Governor George Pataki won his third term in 2002.</p> <p>While the elections will increasingly be the focus as we head toward September, there is also governing and policy happening, including related to the MTA, NYCHA, NYPD, housing and neighborhood development, the taxi and for-hire vehicle industry (industries?), marijuana legalization, and more. Keep an eye out this week for news related to a federal monitor of NYCHA, movement in the NYPD departmental trial of two officers involved in Eric Garner’s death, and more, including for-hire vehicle regulations and land use decisions likely being passed by the City Council.</p> <p>There are also several interesting panel and other events to be aware of -- see our day-by-day rundown below.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>e-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>Monday<br /></strong>"On Monday, Mayor de Blasio will deliver remarks at the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees board meeting. This event is closed press." Later, at 4 p.m. at City Hall, "the Mayor will hold public hearings for and sign seven pieces of legislation: Int. 399-B, to require the Department of the Aging to report annually on senior center costs and utilization; Int. 411-A, to require annual inspections of senior centers that are also food service establishments; Int. 510-B and Int. 724-A regarding a bill of a rights for those seeking bail bond services; Int. 741-A, requiring the city to provide free domestic telephone service to individuals within the custody of the department of corrections; Int. 779-A, requires the Department of Correction to issue reports on the use tasers; and Int. 981-A, requires online short-term rental platforms to report data about those transactions to the Mayor’s Office of Special Enforcement. The Mayor will also hold a public hearing on Int. 157-C, which reduces permitted capacity for certain waste transfer stations in the Bronx, Queens, and Brooklyn. This event is open press. There will be no Q-and-A." And, in the evening, the Mayor will appear on NY1’s Inside City Hall in the 7 and 11 p.m. hours.</p> <p>On Monday at 11:30 a.m.,&nbsp;"Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams and Council Member Mark Treyger will lead a community rally denouncing a pattern of anti-Chinese graffiti found at several sites in Bensonhurst, urging the New York City Police Department (NYPD) to investigate and designate these acts as hate crimes. Joined by leaders in the Chinese-American community, as well as elected officials such as Assembly Member William Colton and District Leader Nancy Tong, they will address the profane graffiti discovered over the weekend and a greater trend of bias-based crimes that have been committed across Brooklyn in recent days, including an alleged subway attack on a South Korean national last month on a Coney Island-bound N train."</p> <p>At noon Monday,&nbsp;Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul will visit Judith C. White Senior Center in Manhattan with Senator Brad Hoylman.</p> <p>At&nbsp;2 p.m. Monday, New York Taxi Worker Alliance "app driver members, along with fellow NYTWA members who drive yellow, green, livery and black cars, will rally in Long Island City" in support of for-hire vehicle legislation in the City Council and to respond to the ad campaign by Uber and Lyft.</p> <p>This week's What's The [Data] Point? podcast from Gotham Gazette and Citizens Budget Commission will be recorded and published on Monday, and will focus on MTA finances.</p> <p>On Monday, Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney will launch&nbsp;"30 town halls across New York State in the next 30 days," beginning with a telephone town hall Monday evening, in his campaign for Attorney General of New York.</p> <p>At 7 p.m. Monday, gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon and lieutenant gubernatorial candidate Jumaane Williams will join activist Ady Barkan, journalist Shaun King, City Council Member Brad Lander, and others at Barkan’s <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/2112184042438789/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">“Be A Hero”</a> forum in Brooklyn. Speakers will discuss “rejuvenating our democracy and mobilizing the progressive movement to make bold, systemic changes in New York.” The event is being hosted by Working Families Party, Make the Road Action, NY Communities for Change, Center for Popular Democracy Action, and the Be A Hero Fund, and will take place at the Green Building in Gowanus.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday</strong><br />At the City Council on Tuesday: The Committee on Consumer Affairs will meet at 10:30 a.m. to discuss a proposed law allowing businesses selling tobacco products (save for cigarettes) 180 days to obtain a tobacco retail license if they have not done so already.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Tuesday, Republican nominee for Attorney General Keith Wofford <a href="https://www.manhattancc.org/common/Events/event_info.cfm?QID=28932&amp;ClientID=11099&amp;ThisPage=EventInfo" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will join</a> the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce to discuss his candidacy, as part of the Chamber’s “Attorney General Roundtable” series, open to Chamber members.</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Tuesday, the Board of Standards and Appeals will hold a public hearing at Spector Hall.</p> <p>On Tuesday, “Congressional Candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and NYS Attorney General Barbara Underwood will be appearing at the Immigrant Arts Summit at the Museum of Jewish Heritage. AG Underwood will be delivering a keynote address at 10AM and Ocasio-Cortez will be participating in a panel on mobilizing and organizing women through the arts at 10:30AM,” among other aspects of <a href="https://immigrantarts.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the summit</a>.</p> <p>Tuesday night is National Night Out Against Crime, with events all over the city, often in conjunction with local police precincts.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday</strong><br />The City Council will hold a stated meeting at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. Speaker Corey Johnson will likely host a pre-stated press conference at about 12:30 p.m.</p> <p>Also at the City Council on Wednesday:<br />--The Committee on Finance will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss resolutions calling on the state to give the city design-build authority for capital projects, calling for “additional financing by the Hudson Yards Infrastructure Corporation,” and “approving the new designation and changes in the designation of certain organizations to receive funding in the Expense Budget.”<br />--The Committee on Rules, Privileges, and Elections will meet at 10:30 a.m. to discuss the nomination of Health &amp; Hospitals President Mitchell Katz to the City’s Board of Health.</p> <p>At 8 a.m. Wednesday, the New York City Campaign Finance Board and New York Law School <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/panel-improving-nycs-campaign-finance-program-tickets-48137570770" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> a panel on “improving NYC’s campaign finance program.” Frederick Schaffer, the CFB Chair, will give introductory remarks, which will be followed by a panel consisting of Citizens Union Executive Director and former Public Advocate Betsy Gotbaum, former City Council Speaker and current President of Women in Need Christine Quinn, and City Council Members Ritchie Torres and Eric Ulrich.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Wednesday, Democratic Attorney General candidate Zephyr Teachout <a href="https://www.manhattancc.org/common/Events/event_info.cfm?QID=28933&amp;ClientID=11099&amp;ThisPage=EventInfo" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will join</a> the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce to discuss her candidacy, as part of the Chamber’s “Attorney General Roundtable” series, open to Chamber members.</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Wednesday, the City Planning Commission will hold a public meeting at 120 Broadway.</p> <p>At noon Wednesday, the New York State Board of Elections will hold a commissioners’ meeting in Albany.</p> <p>At 4 p.m. Wednesday, the Civilian Complaint Review Board will meet at 100 Church Street in Manhattan.</p> <p>This week's Max &amp; Murphy radio show/podcast will first air Wednesday from 5-6 p.m. on WBAI, 99.5FM and streaming at <a href="https://www.wbai.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">wbai.org</a>, and will feature three interviews: with U.S. Representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democratic candidate for New York Attorney General (Hear recent interviews with Maloney's opponents:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7791-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-zephyr-teachout">Zephyr Teachout</a>;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7812-max-murphy-podcast-letitia-james-the-attorney-general-primary">Letitia James</a>; and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7824-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-leecia-eve">Leecia Eve</a>.); State Senator Tony Avella of Queens; and Avella's Democratic primary challenger, former city Comptroller John Liu.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Wednesday, gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Nixon <a href="https://actionnetwork.org/events/south-asian-round-table-with-cynthia-nixon?referrer=&amp;source=widget&amp;email_referrer=&amp;can_id=" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will join</a> a roundtable with Asian-American community leaders at Bellozino in Jackson Heights.</p> <p>On Wednesday at 6 p.m., “U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/manhattan-town-hall-tickets-48734456070" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> a town hall meeting at The Riverside Church in Morningside Heights. Gillibrand will take questions from constituents on issues ranging from health care to jobs and the economy. Last summer, Gillibrand hosted eight town halls across New York State, and this event will be the third of several more town halls Gillibrand will host around the state this year as part of her commitment to hearing from as many New Yorkers as possible.”</p> <p><strong>Thursday</strong><br />At 8 a.m. Thursday, the Association for a Better New York <a href="http://abny.org/meetinginfo.php?id=89&amp;ts=1531841088" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> a “Power Breakfast” discussing “how we’re spending” New York’s $89 billion budget and “what it means.” Panelists include Melanie Hartzog, the Mayor’s Budget Director; Carol Kellermann, President of the Citizens Budget Commission; Latonia McKinney, Director of the City Council’s Finance division; and Preston Niblack, the Deputy City Comptroller. David Goodman of The New York Times will moderate the event at the Hilton Hotel in Midtown.