Quantcast

Gotham Gazette

The Place for New York Policy and politics

 

City Planning

City Planning

  • mayorsofficesi

    (Photo: Spencer T Tucker/Mayor's office)


    The 2019 New York City Charter Revision Commission is deliberating whether to propose to voters in November that a requirement for a comprehensive city plan be added to the charter.

    Should New York City have a comprehensive, well-considered plan?
    Yes.

    A comprehensive, well considered, plan should be good for everyone. It would involve all of us in the creation and maintenance of a shared vision for our city and its neighborhoods. It would provide predictability for communities,

    ...
  • city council cmcarlos

    Council Member Menchaca and constituents (photo: John McCarten/City Council)


    In the past week, the New York Post and New York Daily News published editorials criticizing New York City Council Member Carlos Menchaca’s ...

  • 2conte

    Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette, and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits


    March 27, 2019 - Max & Murphy Podcast: Should the City Develop a Comprehensive Plan? with Elena Conte, Pratt Center Director of Policy

  • press conference

    (photo: Benjamin Kanter/Mayor's Office)


    The sixth 2019 Charter Revision Commission “expert” hearing ended in more confusion than it began with on the decidedly complex topics of land use and city planning.

    Over the course of more than three hours on Thursday evening, experts struggled to articulate a clear definition of comprehensive planning, leaving the commissioners feeling like they had little to work off moving

    ...
  • citycouncil r bay

    Speaker Johnson (photo: William Alatriste/City Council)


    New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson unveiled an ambitious proposal for municipal control of the city’s mass transit system on Tuesday at his first State of the City speech at LaGuardia Community College in Queens.

    “I am not here to be typical,” Johnson, who is considering a run for mayor in 2021, promised early on as he delivered a speech focused on nothing but transit, including a forceful push for replacing the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the state entity that controls the

    ...
  • metro region explorer3

    (photo via NYC Planning)


    New York City and its neighbors have a problem. Unlike Los Angeles, Chicago, and the other major U.S. metropolitan areas that fit neatly within the standard city, county, and state political boundaries, our metropolitan area of over 22 million people does not. We’re spread out over four states and 26 counties, five of which are called “boroughs” and were integrated together to create our city over 100 years ago.

    All these complex boundaries and jurisdictions have resulted in a metropolitan area that has been “divided and

    ...
  • lago cbc

    Marisa Lago (photo: Citizens Budget Commission)


    Urban planning wonks and other interested parties gathered Tuesday morning for a Citizens Budget Commission trustee breakfast featuring Marisa Lago, the director of the city’s Department of City Planning (DCP) and the chair of the City Planning Commission.

    At the event, Lago granted attendees a preview of DCP’s forthcoming “Geography of Jobs” report, due for release later this summer.

    “Geography of Jobs” is a product of the Department of City Planning’s first foray into regionalism, led by DCP’s relatively ...

  • nyc metro region map via dcp

    The NYC Metro Area (image via DCP presentation)


    New York City has seen rapid post-recession population and job growth, while housing development has not kept pace, and while areas in the metropolitan area surrounding the city have also seen growth, it has been at a slower pace than the city’s. Still, there are 1 million commuters into the city who account for 28 percent of the city labor force, and as job opportunities in the five boroughs continue to grow, housing options in the areas just outside the city are troublingly stagnant.

    ...
  • De Blasio city planning

    Mayor de Blasio (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayor's Office)


    New York City is the only major city in the country that has never had a comprehensive development plan, according to Tom Angotti, professor of urban policy at Hunter College.

    Facing major, city-wide challenges now and into the coming decades, the city’s approach to development and planning is byzantine, narrow, and somewhat haphazard. The vast, diverse city of 8.5 million residents and millions more visitors every day is often looked at by neighborhood, legislative district,

    ...