Gotham Gazette Gotham Gazette is an online publication covering New York policy and politics as well as news on public safety, transportation, education, finance and more. http://www.gothamgazette.com/component/tags/tag/committee-on-sanitation-and-solid-waste-management 2018-07-22T06:29:59+00:00 Webmaster webmaster@gothamgazette.com Council Sanitation Chair Says Mayor Must Get ‘Bold’ on Waste Management 2018-06-11T04:00:00+00:00 2018-06-11T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7729:council-sanitation-chair-says-mayor-must-get-bold-on-waste-management Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/reynoso-ready-nyc.jpg" alt="reynoso ready nyc" width="600" height="344" /></p> <p>Council Member Reynoso, middle (photo: @JoeEspoNYC)</p> <hr /> <p>“Trash — it’s not sexy,” said City Council Member Antonio Reynoso. “It’s the hardest thing to get people to care about and it’s also something that’s out of sight and out of mind because it gets picked up -- for the most part, the Department of Sanitation does a great job.”</p> <p>But there’s a lot about trash -- waste management, really -- to discuss, and Reynoso is at the forefront of the conversations as chair of the City Council’s sanitation committee, a position he has held for more than four years, continuing in the post into a second and final term.</p> <p>Reynoso discussed major waste management issues facing New York City during <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7701-what-s-the-data-point-1-988-with-antonio-reynoso" target="_blank" rel="noopener">a recent appearance on the What’s The [Data] Point? podcast</a> from Gotham Gazette and Citizens Budget Commission, touching on regulating the private caring industry, which is the source of a great deal of controversy; changing the waste-hauling zones in the city to reduce pollution and increase efficiency; mandating more recycling from New Yorkers, such as of solid food waste, also known as composting; and more.</p> <p>Reynoso, who represents a district that includes Williamsburg, Bushwick, and Ridgewood, crossing from Brooklyn into Queens, and a lot of the city’s manufacturing space. Many of his constituents rely on the L train, and Reynoso touched upon the line’s looming closure.</p> <p>Born in Williamsburg to immigrant parents, Reynoso was the chief of staff for City Council Member Diana Reyna before he ran for the Council in 2013 and defeated former Assemblymember Vito Lopez in the Democratic Party.</p> <p>“Scandal hit [Lopez] very hard,” <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7701-what-s-the-data-point-1-988-with-antonio-reynoso" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reynoso said on the podcast</a>, referring to the fact that Lopez had been forced from the Assembly over a sexual harassment scandal. “He tried to run and I went against him, people still bet on me to lose. I didn’t get all the endorsements, surprisingly, but I won. I was very fortunate, my community had my back, I had people around me, and it was a very joyous moment for me.”</p> <p>Reynoso easily won the general election in a heavily Democratic district and cruised to reelection in 2017. Throughout his time in the Council, he has chaired the sanitation committee and had oversight of key agencies related to trash, snow, and more.</p> <p>In New York, every commercial establishment that will not heave its own trash is obliged by law to have its waste removed by a private carter licensed by the Business Integrity Commission. There are more than 200 carters licensed by the BIC that can lawfully gather trash from commercial establishments in the city.</p> <p>However, many of these carters have bad safety records and recent journalism, largely by ProPublica, has exposed the rogue and dangerous world of private carting. Reynoso said the BIC, which was originally an anti-organized crime unit, is failing to regulate the city’s private waste industry, even after two deaths involving Sanitation Salvage, a private carter, in the last six months.</p> <p>“They were put in to weed out organized crime and they’ve done a great job at doing that, but they also have other responsibilities and one of those responsibilities is regulating this industry relating to safety as well,” Reynoso said of BIC. “They’ve never done that.”</p> <p>Not only is better safety regulation of private carters essential, Reynoso said, but the city must also return to a zoned system for collections, where a small number of companies wins contracts for certain geographic areas.</p> <p>“It’s funny, they had a zone system when they had organized crime because they knew it was more efficient and they knew it was more profitable — you can’t make this stuff up,” Reynoso said. “The only problem is that their zoning was corrupt. We would be doing it in a way that’s fair.”</p> <p>A plan is expected soon from the de Blasio administration with proposed zones and other regulations.</p> <p>Reynoso discussed the importance of requiring what he called “mandatory organics recycling.” This would involve adding organics to the list of required recyclables that already includes metal, glass, plastic, and paper.</p> <p>“It’s eggshells, it’s food, all that stuff you throw away,” Reynoso said. “Once you seperate it, you’ll notice that maybe 5% of your trash is not organics or recycling and that would help considerably.”</p> <p>For this directive to work it must be compulsory, not voluntary, Reynoso said.</p> <p>“We have to mandate that,” Reynoso said. “We can’t tell people ‘We’re going to let you volunteer or it’s a choice.’ We don’t work with choice. Unfortunately in the city of New York, you have to tell us what to do or we won’t do it.”</p> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7701-what-s-the-data-point-1-988-with-antonio-reynoso" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Throughout the podcast</a>, Reynoso repeatedly emphasized the word “bold” in discussing the need for the city to pursue and see real change.</p> <p>“To be honest, being bold is the thing that we lack here in New York City when it comes to trash,” Reynoso said. “Almost everywhere else, whether it’s immigration, housing or education, people are trying to do something. A community school here, a sanctuary city there, there’s an attempt at something bold to change the landscape of what we consider a crisis, but not sanitation.”</p> <p>He called on Mayor de Blasio to take the lead.</p> <p>“Being bold — having someone like a mayor that would be able to say ‘We’re going to do this, this is what’s going to happen, it’s my last four years, it’s good for the future of the City of New York so I’m going to stand up and do it.’” Reynoso said. “If we don’t see that, we’re going to have trouble and it’s not going to change.”