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Thursday, City &amp; State will host its <a href="https://www.cityandstateny.com/events/diversity-summit-awards" target="_blank" rel="noopener">“Diversity Summit &amp; Awards”</a> at 36 Battery Place in Manhattan, discussing New York’s diversity initiatives, particularly in the realm of contracting and partnerships between state and local government. New York Secretary of State Rossana Rosado will deliver the keynote address. Other speakers will include City Council Member Mark Gjonaj; State Senator James Sanders; Jonnel Doris, Director of the Mayor’s MWBE Office; Gregg Bishop, Commissioner of the Department of Small Business Services; Lisette Camillo, Commissioner of DCAS; Michael Garner, Chief Diversity Officer for the MTA; and others.</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Thursday, the New York City Campaign Finance Board will hold a board meeting at 100 Church Street.</p> <p><strong>Friday and the weekend</strong><br />Mayor de Blasio may make his weekly appearance on WNYC’s The Brian Lehrer Show on Friday at 10 a.m.</p> <p>***<br />Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Brachfeld and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@GothamGazette</a></p> The Week Ahead in New York Politics, July 30 2018-07-29T04:00:00+00:00 2018-07-29T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7833:the-week-ahead-in-new-york-politics-july-30 Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" alt="New York City Hall" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>Thursday of this week will mark six weeks until the September 13 primary elections (the <a href="https://www.elections.ny.gov/votingdeadlines.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">deadline to register to vote</a> and be eligible for a party primary is August 19 (the deadline to change party enrollment to vote in a party primary has long passed)). Expect competitive primaries to continue to heat up.</p> <p>It was a busy weekend of endorsement announcements as we head toward those primaries, especially in the most-contested races for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, and certain state Senate seats -- all on the Democratic side (Republicans have very few primaries across the state, and none for the four statewide state-level positions).</p> <p>Cynthia Nixon and Jumaane Williams officially endorsed each other on Sunday. Each has been backed by the Working Families Party and a number of other groups and officials, but they had yet to make it official in announcing support for each other. Candidates for governor and lieutenant governor are nominated separately in party primaries, then run as a ticket for the general election. Nixon and Williams are hoping to win their respective Democratic primary bids against Governor Andrew Cuomo and Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul.</p> <p>Nixon and Williams also received the endorsement this weekend of the New York City branch of the Democratic Socialists of America.</p> <p>On Saturday, "Brooklyn women leaders" launched “Brooklyn Women For Cuomo” to endorse and support Cuomo for another term. The women leaders are Public Advocate Letitia James, State Senators Roxanne Persaud and Velmanette Montgomery , and Assemblymembers Latrice Walker, Jaime Williams, and Tremaine Wright, and former Assemblymember Annette Robinson. Cuomo also received endorsements this weekend from NYCHA tenant leaders in Queens and from "The National Institute for Reproductive Health Action Fund PAC, formerly NARAL NY," which also endorsed Hochul.</p> <p>Public Advocate Letitia James, a Democratic candidate for attorney general, was endorsed this weekend by Comptroller Scott Stringer and several elected officials from the Upper West Side.</p> <p>And, City Council Member Carlina Rivera endorsed state Senate candidates Julia Salazar and Jessica Ramos.</p> <p>More endorsements will be coming in this week, and there is other governmental and political business on the calendar -- see our day-by-day rundown below. We’re also awaiting news regarding any special state legislative session in Albany to extend the city’s speed camera program, which has expired, regarding the naming of a federal monitor for NYCHA, regarding next steps in the NYPD trials of the two officers being brought up on departmental charges in the death of Eric Garner, regarding how the Uber-City Council fight will play out as the Council moves ahead with bills that Uber and other for-hire vehicle companies are opposing, and more.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>e-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>Monday<br /></strong>At 10 a.m. Monday at City Hall, the City Council “Committee on Standards and Ethics will hold a meeting regarding Section 10.80 of the Council Rules.” This appears to be the next step after a prior initial meeting dealing with <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7806-city-council-investigating-diaz-sr-s-use-of-government-email-for-political-messages" target="_blank" rel="noopener">an allegation against City Council Member Ruben Diaz, Sr. that he improperly used his government email to send political messages</a>.</p> <p>On Monday at 11 a.m. outside City Hall, 10 of the City Council’s 11 female members will endorse Public Advocate Letitia James for Attorney General.</p> <p>At 11 a.m. Monday, NYCHA interim chair Stanley Brezenoff and Health and Mental Hygiene Assistant Commissioner Javier Lopez will announce the launch of “Smoke-Free NYCHA” at the Jerome L. Greene Family Center in Chelsea. Per federal regulations, <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7318-nycha-prepares-to-implement-smoking-ban" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NYCHA is adopting the somewhat controversial no-smoking policy</a>.</p> <p>On Monday at 11 a.m. in Bushwick, “Revel Transit will hold a press conference to launch the first ever shared electric moped service in New York City...Revel Transit is a brand new, New York-based company that will initially provide users access to electric mopeds in the neighborhoods of Bushwick, Greenpoint and Williamsburg. This service is the first of its kind in New York City but follows a model that is wildly popular in global cities such as Berlin and Paris. The mopeds are perfect for short- and medium-range trips and will add a unique option to New York’s diverse transit network.” City Council Member Antonio Reynoso will participate in Monday’s launch event.</p> <p>At 1 p.m. Monday, Governor Cuomo will make an announcement at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. Lieutenant Governor Hochul will participate.</p> <p>“On Monday, First Lady Chirlane McCray will tour the Kingsbridge Heights Community Center with New York State Senator Gustavo Rivera and participate in a roundtable discussion with clients. This event is closed press. Later, the First Lady will participate in a “Teatime Inspiration” event focused on mental health and wellness with Kate Spade New York employees. This event is closed press.”</p> <p>Mayor Bill de Blasio will make his weekly appearance on NY1’s Inside City Hall Monday in the 7 and 11 p.m. hours.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday</strong><br />At 8 a.m. Tuesday, the Center for an Urban Future will host a forum on New York’s aging park infrastructure at the Greene Space in the West Village. City Council Member Barry Grodenchik will give introductory remarks, which will be followed by a one-on-one conversation with Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver and a panel discussion with former Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe, Susan Donoghue of the Prospect Park Alliance, Lynn Kelly of New Yorkers for Parks, Nilka Martell of Loving the Bronx, and Charles McKinney, former Principal Urban Designer at NYC Parks.</p> <p>On Tuesday at 9 a.m.,&nbsp;"Chancellor Richard A. Carranza will deliver brief remarks at the School Technology Summit" at Beacon High School.</p> <p>On Tuesday morning, City Council Member Jumaane D. Williams “will begin his trial in New York County Criminal Court for charges related to his arrest while trying to stop the unlawful detention and imminent deportation of immigrant rights activist Ravi Ragbir. He now faces charges of Obstruction of an Emergency Vehicle and Obstructing Government Administration. Williams will be available to speak to the media prior to the start of the trial, at 9:15am, outside the New York County Criminal Court. He will appear with his attorneys, Rhiya Trivedi and Ron Kuby.”</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Tuesday at Brooklyn Borough Hall, "Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams will be joined by Food Bank For New York City COO Lisa Hines-Johnson to launch Brooklyn's participation in Food Bank’s “Woman to Woman” campaign — a donation drive to collect feminine care products and address the critical needs of women and girls living in poverty."</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Tuesday, Governor Cuomo will make an announcement at LaGuardia Airport.</p> <p>At 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, the Joint Commission on Public Ethics will hold a commissioners’ meeting.</p> <p>On Tuesday at 11:30 a.m., “Calling on Mayor de Blasio to embrace their newly proposed “Fast Bus, Fair City” plan, riders will turn the City Hall steps into a stage and dramatize their daily struggles riding New York’s local buses. The riders’ performance will demonstrate how their proven suite of transit policy changes will enhance quality of life and social inclusion for more than two million daily bus riders. Then the coalition and local elected officials will elaborate on the specific components of the call and why they are important. “Fast Bus, Fair City” would complement the City’s adoption of Fair Fares and the MTA’s Bus Plan. Once set in motion, all three could provide unparalleled access to city neighborhoods and resources, ensuring that the mayor’s own goal of making New York the fairest big city in America is fully realized.” Participants include Riders Alliance, NYPIRG Straphangers Campaign, Transit Center, Tri-State Transportation Campaign, New York League of Conservation Voters, elected officials, and bus riders.</p> <p>At the City Council on Tuesday: The Committee on Parks and Recreation will meet at 1 p.m. to discuss “the naming of one thoroughfare and public place, Jean-Jacques Dessalines Boulevard in the Borough of Brooklyn.”</p> <p>On Tuesday at 1 p.m. at City Hall,&nbsp;"State Senator Tony Avella, Assembly Member William Colton, and Council Member Bob Holden will stand with community groups Coalition EDU and the Chinese American Citizens Alliance to reveal their legislation aimed at saving the Specialized High School Exam."</p> <p>At 2 p.m. Tuesday, Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul will make an announcement at Brooklyn Public Library's main branch, Grand Army Plaza.</p> <p>At 4 p.m. Tuesday, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will&nbsp;deliver remarks at the Matthews-Palmer Playground ribbon cutting with Parks Commissioner Silver and other elected officials.</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, the mayor’s Charter Revision Commission will hold a public hearing at McKee High School in St. George, Staten Island. This is the last of a new round of public hearings in each borough after the release of the commission’s preliminary staff report. Recommendations from the commission that will be on the ballot in November for voters to approve or disapprove, are due out by September 7.