</p> <p>Beyond trash and sanitation, Reynoso was briefly asked about the upcoming L train shutdown, which will begin in 2019 and force hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who use the subway line to go between Manhattan and Brooklyn every day to find alternate routes.</p> <p>In 2012, Hurricane Sandy flooded the Canarsie Tunnel under the East River with gallons of salt water, which caused critical destruction. The MTA has released a wide-ranging plan to alleviate the consequences of the eventual stoppage, including a busway and bikeway in Manhattan and increased subway service throughout the city on other lines. A number of details still need to be worked out, some of which rely on the city’s Department of Transportation.</p> <p>Reynoso said an audacious effort by DOT is required for city transportation to run smoothly following the shutdown.</p> <p>“We’re going to have a hard time here,” Reynoso said. “We’ll see the crisis in the first three weeks and DOT has to be very flexible to be able to fix it…I want them to be bold.”</p> <p>He said the DOT has not planned enough change on the Williamsburg Bridge for a smooth transition. He is calling for an exclusive bus lane that runs 24/7 and the importance of shutting down streets for pedestrians, buses, and bikes.</p> <p>“We really need to start looking at how to move around the city of New York outside of vehicles. DOT has a perfect chance to prove that they can do it here…you have an opportunity, there’s a crisis, take advantage of it.”</p> <p style="text-align: center;">[Listen: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7701-what-s-the-data-point-1-988-with-antonio-reynoso" target="_blank" rel="noopener">What's The [Data] Point? 1,988, with Antonio Reynoso</a>]</p> <p>

***
by Jordan Kimmel, Gotham Gazette
@GothamGazette

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/reynoso-ready-nyc.jpg" alt="reynoso ready nyc" width="600" height="344" /></p> <p>Council Member Reynoso, middle (photo: @JoeEspoNYC)</p> <hr /> <p>“Trash — it’s not sexy,” said City Council Member Antonio Reynoso. “It’s the hardest thing to get people to care about and it’s also something that’s out of sight and out of mind because it gets picked up -- for the most part, the Department of Sanitation does a great job.”</p> <p>But there’s a lot about trash -- waste management, really -- to discuss, and Reynoso is at the forefront of the conversations as chair of the City Council’s sanitation committee, a position he has held for more than four years, continuing in the post into a second and final term.</p> <p>Reynoso discussed major waste management issues facing New York City during <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7701-what-s-the-data-point-1-988-with-antonio-reynoso" target="_blank" rel="noopener">a recent appearance on the What’s The [Data] Point? podcast</a> from Gotham Gazette and Citizens Budget Commission, touching on regulating the private caring industry, which is the source of a great deal of controversy; changing the waste-hauling zones in the city to reduce pollution and increase efficiency; mandating more recycling from New Yorkers, such as of solid food waste, also known as composting; and more.</p> <p>Reynoso, who represents a district that includes Williamsburg, Bushwick, and Ridgewood, crossing from Brooklyn into Queens, and a lot of the city’s manufacturing space. Many of his constituents rely on the L train, and Reynoso touched upon the line’s looming closure.</p> <p>Born in Williamsburg to immigrant parents, Reynoso was the chief of staff for City Council Member Diana Reyna before he ran for the Council in 2013 and defeated former Assemblymember Vito Lopez in the Democratic Party.</p> <p>“Scandal hit [Lopez] very hard,” <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7701-what-s-the-data-point-1-988-with-antonio-reynoso" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reynoso said on the podcast</a>, referring to the fact that Lopez had been forced from the Assembly over a sexual harassment scandal. “He tried to run and I went against him, people still bet on me to lose. I didn’t get all the endorsements, surprisingly, but I won. I was very fortunate, my community had my back, I had people around me, and it was a very joyous moment for me.”</p> <p>Reynoso easily won the general election in a heavily Democratic district and cruised to reelection in 2017. Throughout his time in the Council, he has chaired the sanitation committee and had oversight of key agencies related to trash, snow, and more.</p> <p>In New York, every commercial establishment that will not heave its own trash is obliged by law to have its waste removed by a private carter licensed by the Business Integrity Commission. There are more than 200 carters licensed by the BIC that can lawfully gather trash from commercial establishments in the city.</p> <p>However, many of these carters have bad safety records and recent journalism, largely by ProPublica, has exposed the rogue and dangerous world of private carting. Reynoso said the BIC, which was originally an anti-organized crime unit, is failing to regulate the city’s private waste industry, even after two deaths involving Sanitation Salvage, a private carter, in the last six months.</p> <p>“They were put in to weed out organized crime and they’ve done a great job at doing that, but they also have other responsibilities and one of those responsibilities is regulating this industry relating to safety as well,” Reynoso said of BIC. “They’ve never done that.”</p> <p>Not only is better safety regulation of private carters essential, Reynoso said, but the city must also return to a zoned system for collections, where a small number of companies wins contracts for certain geographic areas.</p> <p>“It’s funny, they had a zone system when they had organized crime because they knew it was more efficient and they knew it was more profitable — you can’t make this stuff up,” Reynoso said. “The only problem is that their zoning was corrupt. We would be doing it in a way that’s fair.”</p> <p>A plan is expected soon from the de Blasio administration with proposed zones and other regulations.</p> <p>Reynoso discussed the importance of requiring what he called “mandatory organics recycling.” This would involve adding organics to the list of required recyclables that already includes metal, glass, plastic, and paper.</p> <p>“It’s eggshells, it’s food, all that stuff you throw away,” Reynoso said. “Once you seperate it, you’ll notice that maybe 5% of your trash is not organics or recycling and that would help considerably.”</p> <p>For this directive to work it must be compulsory, not voluntary, Reynoso said.</p> <p>“We have to mandate that,” Reynoso said. “We can’t tell people ‘We’re going to let you volunteer or it’s a choice.’ We don’t work with choice. Unfortunately in the city of New York, you have to tell us what to do or we won’t do it.”</p> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7701-what-s-the-data-point-1-988-with-antonio-reynoso" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Throughout the podcast</a>, Reynoso repeatedly emphasized the word “bold” in discussing the need for the city to pursue and see real change.</p> <p>“To be honest, being bold is the thing that we lack here in New York City when it comes to trash,” Reynoso said. “Almost everywhere else, whether it’s immigration, housing or education, people are trying to do something. A community school here, a sanctuary city there, there’s an attempt at something bold to change the landscape of what we consider a crisis, but not sanitation.”</p> <p>He called on Mayor de Blasio to take the lead.</p> <p>“Being bold — having someone like a mayor that would be able to say ‘We’re going to do this, this is what’s going to happen, it’s my last four years, it’s good for the future of the City of New York so I’m going to stand up and do it.’” Reynoso said. “If we don’t see that, we’re going to have trouble and it’s not going to change.”</p> <p>Beyond trash and sanitation, Reynoso was briefly asked about the upcoming L train shutdown, which will begin in 2019 and force hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who use the subway line to go between Manhattan and Brooklyn every day to find alternate routes.</p> <p>In 2012, Hurricane Sandy flooded the Canarsie Tunnel under the East River with gallons of salt water, which caused critical destruction. The MTA has released a wide-ranging plan to alleviate the consequences of the eventual stoppage, including a busway and bikeway in Manhattan and increased subway service throughout the city on other lines. A number of details still need to be worked out, some of which rely on the city’s Department of Transportation.</p> <p>Reynoso said an audacious effort by DOT is required for city transportation to run smoothly following the shutdown.</p> <p>“We’re going to have a hard time here,” Reynoso said. “We’ll see the crisis in the first three weeks and DOT has to be very flexible to be able to fix it…I want them to be bold.”</p> <p>He said the DOT has not planned enough change on the Williamsburg Bridge for a smooth transition. He is calling for an exclusive bus lane that runs 24/7 and the importance of shutting down streets for pedestrians, buses, and bikes.</p> <p>“We really need to start looking at how to move around the city of New York outside of vehicles. DOT has a perfect chance to prove that they can do it here…you have an opportunity, there’s a crisis, take advantage of it.”</p> <p style="text-align: center;">[Listen: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7701-what-s-the-data-point-1-988-with-antonio-reynoso" target="_blank" rel="noopener">What's The [Data] Point? 1,988, with Antonio Reynoso</a>]</p> <p>

***
by Jordan Kimmel, Gotham Gazette
@GothamGazette

Read more by this writer.

</p>
What's The [Data] Point? 1,988, with Antonio Reynoso 2018-05-31T04:00:00+00:00 2018-05-31T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=7701:what-s-the-data-point-1-988-with-antonio-reynoso Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/whats-the-data-point.jpg" alt="whats the data point" width="600" height="600" /></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What's The [Data] Point? Episode 42</strong><strong> -- 1,988,&nbsp;with Antonio Reynoso [You can download What's The [Data] Point? wherever you get your podcasts, including on iTunes]</strong></p> <!--<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/wtdp-w-cbrecher-120.jpg" alt="wtdp w cbrecher 120" width="440" height="120" style="display: block; margin: 10px auto;" /></p>--> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/antonio-reynoso-wtdp.jpg" alt="antonio reynoso" width="277" height="143" style="margin-right: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p>1,988 pounds -- almost one ton! -- is the average amount of garbage a New York City household throws out each year, according to a recent study by the City Department of Sanitation. Citywide Sanitation disposed of 3.2 million tons in 2017, and that does not include commercial waste.</p> <p>City Council Member Antonio Reynoso of Brooklyn, chair of the Council's sanitation committee, joined the podcast to discuss what he believes are essential steps the city must take regarding waste management, both regarding the public sector and private sector, including elements related to recycling requirements, new routes, and more. Reynoso discusses how he got elected to the Council in 2013, why he wanted to chair the sanitation committee, how he approaches waste management with an equity lens, and more, including measures he believes should be taken during the looming L-train shutdown.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think: Ben Max of GG (<a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax</a>), Maria Doulis of CBC (<a href="https://twitter.com/MariaDoulis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@MariaDoulis</a>). Listen below or download wherever you get your podcasts!</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/451831104&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="170" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/whats-the-data-point.jpg" alt="whats the data point" width="600" height="600" /></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What's The [Data] Point? Episode 42</strong><strong> -- 1,988,&nbsp;with Antonio Reynoso [You can download What's The [Data] Point? wherever you get your podcasts, including on iTunes]</strong></p> <!--<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/wtdp-w-cbrecher-120.jpg" alt="wtdp w cbrecher 120" width="440" height="120" style="display: block; margin: 10px auto;" /></p>--> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/antonio-reynoso-wtdp.jpg" alt="antonio reynoso" width="277" height="143" style="margin-right: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p>1,988 pounds -- almost one ton! -- is the average amount of garbage a New York City household throws out each year, according to a recent study by the City Department of Sanitation. Citywide Sanitation disposed of 3.2 million tons in 2017, and that does not include commercial waste.</p> <p>City Council Member Antonio Reynoso of Brooklyn, chair of the Council's sanitation committee, joined the podcast to discuss what he believes are essential steps the city must take regarding waste management, both regarding the public sector and private sector, including elements related to recycling requirements, new routes, and more. Reynoso discusses how he got elected to the Council in 2013, why he wanted to chair the sanitation committee, how he approaches waste management with an equity lens, and more, including measures he believes should be taken during the looming L-train shutdown.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think: Ben Max of GG (<a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax</a>), Maria Doulis of CBC (<a href="https://twitter.com/MariaDoulis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@MariaDoulis</a>). Listen below or download wherever you get your podcasts!</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/451831104&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="170" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