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday</strong><br />This week’s <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/podcasts/max-murphy-on-politics" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Max &amp; Murphy</a> show on WBAI radio will feature interviews with State Senator Marisol Alcantara, a former member of the Independent Democratic Conference from Manhattan, and her Democratic primary opponent Robert Jackson. Tune in at 5pm Wednesday on WBAI, 99.5FM or wbai.org. The Max &amp; Murphy podcast recently moved to WBAI, with the <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/podcasts/max-murphy-on-politics" target="_blank" rel="noopener">first two shows</a> featuring interviews with Democratic Attorney General candidates <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7812-max-murphy-podcast-letitia-james-the-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Letitia James</a>, Zephyr Teachout, and <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7824-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-leecia-eve" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Leecia Eve</a> (the fourth candidate in the primary, Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, will be a guest on the show on August 8). The show is still available as a podcast if you can't or prefer not to listen live.</p> <p><strong>Thursday</strong><br />At the City Council on Thursday:<br />--The Subcommittee on Zoning and Franchises will meet at 9:30 a.m.<br />--The Subcommittee on Planning, Dispositions, and Concessions will meet at 9:45 a.m.<br />--The Committee on Land Use will meet at 10 a.m.<br />--The Subcommittee on Zoning and Franchises will meet at noon.</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Thursday, City &amp; State <a href="https://www.cityandstateny.com/events/brooklyn-power-50" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will celebrate</a> its “Brooklyn Power 50” list at a reception at the Brooklyn Bridge Marriott. Borough President Eric Adams will deliver keynote remarks.</p> <p>At 7 p.m. Thursday, Indivisible Westchester <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/where-they-stand-nys-attorney-general-democratic-candidate-forum-tickets-47914382207" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> a forum for Democratic Attorney General candidates at the Ethical Culture Society of Westchester in White Plains. The participating candidates are expected to be Letitia James, Zephyr Teachout, Sean Patrick Maloney, and Leecia Eve. The forum will be moderated by Damon Jones of the Westchester Black Political Conference.</p> <p><strong>Friday and the weekend</strong><br />Mayor de Blasio may make his weekly appearance on WNYC’s The Brian Lehrer Show on Friday at 10 a.m.</p> <p>De Blasio will leave on Friday afternoon for&nbsp;this year’s Netroots Nation conference in New Orleans, where he will be until Sunday morning, when he returns to New York City. According to the mayor's office, he will have a series of policy meetings with local and national elected officials and activists while he's there, and he’ll address the gathering’s attendees Saturday evening. He'll also have a few political meetings while there.</p> <p>***<br />Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Brachfeld and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@GothamGazette</a></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" alt="New York City Hall" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>Thursday of this week will mark six weeks until the September 13 primary elections (the <a href="https://www.elections.ny.gov/votingdeadlines.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">deadline to register to vote</a> and be eligible for a party primary is August 19 (the deadline to change party enrollment to vote in a party primary has long passed)). Expect competitive primaries to continue to heat up.</p> <p>It was a busy weekend of endorsement announcements as we head toward those primaries, especially in the most-contested races for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, and certain state Senate seats -- all on the Democratic side (Republicans have very few primaries across the state, and none for the four statewide state-level positions).</p> <p>Cynthia Nixon and Jumaane Williams officially endorsed each other on Sunday. Each has been backed by the Working Families Party and a number of other groups and officials, but they had yet to make it official in announcing support for each other. Candidates for governor and lieutenant governor are nominated separately in party primaries, then run as a ticket for the general election. Nixon and Williams are hoping to win their respective Democratic primary bids against Governor Andrew Cuomo and Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul.</p> <p>Nixon and Williams also received the endorsement this weekend of the New York City branch of the Democratic Socialists of America.</p> <p>On Saturday, "Brooklyn women leaders" launched “Brooklyn Women For Cuomo” to endorse and support Cuomo for another term. The women leaders are Public Advocate Letitia James, State Senators Roxanne Persaud and Velmanette Montgomery , and Assemblymembers Latrice Walker, Jaime Williams, and Tremaine Wright, and former Assemblymember Annette Robinson. Cuomo also received endorsements this weekend from NYCHA tenant leaders in Queens and from "The National Institute for Reproductive Health Action Fund PAC, formerly NARAL NY," which also endorsed Hochul.</p> <p>Public Advocate Letitia James, a Democratic candidate for attorney general, was endorsed this weekend by Comptroller Scott Stringer and several elected officials from the Upper West Side.</p> <p>And, City Council Member Carlina Rivera endorsed state Senate candidates Julia Salazar and Jessica Ramos.</p> <p>More endorsements will be coming in this week, and there is other governmental and political business on the calendar -- see our day-by-day rundown below. We’re also awaiting news regarding any special state legislative session in Albany to extend the city’s speed camera program, which has expired, regarding the naming of a federal monitor for NYCHA, regarding next steps in the NYPD trials of the two officers being brought up on departmental charges in the death of Eric Garner, regarding how the Uber-City Council fight will play out as the Council moves ahead with bills that Uber and other for-hire vehicle companies are opposing, and more.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>e-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>Monday<br /></strong>At 10 a.m. Monday at City Hall, the City Council “Committee on Standards and Ethics will hold a meeting regarding Section 10.80 of the Council Rules.” This appears to be the next step after a prior initial meeting dealing with <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7806-city-council-investigating-diaz-sr-s-use-of-government-email-for-political-messages" target="_blank" rel="noopener">an allegation against City Council Member Ruben Diaz, Sr. that he improperly used his government email to send political messages</a>.</p> <p>On Monday at 11 a.m. outside City Hall, 10 of the City Council’s 11 female members will endorse Public Advocate Letitia James for Attorney General.</p> <p>At 11 a.m. Monday, NYCHA interim chair Stanley Brezenoff and Health and Mental Hygiene Assistant Commissioner Javier Lopez will announce the launch of “Smoke-Free NYCHA” at the Jerome L. Greene Family Center in Chelsea. Per federal regulations, <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7318-nycha-prepares-to-implement-smoking-ban" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NYCHA is adopting the somewhat controversial no-smoking policy</a>.</p> <p>On Monday at 11 a.m. in Bushwick, “Revel Transit will hold a press conference to launch the first ever shared electric moped service in New York City...Revel Transit is a brand new, New York-based company that will initially provide users access to electric mopeds in the neighborhoods of Bushwick, Greenpoint and Williamsburg. This service is the first of its kind in New York City but follows a model that is wildly popular in global cities such as Berlin and Paris. The mopeds are perfect for short- and medium-range trips and will add a unique option to New York’s diverse transit network.” City Council Member Antonio Reynoso will participate in Monday’s launch event.</p> <p>At 1 p.m. Monday, Governor Cuomo will make an announcement at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. Lieutenant Governor Hochul will participate.</p> <p>“On Monday, First Lady Chirlane McCray will tour the Kingsbridge Heights Community Center with New York State Senator Gustavo Rivera and participate in a roundtable discussion with clients. This event is closed press. Later, the First Lady will participate in a “Teatime Inspiration” event focused on mental health and wellness with Kate Spade New York employees. This event is closed press.”</p> <p>Mayor Bill de Blasio will make his weekly appearance on NY1’s Inside City Hall Monday in the 7 and 11 p.m. hours.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday</strong><br />At 8 a.m. Tuesday, the Center for an Urban Future will host a forum on New York’s aging park infrastructure at the Greene Space in the West Village. City Council Member Barry Grodenchik will give introductory remarks, which will be followed by a one-on-one conversation with Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver and a panel discussion with former Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe, Susan Donoghue of the Prospect Park Alliance, Lynn Kelly of New Yorkers for Parks, Nilka Martell of Loving the Bronx, and Charles McKinney, former Principal Urban Designer at NYC Parks.</p> <p>On Tuesday at 9 a.m.,&nbsp;"Chancellor Richard A. Carranza will deliver brief remarks at the School Technology Summit" at Beacon High School.</p> <p>On Tuesday morning, City Council Member Jumaane D. Williams “will begin his trial in New York County Criminal Court for charges related to his arrest while trying to stop the unlawful detention and imminent deportation of immigrant rights activist Ravi Ragbir. He now faces charges of Obstruction of an Emergency Vehicle and Obstructing Government Administration. Williams will be available to speak to the media prior to the start of the trial, at 9:15am, outside the New York County Criminal Court. He will appear with his attorneys, Rhiya Trivedi and Ron Kuby.”</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Tuesday at Brooklyn Borough Hall, "Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams will be joined by Food Bank For New York City COO Lisa Hines-Johnson to launch Brooklyn's participation in Food Bank’s “Woman to Woman” campaign — a donation drive to collect feminine care products and address the critical needs of women and girls living in poverty."</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Tuesday, Governor Cuomo will make an announcement at LaGuardia Airport.</p> <p>At 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, the Joint Commission on Public Ethics will hold a commissioners’ meeting.</p> <p>On Tuesday at 11:30 a.m., “Calling on Mayor de Blasio to embrace their newly proposed “Fast Bus, Fair City” plan, riders will turn the City Hall steps into a stage and dramatize their daily struggles riding New York’s local buses. The riders’ performance will demonstrate how their proven suite of transit policy changes will enhance quality of life and social inclusion for more than two million daily bus riders. Then the coalition and local elected officials will elaborate on the specific components of the call and why they are important. “Fast Bus, Fair City” would complement the City’s adoption of Fair Fares and the MTA’s Bus Plan. Once set in motion, all three could provide unparalleled access to city neighborhoods and resources, ensuring that the mayor’s own goal of making New York the fairest big city in America is fully realized.” Participants include Riders Alliance, NYPIRG Straphangers Campaign, Transit Center, Tri-State Transportation Campaign, New York League of Conservation Voters, elected officials, and bus riders.</p> <p>At the City Council on Tuesday: The Committee on Parks and Recreation will meet at 1 p.m. to discuss “the naming of one thoroughfare and public place, Jean-Jacques Dessalines Boulevard in the Borough of Brooklyn.”</p> <p>On Tuesday at 1 p.m. at City Hall,&nbsp;"State Senator Tony Avella, Assembly Member William Colton, and Council Member Bob Holden will stand with community groups Coalition EDU and the Chinese American Citizens Alliance to reveal their legislation aimed at saving the Specialized High School Exam."</p> <p>At 2 p.m. Tuesday, Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul will make an announcement at Brooklyn Public Library's main branch, Grand Army Plaza.</p> <p>At 4 p.m. Tuesday, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will&nbsp;deliver remarks at the Matthews-Palmer Playground ribbon cutting with Parks Commissioner Silver and other elected officials.</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, the mayor’s Charter Revision Commission will hold a public hearing at McKee High School in St. George, Staten Island. This is the last of a new round of public hearings in each borough after the release of the commission’s preliminary staff report. Recommendations from the commission that will be on the ballot in November for voters to approve or disapprove, are due out by September 7.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday</strong><br />This week’s <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/podcasts/max-murphy-on-politics" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Max &amp; Murphy</a> show on WBAI radio will feature interviews with State Senator Marisol Alcantara, a former member of the Independent Democratic Conference from Manhattan, and her Democratic primary opponent Robert Jackson. Tune in at 5pm Wednesday on WBAI, 99.5FM or wbai.org. The Max &amp; Murphy podcast recently moved to WBAI, with the <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/podcasts/max-murphy-on-politics" target="_blank" rel="noopener">first two shows</a> featuring interviews with Democratic Attorney General candidates <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7812-max-murphy-podcast-letitia-james-the-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Letitia James</a>, Zephyr Teachout, and <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7824-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-leecia-eve" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Leecia Eve</a> (the fourth candidate in the primary, Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, will be a guest on the show on August 8). The show is still available as a podcast if you can't or prefer not to listen live.</p> <p><strong>Thursday</strong><br />At the City Council on Thursday:<br />--The Subcommittee on Zoning and Franchises will meet at 9:30 a.m.<br />--The Subcommittee on Planning, Dispositions, and Concessions will meet at 9:45 a.m.<br />--The Committee on Land Use will meet at 10 a.m.<br />--The Subcommittee on Zoning and Franchises will meet at noon.</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Thursday, City &amp; State <a href="https://www.cityandstateny.com/events/brooklyn-power-50" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will celebrate</a> its “Brooklyn Power 50” list at a reception at the Brooklyn Bridge Marriott. Borough President Eric Adams will deliver keynote remarks.</p> <p>At 7 p.m. Thursday, Indivisible Westchester <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/where-they-stand-nys-attorney-general-democratic-candidate-forum-tickets-47914382207" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> a forum for Democratic Attorney General candidates at the Ethical Culture Society of Westchester in White Plains. The participating candidates are expected to be Letitia James, Zephyr Teachout, Sean Patrick Maloney, and Leecia Eve. The forum will be moderated by Damon Jones of the Westchester Black Political Conference.</p> <p><strong>Friday and the weekend</strong><br />Mayor de Blasio may make his weekly appearance on WNYC’s The Brian Lehrer Show on Friday at 10 a.m.</p> <p>De Blasio will leave on Friday afternoon for&nbsp;this year’s Netroots Nation conference in New Orleans, where he will be until Sunday morning, when he returns to New York City. According to the mayor's office, he will have a series of policy meetings with local and national elected officials and activists while he's there, and he’ll address the gathering’s attendees Saturday evening. He'll also have a few political meetings while there.</p> <p>***<br />Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Brachfeld and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@GothamGazette</a></p> We Need Commercial Waste Reform, and Now We Have a Plan 2018-07-19T04:00:00+00:00 2018-07-19T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7816:we-need-commercial-waste-reform-and-now-we-have-a-plan Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/city-council-cm-cornegy.jpg" alt="city council cm cornegy" width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>Council Member Cornegy, the author (photo: Emil Cohen/City Council)</p> <hr /> <p>New Yorkers have good reason to be concerned, even angry, about the state of affairs in our city's commercial waste industry. Stakeholders and commentators are absolutely right to note that, among other issues to address, the tragic loss of life in this industry is unacceptable.</p> <p>However, agreement on the importance of cleaning up commercial waste carting does not change the fact that a huge question is still on the table: How can we actually achieve our shared goals as quickly and effectively as possible?</p> <p>In many ways, the answer lies in comments made just this week by Mayor de Blasio, when he said, "I hope that we can really strengthen the hand of the Business Integrity Commission, give them a lot more tools, a lot more teeth to work with in their regulation of that industry."</p> <p>My colleagues in the City Council and I have introduced legislation, known as Intro. 996, which would do that by empowering the Business Integrity Commission (BIC) to raise standards in the commercial waste industry and hold bad actors accountable.</p> <p>Our bill would enable BIC to create standardized safety certifications for industry employees and institute requirements that ensure workers are properly trained. It would also give BIC the tools to establish clear rules regarding allowable levels of emissions for commercial waste trucks. Additionally, the bill would empower BIC to more stringently regulate the industry with regard to maximizing efficiency along each waste collection route.</p> <p>These are just several examples of how Intro. 996 would give BIC more of the tools and teeth that Mayor de Blasio has said are necessary for advancing commercial waste carting reforms. Our legislation would also let BIC establish its own task force to offer additional insight and recommendations for continuing to improve this industry over the long-term.</p> <p>On the other hand, Mayor de Blasio's own Department of Sanitation has offered a nebulous and flawed proposal to develop commercial waste zones, which would replace the industry's current open market system with a series of geographic zones that are exclusively contracted to a small number of waste carters.</p> <p>First, Sanitation’s proposal is not squarely focused on advancing the mayor's stated goal of empowering BIC. By relying on a fundamental restructuring of the industry, this plan would essentially take power away from BIC rather than giving it more of the tools it needs to regulate carting companies.</p> <p>There is also the issue of unintended consequences. It is common knowledge by now that the zone-based waste collection plan implemented last year in Los Angeles had a truly disastrous rollout. Prices and service complaints skyrocketed, leading to a chaotic situation that, if it were to happen in New York, would surely make it extremely difficult to achieve our shared goals.</p> <p>The Department of Sanitation’s own <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/bic/downloads/pdf/pr/private_carting_release_2016_16_8.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">2016 report</a>, released as part of introducing its waste zone proposal, acknowledged that costs for small businesses that are served by this industry would increase under a zone-based plan. Additionally, the report acknowledged that zones would lead to job losses in the industry - and I do not think that efforts to increase safety have to include putting people out of work.</p> <p>To be clear, I am ready to advance commercial waste carting reforms now and deliver results on increasing safety, reducing environmental impact and increasing regulatory oversight. And I want to achieve this in the way that Mayor de Blasio himself has articulated - by giving BIC more of the tools and teeth it needs.</p> <p>Now is the time to translate our concerns about this industry into tangible, sensible, and effective action - we just need to get it done.</p> <p>***<br /> Robert E. Cornegy, Jr. represents the central Brooklyn communities of Bedford Stuyvesant and northern Crown Heights in the New York City Council. On Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/RobertCornegyJr" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@RobertCornegyJr</a>.</p> <p>

***
Have an op-ed idea or submission for Gotham Gazette? Email opinion@gothamgazette.com