The Week Ahead in New York Politics, November 9 2015-11-08T05:00:00+00:00 2015-11-08T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=5975:the-week-ahead-in-new-york-politics-november-9 Super User <p><img alt="New York City Hall" src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>Wednesday is Veterans Day, with parades, resource fairs, and events to honor and aid veterans taking place before, on, and after the day itself. Mayor Bill de Blasio will hold a breakfast reception to honor the military veterans Wednesday morning. On Thursday, the City Council will hold a hearing on veteran homelessness, which the mayor vowed to end by the end of this year as part of a national pledge.</p> <p>The mayor and the City Council agreed last week to create a new Department of Veterans Services, removing the agency from the Mayor's Office and making veterans affairs its own city department, which will give it more resources and Council oversight. There will be a celebratory rally outside of City Hall on Tuesday at 11 a.m., then the veterans affairs committee of the Council will vote through the department bill, followed by the full Council.</p> <p>Could this be the week that First Lady Chirlane McCray unveils her much-anticipated "Mental Health Roadmap"? The week of Veterans Day would make sense considering the mental health challenges many veterans face. There's been no indication this is the week, but the 'roadmap' has been slated for release this fall. [Read <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5877-mccray-set-to-unveil-mental-health-roadmap-signature-de-blasio-plan" target="_blank">our extensive preview of McCray's mental health roadmap</a>]</p> <p>According to Citizens Budget Commission (CBC), the City will release its first quarter modification to the FY2016 budget this week. "In advance of that release, CBC <a href="http://www.cbcny.org/sites/default/files/PRESENTATION_11062015.pdf" target="_blank">compares</a> the Mayor's budget savings agenda, called the Citywide Savings Program, or CSP, with the Program to Eliminate the Gap (PEG) in fiscal years 2010 to 2015."</p> <p>After a marathon Friday press conference at which de Blasio answered dozens of questions from assembled reporters on a wide variety of subjects, the mayor had a quiet weekend. De Blasio continues to be scrutinized for his approach to the media, his administration's transparency, and several policy areas in which he is having the most challenges, such as homelessness, policing, and education. We'll see what this week holds other than a focus on veterans and the budget. On Monday morning the mayor is set to meet with members of the city's congressional delegation and then hold a media availability - at which he'll take both on- and off-topic questions.</p> <p>As always, there's a great deal happening&nbsp;all over the city, with many events to be aware of - read our day-by-day rundown below.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>E-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>MONDAY<br /></strong>At the <a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/Calendar.aspx" target="_blank">City Council</a> on Monday:</p> <ul> <li>At 10:30 a.m. the Subcommittee on Planning, Dispositions and Concessions will convene to discuss several Land Use Applications in Brooklyn.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 11 a.m. the Committee on Land Use will meet.</li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">On Monday at 10 a.m.,&nbsp;Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams "will honor Brooklyn's military heroes at his "Start Strong, Finish Strong" resource fair for veterans...Additional speakers will include Mayor's Office of Veterans Affairs Commissioner Loree K. Sutton, a retired Army brigadier general, and USAG Fort Hamilton Command Sergeant Kevin Fauntleroy. Borough President Adams will speak about Brooklyn's commitment to its veterans, including his efforts to restore the Brooklyn War Memorial and to address mental health challenges facing the community."</p> <p dir="ltr">On Monday at 11 a.m., New York City Council Member Carlos Menchaca, along with Hetrick-Martin Institute CEO Thomas Krever and the LGBTQ Caucus of the City Council will unveil “HMI Goes Citywide For LGBTQ Youth,” a new initiative to address the challenges LGBTQ youth face in New York.</p> <p dir="ltr">"On Monday, Mayor de Blasio will meet with members of the New York Congressional Delegation at City Hall to discuss a number‎ of issues impacting New York City. This meeting is closed press.&nbsp;After, [at 11:30 a.m.] the Mayor and members of the Congressional Delegation will hold a media availability on the Zadroga Act on the steps of City Hall," according to his public schedule.</p> <p dir="ltr">At noon Monday, Crain’s New York Business will host its “<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/#utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=cnyb-events&amp;utm_campaign=cnyb-events-20151015" target="_blank">Crain’s Business Hall of Fame Luncheon</a>” to celebrate businesspeople who have transformed the city through their philanthropic and professional lives. The list of honorees include Ms. Pamela Brier, President and Chief Executive Officer, Maimonides Medical Center; Mr.Laurence Fink, Chairman and CEO, BlackRock; Ms. Shelly Lazarus, Chairman Emeritus, Ogilvy &amp; Mather; Mr. Alan Patricof, Managing Director Greycroft; The Honorable Richard Ravitch, Former Lieutenant Governor, New York; Ms. Emily Rafferty, President Emeritus, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; and Mr. Steven Roth, Chairman and CEO, Vornado Realty Trust. EisnerAmper will sponsor the event.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 12:30 p.m. on Monday, Public Advocate Letitia James will “announce measures to expand affordability of NYC child care.” Joined by parents, advocates and other stakeholders, James will hold a press conference about the costs and accessibility of child care in New York City, releasing a report and outlining five policies to help increase accessibility, capacity, and affordability.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 1 p.m. Monday at City Hal, the correction officers union will hold a press conference&nbsp;"following the vicious attack on a correction officer by two Rikers inmates."</p> <p dir="ltr">At 6 p.m. Monday, schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña will deliver remarks at a pre-K family forum at the Children's Museum of Manhattan.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 7 p.m. Monday, Comptroller Scott Stringer and Assembly Member Linda Rosenthal will co-host a town hall meeting at the Lincoln Square Neighborhood Center on West 65th Street.</p> <p dir="ltr">Also at 7 p.m. Monday, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer will speak at New York Historical Society’s “Debt of Honor” program.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>TUESDAY</strong><br />Tuesday is a “Fight for $15” day of action, with many events planned to bring attention to wage issues and push for a $15 per hour minimum wage. Unions, advocacy groups, elected officials, and others will participate. Worker strikes, rallies, and marches will take place throughout the day all over the city and the country.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 6:30 a.m., Mayor de Blasio&nbsp;"will deliver remarks at a Fight for $15 rally to raise the minimum wage...Immediately following his remarks, the Mayor will appear in several one-on-one interviews with local television networks to discuss the need to raise the minimum wage." At 2:15 p.m., the Mayor will appear live on WBLS 107.5 and at 2:30 p.m., on NY1. "In the evening, the Mayor will attend the 70th Annual Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner."</p> <p dir="ltr">State Senate Republicans will convene in Albany on Tuesday to discuss their 2016 agenda. (A week later Assembly Democrats will meet in the capital,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/albany/2015/11/8581887/assembly-democrats-plan-nov-17-return-albany" target="_blank">according to Politico New York</a>.)</p> <p dir="ltr">On Tuesday at 8 a.m., Chancellor of the State University of of New York Nancy Zimpher will speak at the Citizens Budget Commission breakfast at the Harvard Club. Zimpher will discuss SUNY projects and priorities.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 9 a.m. Tuesday the Board of Corrections will hold a meeting.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 11 a.m. Tuesday at City Hall, Council Speaker Mark-Viverito, Council Member Eric Ulrich, who chairs the Council’s veterans affairs committee, military veterans, and advocates will celebrate the imminent creation of a new City Department of Veterans Services.</p> <p dir="ltr">At the <a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/Calendar.aspx" target="_blank">City Council</a> on Tuesday, the City Council will convene for a full-body Stated Meeting, which, as always, will be prefaced by a press conference hosted by City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito at 12:30 p.m.</p> <p dir="ltr">Gov. Cuomo will make an announcement Tuesday at 4:15 p.m. in Manhattan at Foley Square, likely at a Fight for $15 event.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 6:30 p.m. the Committee on Drugs and Law of the New York City Bar Association will host a <a href="https://services.nycbar.org/iMIS/Events/Event_Display.aspx?EventKey=DRU111015&amp;WebsiteKey=f71e12f3-524e-4f8c-a5f7-0d16ce7b3314" target="_blank">discussion</a> on marijuana policy in New York. Panelists will include City Council Member Rafael Espinal, state Senator Jeff Klein, Vocal New York’s Alyssa Aguilera, and others.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 7 p.m. Tuesday, “Trans-Pacific Partnership: Who Wins and Who Loses in This Secret Deal?”, a panel event presented by the Big Apple Coffee Party and moderated by Zephyr Teachout, Fordham law professor and CEO of Mayday PAC.</p> <p dir="ltr">The only City Council Participatory Budgeting <a href="http://council.nyc.gov/html/pb/events.shtml" target="_blank">event</a> of the week is on Tuesday: Council Member David Greenfield (District 44, Brooklyn), 6:30 p.m.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>WEDNESDAY</strong><br />Wednesday is Veterans Day. At 8 a.m. Mayor de Blasio will hold a breakfast reception to honor and remember military veterans.</p> <p dir="ltr">On Wednesday evening, many New York politicos, policy wonks, and others will gather to celebrate the 25th anniversary of City Journal, the Manhattan Institute policy publication.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>THURSDAY</strong><br />On Thursday at 8 a.m. Association for Better New York will host a <a href="https://www.abny.org/Content/Events/EventTickets.aspx?EventID=182&amp;utm_source=ABNY+Event+Invitations+-+Non-members&amp;utm_campaign=ebc8e0c451-ABNY_Nonmembers_Breakfast_Carolyn_Maloney_Round3&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_term=0_e4e1abe544-ebc8e0c451-381180997" target="_blank">breakfast</a> with Congressional Rep. Carolyn Maloney, who will speak about the &nbsp;projects, as well as her other priorities.</p> <p dir="ltr">The next public meeting of the New York City Campaign Finance Board will be Thursday at 10 a.m.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz will hold a <a href="http://queensbp.org/event/queens-borough-presidents-land-use-hearing-2-2-2-2-3-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2/?instance_id=1352" target="_blank">Public Land Use Hearing</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Politico New York hosts <a href="http://www.politico.com/events/2015/11/new-york-playbook-215348" target="_blank">New York Playbook</a> Lunch, a discussion with Rep. Hakeem Jeffries and Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, hosted by playbook writers Azi Paybarah, Jimmy Vielkind, and Mike Allen.</p> <p dir="ltr">At the <a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/Calendar.aspx" target="_blank">City Council</a> on Thursday:</p> <ul> <li dir="ltr">At 10 a.m. the Committee on Transportation will meet for an oversight hearing on transportation deserts. The Committee will hear two bills: one to mandate a DOT study looking at the feasibility of a light rail system; another to mandate a study on transportation deserts. It will also look at resolutions calling on the MTA to allow commuters to pay the metrocard fare on commuter rails and to conduct a study on unused railroad rights.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 10 a.m. the Committee on Parks and Recreation will meet to hear CM Mark Levine’s bill that would create a taskforce to study the effects of building shadows on parks.