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/city-council-cm-cornegy.jpg" alt="city council cm cornegy" width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>Council Member Cornegy, the author (photo: Emil Cohen/City Council)</p> <hr /> <p>New Yorkers have good reason to be concerned, even angry, about the state of affairs in our city's commercial waste industry. Stakeholders and commentators are absolutely right to note that, among other issues to address, the tragic loss of life in this industry is unacceptable.</p> <p>However, agreement on the importance of cleaning up commercial waste carting does not change the fact that a huge question is still on the table: How can we actually achieve our shared goals as quickly and effectively as possible?</p> <p>In many ways, the answer lies in comments made just this week by Mayor de Blasio, when he said, "I hope that we can really strengthen the hand of the Business Integrity Commission, give them a lot more tools, a lot more teeth to work with in their regulation of that industry."</p> <p>My colleagues in the City Council and I have introduced legislation, known as Intro. 996, which would do that by empowering the Business Integrity Commission (BIC) to raise standards in the commercial waste industry and hold bad actors accountable.</p> <p>Our bill would enable BIC to create standardized safety certifications for industry employees and institute requirements that ensure workers are properly trained. It would also give BIC the tools to establish clear rules regarding allowable levels of emissions for commercial waste trucks. Additionally, the bill would empower BIC to more stringently regulate the industry with regard to maximizing efficiency along each waste collection route.</p> <p>These are just several examples of how Intro. 996 would give BIC more of the tools and teeth that Mayor de Blasio has said are necessary for advancing commercial waste carting reforms. Our legislation would also let BIC establish its own task force to offer additional insight and recommendations for continuing to improve this industry over the long-term.</p> <p>On the other hand, Mayor de Blasio's own Department of Sanitation has offered a nebulous and flawed proposal to develop commercial waste zones, which would replace the industry's current open market system with a series of geographic zones that are exclusively contracted to a small number of waste carters.</p> <p>First, Sanitation’s proposal is not squarely focused on advancing the mayor's stated goal of empowering BIC. By relying on a fundamental restructuring of the industry, this plan would essentially take power away from BIC rather than giving it more of the tools it needs to regulate carting companies.</p> <p>There is also the issue of unintended consequences. It is common knowledge by now that the zone-based waste collection plan implemented last year in Los Angeles had a truly disastrous rollout. Prices and service complaints skyrocketed, leading to a chaotic situation that, if it were to happen in New York, would surely make it extremely difficult to achieve our shared goals.</p> <p>The Department of Sanitation’s own <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/bic/downloads/pdf/pr/private_carting_release_2016_16_8.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">2016 report</a>, released as part of introducing its waste zone proposal, acknowledged that costs for small businesses that are served by this industry would increase under a zone-based plan. Additionally, the report acknowledged that zones would lead to job losses in the industry - and I do not think that efforts to increase safety have to include putting people out of work.</p> <p>To be clear, I am ready to advance commercial waste carting reforms now and deliver results on increasing safety, reducing environmental impact and increasing regulatory oversight. And I want to achieve this in the way that Mayor de Blasio himself has articulated - by giving BIC more of the tools and teeth it needs.</p> <p>Now is the time to translate our concerns about this industry into tangible, sensible, and effective action - we just need to get it done.</p> <p>***<br /> Robert E. Cornegy, Jr. represents the central Brooklyn communities of Bedford Stuyvesant and northern Crown Heights in the New York City Council. On Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/RobertCornegyJr" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@RobertCornegyJr</a>.</p> <p>

***
Have an op-ed idea or submission for Gotham Gazette? Email opinion@gothamgazette.com

</p>
City Council Investigating Diaz Sr.'s Use of Government Email for Political Messages 2018-07-16T04:00:00+00:00 2018-07-16T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7806:city-council-investigating-diaz-sr-s-use-of-government-email-for-political-messages Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/27952025287_d781999108_z.jpg" alt="Ruben Diaz Sr. City Council " width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>CM Diaz Sr., standing (photo: John McCarten/City Council)</p> <hr /> <p>The New York City Council’s Committee on Standards and Ethics held a hearing on Monday concerning Bronx Council Member Ruben Diaz, Sr. and his alleged use of government email to send out political messages to colleagues and staffers across the Council, three knowledgeable sources told Gotham Gazette.</p> <p>The Standard and Ethics committee, chaired by Staten Island Council Member Steven Matteo, would not reveal the subject of Monday’s hearing and only noted on its agenda that the hearing was about Section 10.80 of the Council rules, which covers “disorderly behavior” including “willful violation or evasion of any provision of law relating to such Member’s discharge of his or her official duties; commission of fraud upon the City; conversion of public property to such Member’s own use; knowingly permitting or allowing by gross culpable conduct, any other person to convert public property; or violation of the Speaker’s policy or policies against discrimination and harassment.”</p> <p>The committee met Monday at City Hall and immediately went into closed session, emerging to divulge that it would indeed further investigate an allegation of impropriety, but without providing details as to the member, the subject matter at hand, or how it had come to the committee's attention.</p> <p>Members of the Council are bound by the city’s Conflicts of Interest law, contained in Chapter 68 of the City Charter, which prohibits city officials from using government time and resources for campaign-related purposes. According to one Council source who asked to remain anonymous to speak freely, Diaz Sr. has frequently sent out emails from his government account with his thoughts on issues he has worked on and those emails often crossed the line into political activity. A second Council source confirmed that the hearing was about Diaz Sr. and his emails, while a third said Diaz Sr. was the subject of the committee hearing, having to do with use of government resources for political purposes.</p> <p>The emails mirror Diaz Sr.’s “What You Should Know” dispatches that he sent out when he was a state Senator, before being elected to the Council in 2017, and that he continues to publish occasionally in The Bronx Chronicle. The Council member did not respond to a voicemail seeking comment.</p> <p>Just last week, on July 10, the first Council source said, Diaz Sr. sent out an email blast of a column that essentially read as an endorsement of Governor Cuomo and criticized his primary challenger, actor and activist Cynthia Nixon. The email was among those published as an op-ed in The Bronx Chronicle and was headlined, “The Christians Should Be Upset With Cuomo, Not The Gay Community.”</p> <p>In it, Diaz Sr. praised the governor’s efforts, along with former state Senator Tom Duane, to pass marriage equality in the state Senate. Cuomo “went out of his way” to bring Republican Senators on board, Diaz Sr. wrote. “Now, a member of the LGBTQ community and other leaders of the community are going all the way to kick Governor Cuomo out of the Governorship. After what he did, this is what he is getting in return? It is mind-boggling,” he added.</p> <p>Diaz Sr., who is a pastor, mentioned his own role in opposing the marriage equality bill. “I could understand gays getting angry at me, spending their money trying to get me out and launching all kinds of political diatribes against me. Because as a legislator, pastor and minister, I was the one opposing gay marriage. But attacking Governor Cuomo and going after him? I don’t understand that,” he wrote.</p> <p>A spokesperson for City Council Speaker Corey Johnson declined comment for this article. The most recent Council action on standards and ethics found a substantiated claim of sexual harassment against Bronx Council Member Andy King, whom the committee found had made repeated unwanted advances toward a Council aide. King was&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ny1.com/nyc/queens/politics/2018/02/13/nyc-council-committee-gives-councilman-andy-king-ethics-and-sensitivity-training" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ordered to undergo additional training</a>.</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, City government reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Ben Max contributed reporting.</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/27952025287_d781999108_z.jpg" alt="Ruben Diaz Sr. City Council " width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>CM Diaz Sr., standing (photo: John McCarten/City Council)</p> <hr /> <p>The New York City Council’s Committee on Standards and Ethics held a hearing on Monday concerning Bronx Council Member Ruben Diaz, Sr. and his alleged use of government email to send out political messages to colleagues and staffers across the Council, three knowledgeable sources told Gotham Gazette.</p> <p>The Standard and Ethics committee, chaired by Staten Island Council Member Steven Matteo, would not reveal the subject of Monday’s hearing and only noted on its agenda that the hearing was about Section 10.80 of the Council rules, which covers “disorderly behavior” including “willful violation or evasion of any provision of law relating to such Member’s discharge of his or her official duties; commission of fraud upon the City; conversion of public property to such Member’s own use; knowingly permitting or allowing by gross culpable conduct, any other person to convert public property; or violation of the Speaker’s policy or policies against discrimination and harassment.”</p> <p>The committee met Monday at City Hall and immediately went into closed session, emerging to divulge that it would indeed further investigate an allegation of impropriety, but without providing details as to the member, the subject matter at hand, or how it had come to the committee's attention.</p> <p>Members of the Council are bound by the city’s Conflicts of Interest law, contained in Chapter 68 of the City Charter, which prohibits city officials from using government time and resources for campaign-related purposes. According to one Council source who asked to remain anonymous to speak freely, Diaz Sr. has frequently sent out emails from his government account with his thoughts on issues he has worked on and those emails often crossed the line into political activity. A second Council source confirmed that the hearing was about Diaz Sr. and his emails, while a third said Diaz Sr. was the subject of the committee hearing, having to do with use of government resources for political purposes.</p> <p>The emails mirror Diaz Sr.’s “What You Should Know” dispatches that he sent out when he was a state Senator, before being elected to the Council in 2017, and that he continues to publish occasionally in The Bronx Chronicle. The Council member did not respond to a voicemail seeking comment.</p> <p>Just last week, on July 10, the first Council source said, Diaz Sr. sent out an email blast of a column that essentially read as an endorsement of Governor Cuomo and criticized his primary challenger, actor and activist Cynthia Nixon. The email was among those published as an op-ed in The Bronx Chronicle and was headlined, “The Christians Should Be Upset With Cuomo, Not The Gay Community.”</p> <p>In it, Diaz Sr. praised the governor’s efforts, along with former state Senator Tom Duane, to pass marriage equality in the state Senate. Cuomo “went out of his way” to bring Republican Senators on board, Diaz Sr. wrote. “Now, a member of the LGBTQ community and other leaders of the community are going all the way to kick Governor Cuomo out of the Governorship. After what he did, this is what he is getting in return? It is mind-boggling,” he added.</p> <p>Diaz Sr., who is a pastor, mentioned his own role in opposing the marriage equality bill. “I could understand gays getting angry at me, spending their money trying to get me out and launching all kinds of political diatribes against me. Because as a legislator, pastor and minister, I was the one opposing gay marriage. But attacking Governor Cuomo and going after him? I don’t understand that,” he wrote.</p> <p>A spokesperson for City Council Speaker Corey Johnson declined comment for this article. The most recent Council action on standards and ethics found a substantiated claim of sexual harassment against Bronx Council Member Andy King, whom the committee found had made repeated unwanted advances toward a Council aide. King was&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ny1.com/nyc/queens/politics/2018/02/13/nyc-council-committee-gives-councilman-andy-king-ethics-and-sensitivity-training" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ordered to undergo additional training</a>.</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, City government reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Ben Max contributed reporting.</p>
The Week Ahead in New York Politics, July 16 2018-07-15T04:00:00+00:00 2018-07-15T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7803:the-week-ahead-in-new-york-politics-july-16 Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" alt="New York City Hall" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>We’re less than two months from primary day, September 13, in the 2018 races for state-level seats. The entire state Legislature is on the ballot this fall, as well as the statewide offices of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Comptroller, and Attorney General. There are far more Democratic than Republican primaries given that the GOP has few, if any, sitting state legislators being challenged and the party ensured that its four statewide candidates would not be challenged. Republicans haven’t won a statewide election since Gov. George Pataki won his last term in 2002.</p> <p>On the Democratic side, there are intense, possibly damaging primaries happening in the races for Governor and Lieutenant Governor, where incumbents Andrew Cuomo and Kathy Hochul are being challenged by Cynthia Nixon and Jumaane Williams, respectively. The open Attorney General primary is a contentious four-way race. Comptroller Tom DiNapoli is not facing a primary challenger. And, there are spirited, intense campaigns being run against all eight state senators who made up what was the Independent Democratic Conference, six of whom represent parts of New York City.</p> <p>There are other intraparty fights happening, including three in Brooklyn where Julia Salazar is challenging Senator Martin Dilan, Blake Morris is challenging Senator Simcha Felder, a registered Democrat who has conferenced with Republicans, helping ensure them a slim majority, and the Ross Barkan-Andrew Gounardes primary to see who will try to unseat Senator Marty Golden. There are also a few Assembly primaries worth watching, though that chamber is less interesting in election season because of Democrats’ significant majority.</p> <p>So this week we’re watching candidate fundraising totals that are made public through Board of Election filings; to see if there are any new polls in the statewide races; for any news of whether Cuomo will accept a debate challenge from Nixon (he has said there would be a debate) and when there might be one or more Hochul-Williams or AG candidate debates (the AG candidates have been participating in candidate forums, but not debates as of yet), and how things progress in some of the aforementioned legislative primaries. Nixon's campaign got a boost this past week when additional Cuomo associates were convicted on federal corruption charges related to the governor's Buffalo Billion economic development program. It is the second trial this year involving Cuomo aides and donors to result in convictions.</p> <p>It’s not all elections, of course, as there is action this week at the City Council, a few panel events to be aware of, and more happening -- see our day-by-day rundown below. We're also watching for the announcement of a federal monitor to oversee the city's NYCHA consent decree, which could come as early as this week, and for any news of a possible special legislative session in Albany to address issues such as speed cameras around city schools and the Reproductive Health Act, which would codify Roe v. Wade abortion protections in New York law.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>e-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>Monday</strong><br />The New York State Board of Regents will meet on Monday and Tuesday.</p> <p>At 8:45 a.m. Monday, city schools Chancellor Richard Carranza will deliver remarks at the 21st Annual National Principals Leadership Institute, at Lincoln Center.</p> <p>On Monday at 11 a.m. in Brooklyn, "Lieutenant Governor candidate Jumaane Williams will announce his endorsement Julia Salazar, a progressive candidate running for New York State Senate today in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Salazar will also announce her support for Williams, and both will be endorsed by the Jewish Vote, a grassroots organization focused on organizing the people-powered wing of the Democratic Party."</p> <p>On Monday at 11:15 a.m. at City Hall, advocates and elected officials will rally to raise issues related to zoning and development of “megatoweres” on the Upper East and Upper West Sides, with a particular focus on a Tuesday hearing at the Board of Standards and Appeals related to two planned megatowers that are said to be exploiting zoning loopholes. “Join Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, State Senator Liz Krueger (rep.), and Council Member Ben Kallos, together with FRIENDS, Carnegie Hill Neighbors, Landmark West! and others in calling for a comprehensive solution now, not six months from now.”</p> <p>On Monday at 11:30 a.m. at Brooklyn Army Terminal, “New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) and City officials plan to unveil Freight NYC, an action plan that includes various strategies to modernize and strengthen the City’s freight distribution network. This plan is a major component of the City’s NY Works initiative to create 100,000 good-paying jobs by 2027.” The announcement will feature Deputy Mayor for Housing and Economic Development Alicia Glen; James Patchett, NYCEDC President and CEO; Congressional Reps. Jerrold Nadler and Nydia Velazquez; City Council Member Carlos Menchaca; Assistant Assembly Speaker Felix W. Ortiz; and others.</p> <p>At 1 p.m. Monday at City Hall, the City Council “Committee on Standards and Ethics will hold a meeting on a matter regarding section 10.80 of the Council Rules.” Section 10.80 relates to the code of conduct and “disorderly behavior,” which can include sexual harassment and using a government for office for political work -- there is no other information available at this time on what matter the committee may be dealing with or who may be involved.</p> <p>At 1 p.m. Monday outside City Hall, Republican gubernatorial candidate Marc Molinaro, with lieutenant governor candidate Julie Killian and City Council Member Joe Borelli,&nbsp;"will call on Governor Andrew Cuomo to keep his hands off New York tip wages."</p> <p>At 1 p.m. Monday outside Kings County Supreme Court, “Housing Rights Initiative (HRI) and Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams will announce a $10 million, 19-plaintiff lawsuit, filed by the Law Offices of Jack Lester in Kings County Supreme Court, based on a comprehensive investigation by HRI that has found that Kushner Companies appears to have employed a deliberate campaign to systematically harass rent-stabilized tenants in a 338-unit building out of their apartments using illegal, destructive, and dangerous construction practices. According to an independent lab analysis, families, including children and babies, were exposed to highly toxic and cancer-causing substances, including, but not limited to, the lung carcinogen crystalline silica and lead.”</p> <p>At 5 p.m. Monday, the City Council’s Charter Revision Commission will hold its first public meeting since its members were named, at the Council Chambers in City Hall. The commission, separate from the mayor’s ongoing charter revision commission, will work toward ballot proposals for November 2019.</p> <p>Mayor Bill de Blasio will make his weekly appearance on NY1’s Inside City Hall on Monday in the 7 and 11 p.m. hours.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday</strong><br /><a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/Calendar.aspx" target="_blank" rel="noopener">At the City Council</a> on Tuesday:<br />--The Subcommittee on Zoning and Franchises will meet at 9:30 a.m.<br />--The Committee on Criminal Justice will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss proposed laws relating to telephone services for inmates in city jails and prisons, and to “requiring the department of correction to report on use by department staff of any device capable of administering an electric shock.”<br />--The Committee on Consumer Affairs will meet at 10:30 a.m. to discuss proposed laws related to “disclosure of premium or compensation charged by bail bond agents” and to “requiring that bail bond agents make certain disclosures.”<br />--The Subcommittee on Landmarks, Public Siting, and Maritime Uses will meet at noon to discuss the landmarking proposal for the Coney Island Riegelmann Boardwalk.<br />--The Subcommittee on Planning, Dispositions, and Concessions will meet at 2 p.m.</p> <p>"On Tuesday, the First Lady Chirlane McCray will travel to Oakland, California to participate in the Well Being Legacy Convening." She will return on Friday.</p> <p>At 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, the Association for a Better New York <a href="http://abny.org/meetinginfo.php?id=87&amp;ts=1529952675" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> John Miller, the NYPD’s Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence and Counter-Terrorism, for a “Power Breakfast” at the Roosevelt Hotel in Midtown.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Tuesday, City &amp; State will host its “<a href="https://www.cityandstateny.com/events/protecting-new-york-summit" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Protecting New York Summit</a>” at Baruch College, discussing “New York’s security strategy from elections to community policing.” NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill and Roger Parrino, Commissioner of the State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services, will deliver keynote addresses. Other speakers will include Elizabeth Glazer, director of the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice; Michael Ryan, executive director of the New York City Board of Elections; State Senators Todd Kaminsky and Liz Krueger; Assemblymember David Buchwald; City Council Member Donovan Richards; and others. Gotham Gazette’s Ben Max will moderate a panel on election integrity at 11:15 a.m.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Tuesday, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, Comptroller Scott Stringer, and Public Advocate Letitia James will be among those to deliver remarks at a rally against hate at the Annual Amazon Web Summit, at Jacob K. Javits Convention Center.</p> <p>At 11:30 a.m., Stringer will host a press conference outside of City Hall Park. At 3 p.m., James will hold a press conference at her office at 1 Centre Street.&nbsp;At 11:30 a.m., Johnson will delivers remarks at Judith White Senior Center, and at 6 p.m. Johnson will deliver remarks at the LGBTQ Memorial Launch, at the LGBT Center.