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 10 a.m. the Committee on Aging will meet for oversight on DFTA’s home care program.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 10 a.m. the Committee on Housing and Buildings will meet to discuss a bill that would require residential buildings to have photoelectric smoke detectors.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 1 p.m. the Committee on Environmental Protection will meet to discuss two bills aimed at reducing noise by sightseeing helicopters.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 1 p.m. the Committee on Sanitation and Solid Waste Management will convene for oversight of DSNY’s 2016 snow plan, and the introduction of two bills that would identify pedestrian bridges and create plans for de-snowing and de-icing them and make exemptions for senior citizens and persons with disabilities from being penalized for failing to remove snow from on sidewalks.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 1:30 p.m. the Committee on Veterans, jointly with the Committee on General Welfare will meet for oversight of the City’s efforts to end homelessness among military veterans.</li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">Thursday at 5:30 p.m. at New York Law School: <a href="https://nyls.wufoo.com/forms/impact-thursday-2/" target="_blank">Law and the Lives of Young Black Men,</a>&nbsp;"featuring&nbsp;Richard Buery, Deputy Mayor for Strategic Policy Initiatives; Alphonso B. David, Counsel to the Governor; and Nicholas Turner, President and Director, Vera Institute of Justice. Moderated by Professor Mercer Givhan, New York Law School."</p> <p dir="ltr">Thursday evening, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries is holding a campaign fundraiser, a <a href="https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/hjcuomo" target="_blank">reception</a> with Gov. Andrew Cuomo as the honorary guest.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 6 p.m. Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. and the Bronx Borough Board will host a public hearing regarding the Zoning for Quality and Affordability and the Mandatory Inclusionary Housing proposals of Mayor de Blasio through the City Planning department and toward his housing plan.</p> <p dir="ltr">Mayor de Blasio will host a town hall meeting focused on education in Jackson Heights, Queens, Thursday evening. Council Member Daniel Dromm, who chairs the City Council education committee, will welcome de Blasio and his team to the district.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 7:30 p.m. Thursday, the New York City Department of Records and Information Services and WomensActivism.NYC will host the <a href="https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pe.c/10039568" target="_blank">celebration</a> of the 200th o birthday of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Women's Suffrage Centennial. Sponsored by the City of New York, the Mayor’s Fund to Advance NYC, The Cooper Union, and Lebenthal Asset Management, the event is expected to be attended by elected officials including Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer.</p> <p><strong>FRIDAY</strong><br />On Friday at 8:15 a.m. Vicki Been, the Commissioner for Housing Preservation and Development, will <a href="https://nyls.wufoo.com/forms/vicki-been-citylaw-breakfast/" target="_blank">speak </a>at the latest New York City Law School CityLaw breakfast event.</p> <p>On Saturday: "Newly appointed New York State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia will give her first public address in New York City on Nov. 14 at the Council of School Supervisors &amp; Administrators' (CSA) 48th Educational Leadership Conference...Elia will deliver the keynote at CSA's Professional Development Plenary."</p> <p>***<br />Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Colin O'Connor, Konstantine Beridze, and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank">@GothamGazette</a></p> <p><img alt="New York City Hall" src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/640px-New_York_City_Hall.jpg" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">New York City Hall</span></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What to watch for this week in New York politics:</strong></p> <p>Wednesday is Veterans Day, with parades, resource fairs, and events to honor and aid veterans taking place before, on, and after the day itself. Mayor Bill de Blasio will hold a breakfast reception to honor the military veterans Wednesday morning. On Thursday, the City Council will hold a hearing on veteran homelessness, which the mayor vowed to end by the end of this year as part of a national pledge.</p> <p>The mayor and the City Council agreed last week to create a new Department of Veterans Services, removing the agency from the Mayor's Office and making veterans affairs its own city department, which will give it more resources and Council oversight. There will be a celebratory rally outside of City Hall on Tuesday at 11 a.m., then the veterans affairs committee of the Council will vote through the department bill, followed by the full Council.</p> <p>Could this be the week that First Lady Chirlane McCray unveils her much-anticipated "Mental Health Roadmap"? The week of Veterans Day would make sense considering the mental health challenges many veterans face. There's been no indication this is the week, but the 'roadmap' has been slated for release this fall. [Read <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5877-mccray-set-to-unveil-mental-health-roadmap-signature-de-blasio-plan" target="_blank">our extensive preview of McCray's mental health roadmap</a>]</p> <p>According to Citizens Budget Commission (CBC), the City will release its first quarter modification to the FY2016 budget this week. "In advance of that release, CBC <a href="http://www.cbcny.org/sites/default/files/PRESENTATION_11062015.pdf" target="_blank">compares</a> the Mayor's budget savings agenda, called the Citywide Savings Program, or CSP, with the Program to Eliminate the Gap (PEG) in fiscal years 2010 to 2015."</p> <p>After a marathon Friday press conference at which de Blasio answered dozens of questions from assembled reporters on a wide variety of subjects, the mayor had a quiet weekend. De Blasio continues to be scrutinized for his approach to the media, his administration's transparency, and several policy areas in which he is having the most challenges, such as homelessness, policing, and education. We'll see what this week holds other than a focus on veterans and the budget. On Monday morning the mayor is set to meet with members of the city's congressional delegation and then hold a media availability - at which he'll take both on- and off-topic questions.