</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Tuesday, the State Senate Standing Committees on Labor and Economic Development will meet at the Dulles State Office Building in Watertown, Jefferson County, for a public hearing regarding the state’s MWBE program.</p> <p>At 11 a.m. Tuesday, the mayor’s Charter Revision Commission will hold a public meeting to discuss the “preliminary staff report” at the Pratt Institute’s Manhattan campus.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Tuesday, TransitCenter will host “<a href="http://transitcenter.org/events/access-delayed/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Access Delayed</a>” at One Whitehall Street, discussing how New York became the “least accessible subway system in the country” for people with disabilities, and strategies for remedying it. Panelists will include NYC Transit President Andy Byford, State Senator Michael Gianaris, Monica Bartley of the Center for Independence of the Disabled NY, and Emily Seelenfreund of Disability Rights Advocates. City Comptroller Scott Stringer will deliver opening remarks.</p> <p>On&nbsp;Tuesday at 6 p.m. at LaGuardia Community College, the "Department of Consumer Affairs’ (DCA) Office of Labor Policy &amp; Standards (OLPS), in partnership with the City Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) and the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs (MOIA), will hold a public hearing on the state of workers’ rights in New York City. “The State of Workers’ Rights in NYC: Advances and Setbacks in Turbulent Times” public hearing will include panels of workers who will testify on issues they face in today’s workplace, followed by an open session for testimony from low-wage and immigrant workers, advocacy groups, labor unions, nonprofits, and community-based organizations on topics including access to paid safe and sick leave, scheduling problems, freelancer payment issues, wage and hour, immigrant worksite enforcement issues and more. The hearing will inform DCA’s future efforts to protect workers, particularly low-wage and vulnerable workers." Participants will include Lorelei Salas, DCA Commissioner, Carmelyn Malalis, CCHR Commissioner, Bitta Mostofi, MOIA Commissioner, Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer, Council Member I. Daneek Miller, and "dozens of workers."</p> <p>The Working Families Party <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/440048339754838/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">is holding</a> its 20th anniversary gala on Tuesday evening in Brooklyn. The event will include the WFP's endorsed candidates for governor and lieutenant governor, Cynthia Nixon and Jumaane Williams, as well as other WFP candidates, supporters, and allies.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday</strong><br />The City Council will hold a stated meeting at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. There is expected to be the usual pre-stated press conference led by Speaker Corey Johnson at 12:30 p.m.</p> <p>Also at the City Council on Wednesday:<br />--The Committee on Land Use will meet at 9:30 a.m.<br />--The Committee on Housing and Buildings will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss a proposed law relating to “regulation of short-term residential rentals.”<br />--The Committee on Finance will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss the distribution of funds to organizations in the new city budget.</p> <p>Just ahead of the Council’s stated meeting, at 1 p.m. outside City Hall, “Council Members Antonio Reynoso and Steve Levin will join with advocates to rally for the passage of Intro 157, a bill to cap the amount of waste handled by overburdened communities.” Along with Reynoso, Levin, and other Council members, including those in the Progressive Caucus, participants will include Teamsters Joint Council 16, Teamsters Local 813, New York Lawyers for the Public Interest, New York City Environmental Justice Alliance, The Natural Resources Defense Council, and other community groups and environmental justice advocates.</p> <p>Wednesday from 5 to 6 p.m. will be the first weekly Max &amp; Murphy show on WBAI radio (listen at 99.FM or stream at <a href="https://www.wbai.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">WBAI.org</a>). Gotham Gazette’s Ben Max and City Limits’ Jarrett Murphy are moving their weekly podcast to the radio -- the show will still consist of interviews with newsmakers and analysts that will be made available as podcasts, and it will include listener calls! The first episode will include a conversation with Public Advocate Letitia James, who is running for Attorney General.</p> <p>At 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, the New York City Campaign Finance Board’s Voter Assistance Advisory Committee will hold a public meeting at the CFB’s headquarters at 100 Church Street.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Wednesday, Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver <a href="https://www.nycgovparks.org/events/2018/07/18/parks-without-borders-two-years-later-what-have-we-achieved" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will deliver</a> a two-year update on the “Parks Without Borders” initiative at the Museum of Natural History’s Kaufmann Theater.</p> <p><strong>Thursday</strong><br />At 8 a.m. Thursday, the Citizens Budget Commission will host New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood as a guest speaker at its annual trustee breakfast at the Harvard Club. The Attorney General will discuss “the U.S. Supreme Court nomination; the Attorney General's lawsuits to protect New Yorkers, such as on family separation, the 2020 Census, and more; and the ways in which New York State can lead to protect New Yorkers' rights.”</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Thursday, City &amp; State will unveil its <a href="https://www.cityandstateny.com/events/queens-power-50" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Queens Power 50</a>&nbsp;list at the Ravel Hotel in Long Island City. Queens Borough President Melinda Katz will speak.</p> <p><strong>Friday and the weekend</strong><br />There are no Friday or weekend events of note on our radar as of Sunday evening.</p> <p>***<br />Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Brachfeld and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@GothamGazette</a></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" alt="New York City Hall" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>We’re less than two months from primary day, September 13, in the 2018 races for state-level seats. The entire state Legislature is on the ballot this fall, as well as the statewide offices of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Comptroller, and Attorney General. There are far more Democratic than Republican primaries given that the GOP has few, if any, sitting state legislators being challenged and the party ensured that its four statewide candidates would not be challenged. Republicans haven’t won a statewide election since Gov. George Pataki won his last term in 2002.</p> <p>On the Democratic side, there are intense, possibly damaging primaries happening in the races for Governor and Lieutenant Governor, where incumbents Andrew Cuomo and Kathy Hochul are being challenged by Cynthia Nixon and Jumaane Williams, respectively. The open Attorney General primary is a contentious four-way race. Comptroller Tom DiNapoli is not facing a primary challenger. And, there are spirited, intense campaigns being run against all eight state senators who made up what was the Independent Democratic Conference, six of whom represent parts of New York City.</p> <p>There are other intraparty fights happening, including three in Brooklyn where Julia Salazar is challenging Senator Martin Dilan, Blake Morris is challenging Senator Simcha Felder, a registered Democrat who has conferenced with Republicans, helping ensure them a slim majority, and the Ross Barkan-Andrew Gounardes primary to see who will try to unseat Senator Marty Golden. There are also a few Assembly primaries worth watching, though that chamber is less interesting in election season because of Democrats’ significant majority.</p> <p>So this week we’re watching candidate fundraising totals that are made public through Board of Election filings; to see if there are any new polls in the statewide races; for any news of whether Cuomo will accept a debate challenge from Nixon (he has said there would be a debate) and when there might be one or more Hochul-Williams or AG candidate debates (the AG candidates have been participating in candidate forums, but not debates as of yet), and how things progress in some of the aforementioned legislative primaries. Nixon's campaign got a boost this past week when additional Cuomo associates were convicted on federal corruption charges related to the governor's Buffalo Billion economic development program. It is the second trial this year involving Cuomo aides and donors to result in convictions.</p> <p>It’s not all elections, of course, as there is action this week at the City Council, a few panel events to be aware of, and more happening -- see our day-by-day rundown below. We're also watching for the announcement of a federal monitor to oversee the city's NYCHA consent decree, which could come as early as this week, and for any news of a possible special legislative session in Albany to address issues such as speed cameras around city schools and the Reproductive Health Act, which would codify Roe v. Wade abortion protections in New York law.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>e-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>Monday</strong><br />The New York State Board of Regents will meet on Monday and Tuesday.</p> <p>At 8:45 a.m. Monday, city schools Chancellor Richard Carranza will deliver remarks at the 21st Annual National Principals Leadership Institute, at Lincoln Center.</p> <p>On Monday at 11 a.m. in Brooklyn, "Lieutenant Governor candidate Jumaane Williams will announce his endorsement Julia Salazar, a progressive candidate running for New York State Senate today in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Salazar will also announce her support for Williams, and both will be endorsed by the Jewish Vote, a grassroots organization focused on organizing the people-powered wing of the Democratic Party."</p> <p>On Monday at 11:15 a.m. at City Hall, advocates and elected officials will rally to raise issues related to zoning and development of “megatoweres” on the Upper East and Upper West Sides, with a particular focus on a Tuesday hearing at the Board of Standards and Appeals related to two planned megatowers that are said to be exploiting zoning loopholes. “Join Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, State Senator Liz Krueger (rep.), and Council Member Ben Kallos, together with FRIENDS, Carnegie Hill Neighbors, Landmark West! and others in calling for a comprehensive solution now, not six months from now.”</p> <p>On Monday at 11:30 a.m. at Brooklyn Army Terminal, “New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) and City officials plan to unveil Freight NYC, an action plan that includes various strategies to modernize and strengthen the City’s freight distribution network. This plan is a major component of the City’s NY Works initiative to create 100,000 good-paying jobs by 2027.” The announcement will feature Deputy Mayor for Housing and Economic Development Alicia Glen; James Patchett, NYCEDC President and CEO; Congressional Reps. Jerrold Nadler and Nydia Velazquez; City Council Member Carlos Menchaca; Assistant Assembly Speaker Felix W. Ortiz; and others.</p> <p>At 1 p.m. Monday at City Hall, the City Council “Committee on Standards and Ethics will hold a meeting on a matter regarding section 10.80 of the Council Rules.” Section 10.80 relates to the code of conduct and “disorderly behavior,” which can include sexual harassment and using a government for office for political work -- there is no other information available at this time on what matter the committee may be dealing with or who may be involved.</p> <p>At 1 p.m. Monday outside City Hall, Republican gubernatorial candidate Marc Molinaro, with lieutenant governor candidate Julie Killian and City Council Member Joe Borelli,&nbsp;"will call on Governor Andrew Cuomo to keep his hands off New York tip wages."</p> <p>At 1 p.m. Monday outside Kings County Supreme Court, “Housing Rights Initiative (HRI) and Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams will announce a $10 million, 19-plaintiff lawsuit, filed by the Law Offices of Jack Lester in Kings County Supreme Court, based on a comprehensive investigation by HRI that has found that Kushner Companies appears to have employed a deliberate campaign to systematically harass rent-stabilized tenants in a 338-unit building out of their apartments using illegal, destructive, and dangerous construction practices. According to an independent lab analysis, families, including children and babies, were exposed to highly toxic and cancer-causing substances, including, but not limited to, the lung carcinogen crystalline silica and lead.”</p> <p>At 5 p.m. Monday, the City Council’s Charter Revision Commission will hold its first public meeting since its members were named, at the Council Chambers in City Hall. The commission, separate from the mayor’s ongoing charter revision commission, will work toward ballot proposals for November 2019.</p> <p>Mayor Bill de Blasio will make his weekly appearance on NY1’s Inside City Hall on Monday in the 7 and 11 p.m. hours.</p> <p><strong>Tuesday</strong><br /><a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/Calendar.aspx" target="_blank" rel="noopener">At the City Council</a> on Tuesday:<br />--The Subcommittee on Zoning and Franchises will meet at 9:30 a.m.<br />--The Committee on Criminal Justice will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss proposed laws relating to telephone services for inmates in city jails and prisons, and to “requiring the department of correction to report on use by department staff of any device capable of administering an electric shock.”<br />--The Committee on Consumer Affairs will meet at 10:30 a.m. to discuss proposed laws related to “disclosure of premium or compensation charged by bail bond agents” and to “requiring that bail bond agents make certain disclosures.”<br />--The Subcommittee on Landmarks, Public Siting, and Maritime Uses will meet at noon to discuss the landmarking proposal for the Coney Island Riegelmann Boardwalk.<br />--The Subcommittee on Planning, Dispositions, and Concessions will meet at 2 p.m.</p> <p>"On Tuesday, the First Lady Chirlane McCray will travel to Oakland, California to participate in the Well Being Legacy Convening." She will return on Friday.</p> <p>At 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, the Association for a Better New York <a href="http://abny.org/meetinginfo.php?id=87&amp;ts=1529952675" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will host</a> John Miller, the NYPD’s Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence and Counter-Terrorism, for a “Power Breakfast” at the Roosevelt Hotel in Midtown.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Tuesday, City &amp; State will host its “<a href="https://www.cityandstateny.com/events/protecting-new-york-summit" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Protecting New York Summit</a>” at Baruch College, discussing “New York’s security strategy from elections to community policing.” NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill and Roger Parrino, Commissioner of the State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services, will deliver keynote addresses. Other speakers will include Elizabeth Glazer, director of the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice; Michael Ryan, executive director of the New York City Board of Elections; State Senators Todd Kaminsky and Liz Krueger; Assemblymember David Buchwald; City Council Member Donovan Richards; and others. Gotham Gazette’s Ben Max will moderate a panel on election integrity at 11:15 a.m.</p> <p>At 9 a.m. Tuesday, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, Comptroller Scott Stringer, and Public Advocate Letitia James will be among those to deliver remarks at a rally against hate at the Annual Amazon Web Summit, at Jacob K. Javits Convention Center.</p> <p>At 11:30 a.m., Stringer will host a press conference outside of City Hall Park. At 3 p.m., James will hold a press conference at her office at 1 Centre Street.&nbsp;At 11:30 a.m., Johnson will delivers remarks at Judith White Senior Center, and at 6 p.m. Johnson will deliver remarks at the LGBTQ Memorial Launch, at the LGBT Center.</p> <p>At 10 a.m. Tuesday, the State Senate Standing Committees on Labor and Economic Development will meet at the Dulles State Office Building in Watertown, Jefferson County, for a public hearing regarding the state’s MWBE program.</p> <p>At 11 a.m. Tuesday, the mayor’s Charter Revision Commission will hold a public meeting to discuss the “preliminary staff report” at the Pratt Institute’s Manhattan campus.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Tuesday, TransitCenter will host “<a href="http://transitcenter.org/events/access-delayed/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Access Delayed</a>” at One Whitehall Street, discussing how New York became the “least accessible subway system in the country” for people with disabilities, and strategies for remedying it. Panelists will include NYC Transit President Andy Byford, State Senator Michael Gianaris, Monica Bartley of the Center for Independence of the Disabled NY, and Emily Seelenfreund of Disability Rights Advocates. City Comptroller Scott Stringer will deliver opening remarks.</p> <p>On&nbsp;Tuesday at 6 p.m. at LaGuardia Community College, the "Department of Consumer Affairs’ (DCA) Office of Labor Policy &amp; Standards (OLPS), in partnership with the City Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) and the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs (MOIA), will hold a public hearing on the state of workers’ rights in New York City. “The State of Workers’ Rights in NYC: Advances and Setbacks in Turbulent Times” public hearing will include panels of workers who will testify on issues they face in today’s workplace, followed by an open session for testimony from low-wage and immigrant workers, advocacy groups, labor unions, nonprofits, and community-based organizations on topics including access to paid safe and sick leave, scheduling problems, freelancer payment issues, wage and hour, immigrant worksite enforcement issues and more. The hearing will inform DCA’s future efforts to protect workers, particularly low-wage and vulnerable workers." Participants will include Lorelei Salas, DCA Commissioner, Carmelyn Malalis, CCHR Commissioner, Bitta Mostofi, MOIA Commissioner, Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer, Council Member I. Daneek Miller, and "dozens of workers."</p> <p>The Working Families Party <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/440048339754838/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">is holding</a> its 20th anniversary gala on Tuesday evening in Brooklyn. The event will include the WFP's endorsed candidates for governor and lieutenant governor, Cynthia Nixon and Jumaane Williams, as well as other WFP candidates, supporters, and allies.</p> <p><strong>Wednesday</strong><br />The City Council will hold a stated meeting at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. There is expected to be the usual pre-stated press conference led by Speaker Corey Johnson at 12:30 p.m.</p> <p>Also at the City Council on Wednesday:<br />--The Committee on Land Use will meet at 9:30 a.m.<br />--The Committee on Housing and Buildings will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss a proposed law relating to “regulation of short-term residential rentals.”<br />--The Committee on Finance will meet at 10 a.m. to discuss the distribution of funds to organizations in the new city budget.</p> <p>Just ahead of the Council’s stated meeting, at 1 p.m. outside City Hall, “Council Members Antonio Reynoso and Steve Levin will join with advocates to rally for the passage of Intro 157, a bill to cap the amount of waste handled by overburdened communities.” Along with Reynoso, Levin, and other Council members, including those in the Progressive Caucus, participants will include Teamsters Joint Council 16, Teamsters Local 813, New York Lawyers for the Public Interest, New York City Environmental Justice Alliance, The Natural Resources Defense Council, and other community groups and environmental justice advocates.</p> <p>Wednesday from 5 to 6 p.m. will be the first weekly Max &amp; Murphy show on WBAI radio (listen at 99.FM or stream at <a href="https://www.wbai.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">WBAI.org</a>). Gotham Gazette’s Ben Max and City Limits’ Jarrett Murphy are moving their weekly podcast to the radio -- the show will still consist of interviews with newsmakers and analysts that will be made available as podcasts, and it will include listener calls! The first episode will include a conversation with Public Advocate Letitia James, who is running for Attorney General.</p> <p>At 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, the New York City Campaign Finance Board’s Voter Assistance Advisory Committee will hold a public meeting at the CFB’s headquarters at 100 Church Street.</p> <p>At 6 p.m. Wednesday, Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver <a href="https://www.nycgovparks.org/events/2018/07/18/parks-without-borders-two-years-later-what-have-we-achieved" target="_blank" rel="noopener">will deliver</a> a two-year update on the “Parks Without Borders” initiative at the Museum of Natural History’s Kaufmann Theater.</p> <p><strong>Thursday</strong><br />At 8 a.m. Thursday, the Citizens Budget Commission will host New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood as a guest speaker at its annual trustee breakfast at the Harvard Club. The Attorney General will discuss “the U.S. Supreme Court nomination; the Attorney General's lawsuits to protect New Yorkers, such as on family separation, the 2020 Census, and more; and the ways in which New York State can lead to protect New Yorkers' rights.”</p> <p>At 6:30 p.m. Thursday, City &amp; State will unveil its <a href="https://www.cityandstateny.com/events/queens-power-50" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Queens Power 50</a>&nbsp;list at the Ravel Hotel in Long Island City. Queens Borough President Melinda Katz will speak.</p> <p><strong>Friday and the weekend</strong><br />There are no Friday or weekend events of note on our radar as of Sunday evening.</p> <p>***<br />Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Brachfeld and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@GothamGazette</a></p>