</p> <p>As always, there's a great deal happening&nbsp;all over the city, with many events to be aware of - read our day-by-day rundown below.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?</em><br /><em>E-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>***</em></p> <p><strong>The run of the week in detail:</strong></p> <p><strong>MONDAY<br /></strong>At the <a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/Calendar.aspx" target="_blank">City Council</a> on Monday:</p> <ul> <li>At 10:30 a.m. the Subcommittee on Planning, Dispositions and Concessions will convene to discuss several Land Use Applications in Brooklyn.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 11 a.m. the Committee on Land Use will meet.</li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">On Monday at 10 a.m.,&nbsp;Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams "will honor Brooklyn's military heroes at his "Start Strong, Finish Strong" resource fair for veterans...Additional speakers will include Mayor's Office of Veterans Affairs Commissioner Loree K. Sutton, a retired Army brigadier general, and USAG Fort Hamilton Command Sergeant Kevin Fauntleroy. Borough President Adams will speak about Brooklyn's commitment to its veterans, including his efforts to restore the Brooklyn War Memorial and to address mental health challenges facing the community."</p> <p dir="ltr">On Monday at 11 a.m., New York City Council Member Carlos Menchaca, along with Hetrick-Martin Institute CEO Thomas Krever and the LGBTQ Caucus of the City Council will unveil “HMI Goes Citywide For LGBTQ Youth,” a new initiative to address the challenges LGBTQ youth face in New York.</p> <p dir="ltr">"On Monday, Mayor de Blasio will meet with members of the New York Congressional Delegation at City Hall to discuss a number‎ of issues impacting New York City. This meeting is closed press.&nbsp;After, [at 11:30 a.m.] the Mayor and members of the Congressional Delegation will hold a media availability on the Zadroga Act on the steps of City Hall," according to his public schedule.</p> <p dir="ltr">At noon Monday, Crain’s New York Business will host its “<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/#utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=cnyb-events&amp;utm_campaign=cnyb-events-20151015" target="_blank">Crain’s Business Hall of Fame Luncheon</a>” to celebrate businesspeople who have transformed the city through their philanthropic and professional lives. The list of honorees include Ms. Pamela Brier, President and Chief Executive Officer, Maimonides Medical Center; Mr.Laurence Fink, Chairman and CEO, BlackRock; Ms. Shelly Lazarus, Chairman Emeritus, Ogilvy &amp; Mather; Mr. Alan Patricof, Managing Director Greycroft; The Honorable Richard Ravitch, Former Lieutenant Governor, New York; Ms. Emily Rafferty, President Emeritus, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; and Mr. Steven Roth, Chairman and CEO, Vornado Realty Trust. EisnerAmper will sponsor the event.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 12:30 p.m. on Monday, Public Advocate Letitia James will “announce measures to expand affordability of NYC child care.” Joined by parents, advocates and other stakeholders, James will hold a press conference about the costs and accessibility of child care in New York City, releasing a report and outlining five policies to help increase accessibility, capacity, and affordability.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 1 p.m. Monday at City Hal, the correction officers union will hold a press conference&nbsp;"following the vicious attack on a correction officer by two Rikers inmates."</p> <p dir="ltr">At 6 p.m. Monday, schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña will deliver remarks at a pre-K family forum at the Children's Museum of Manhattan.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 7 p.m. Monday, Comptroller Scott Stringer and Assembly Member Linda Rosenthal will co-host a town hall meeting at the Lincoln Square Neighborhood Center on West 65th Street.</p> <p dir="ltr">Also at 7 p.m. Monday, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer will speak at New York Historical Society’s “Debt of Honor” program.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>TUESDAY</strong><br />Tuesday is a “Fight for $15” day of action, with many events planned to bring attention to wage issues and push for a $15 per hour minimum wage. Unions, advocacy groups, elected officials, and others will participate. Worker strikes, rallies, and marches will take place throughout the day all over the city and the country.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 6:30 a.m., Mayor de Blasio&nbsp;"will deliver remarks at a Fight for $15 rally to raise the minimum wage...Immediately following his remarks, the Mayor will appear in several one-on-one interviews with local television networks to discuss the need to raise the minimum wage." At 2:15 p.m., the Mayor will appear live on WBLS 107.5 and at 2:30 p.m., on NY1. "In the evening, the Mayor will attend the 70th Annual Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner."</p> <p dir="ltr">State Senate Republicans will convene in Albany on Tuesday to discuss their 2016 agenda. (A week later Assembly Democrats will meet in the capital,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/albany/2015/11/8581887/assembly-democrats-plan-nov-17-return-albany" target="_blank">according to Politico New York</a>.)</p> <p dir="ltr">On Tuesday at 8 a.m., Chancellor of the State University of of New York Nancy Zimpher will speak at the Citizens Budget Commission breakfast at the Harvard Club. Zimpher will discuss SUNY projects and priorities.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 9 a.m. Tuesday the Board of Corrections will hold a meeting.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 11 a.m. Tuesday at City Hall, Council Speaker Mark-Viverito, Council Member Eric Ulrich, who chairs the Council’s veterans affairs committee, military veterans, and advocates will celebrate the imminent creation of a new City Department of Veterans Services.</p> <p dir="ltr">At the <a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/Calendar.aspx" target="_blank">City Council</a> on Tuesday, the City Council will convene for a full-body Stated Meeting, which, as always, will be prefaced by a press conference hosted by City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito at 12:30 p.m.</p> <p dir="ltr">Gov. Cuomo will make an announcement Tuesday at 4:15 p.m. in Manhattan at Foley Square, likely at a Fight for $15 event.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 6:30 p.m. the Committee on Drugs and Law of the New York City Bar Association will host a <a href="https://services.nycbar.org/iMIS/Events/Event_Display.aspx?EventKey=DRU111015&amp;WebsiteKey=f71e12f3-524e-4f8c-a5f7-0d16ce7b3314" target="_blank">discussion</a> on marijuana policy in New York. Panelists will include City Council Member Rafael Espinal, state Senator Jeff Klein, Vocal New York’s Alyssa Aguilera, and others.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 7 p.m. Tuesday, “Trans-Pacific Partnership: Who Wins and Who Loses in This Secret Deal?”, a panel event presented by the Big Apple Coffee Party and moderated by Zephyr Teachout, Fordham law professor and CEO of Mayday PAC.</p> <p dir="ltr">The only City Council Participatory Budgeting <a href="http://council.nyc.gov/html/pb/events.shtml" target="_blank">event</a> of the week is on Tuesday: Council Member David Greenfield (District 44, Brooklyn), 6:30 p.m.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>WEDNESDAY</strong><br />Wednesday is Veterans Day. At 8 a.m. Mayor de Blasio will hold a breakfast reception to honor and remember military veterans.</p> <p dir="ltr">On Wednesday evening, many New York politicos, policy wonks, and others will gather to celebrate the 25th anniversary of City Journal, the Manhattan Institute policy publication.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>THURSDAY</strong><br />On Thursday at 8 a.m. Association for Better New York will host a <a href="https://www.abny.org/Content/Events/EventTickets.aspx?EventID=182&amp;utm_source=ABNY+Event+Invitations+-+Non-members&amp;utm_campaign=ebc8e0c451-ABNY_Nonmembers_Breakfast_Carolyn_Maloney_Round3&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_term=0_e4e1abe544-ebc8e0c451-381180997" target="_blank">breakfast</a> with Congressional Rep. Carolyn Maloney, who will speak about the &nbsp;projects, as well as her other priorities.</p> <p dir="ltr">The next public meeting of the New York City Campaign Finance Board will be Thursday at 10 a.m.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz will hold a <a href="http://queensbp.org/event/queens-borough-presidents-land-use-hearing-2-2-2-2-3-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2/?instance_id=1352" target="_blank">Public Land Use Hearing</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Politico New York hosts <a href="http://www.politico.com/events/2015/11/new-york-playbook-215348" target="_blank">New York Playbook</a> Lunch, a discussion with Rep. Hakeem Jeffries and Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, hosted by playbook writers Azi Paybarah, Jimmy Vielkind, and Mike Allen.</p> <p dir="ltr">At the <a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/Calendar.aspx" target="_blank">City Council</a> on Thursday:</p> <ul> <li dir="ltr">At 10 a.m. the Committee on Transportation will meet for an oversight hearing on transportation deserts. The Committee will hear two bills: one to mandate a DOT study looking at the feasibility of a light rail system; another to mandate a study on transportation deserts. It will also look at resolutions calling on the MTA to allow commuters to pay the metrocard fare on commuter rails and to conduct a study on unused railroad rights.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 10 a.m. the Committee on Parks and Recreation will meet to hear CM Mark Levine’s bill that would create a taskforce to study the effects of building shadows on parks.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 10 a.m. the Committee on Aging will meet for oversight on DFTA’s home care program.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 10 a.m. the Committee on Housing and Buildings will meet to discuss a bill that would require residential buildings to have photoelectric smoke detectors.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 1 p.m. the Committee on Environmental Protection will meet to discuss two bills aimed at reducing noise by sightseeing helicopters.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 1 p.m. the Committee on Sanitation and Solid Waste Management will convene for oversight of DSNY’s 2016 snow plan, and the introduction of two bills that would identify pedestrian bridges and create plans for de-snowing and de-icing them and make exemptions for senior citizens and persons with disabilities from being penalized for failing to remove snow from on sidewalks.</li> <li dir="ltr">At 1:30 p.m. the Committee on Veterans, jointly with the Committee on General Welfare will meet for oversight of the City’s efforts to end homelessness among military veterans.</li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">Thursday at 5:30 p.m. at New York Law School: <a href="https://nyls.wufoo.com/forms/impact-thursday-2/" target="_blank">Law and the Lives of Young Black Men,</a>&nbsp;"featuring&nbsp;Richard Buery, Deputy Mayor for Strategic Policy Initiatives; Alphonso B. David, Counsel to the Governor; and Nicholas Turner, President and Director, Vera Institute of Justice. Moderated by Professor Mercer Givhan, New York Law School."</p> <p dir="ltr">Thursday evening, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries is holding a campaign fundraiser, a <a href="https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/hjcuomo" target="_blank">reception</a> with Gov. Andrew Cuomo as the honorary guest.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 6 p.m. Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. and the Bronx Borough Board will host a public hearing regarding the Zoning for Quality and Affordability and the Mandatory Inclusionary Housing proposals of Mayor de Blasio through the City Planning department and toward his housing plan.</p> <p dir="ltr">Mayor de Blasio will host a town hall meeting focused on education in Jackson Heights, Queens, Thursday evening. Council Member Daniel Dromm, who chairs the City Council education committee, will welcome de Blasio and his team to the district.</p> <p dir="ltr">At 7:30 p.m. Thursday, the New York City Department of Records and Information Services and WomensActivism.NYC will host the <a href="https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pe.c/10039568" target="_blank">celebration</a> of the 200th o birthday of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Women's Suffrage Centennial. Sponsored by the City of New York, the Mayor’s Fund to Advance NYC, The Cooper Union, and Lebenthal Asset Management, the event is expected to be attended by elected officials including Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer.</p> <p><strong>FRIDAY</strong><br />On Friday at 8:15 a.m. Vicki Been, the Commissioner for Housing Preservation and Development, will <a href="https://nyls.wufoo.com/forms/vicki-been-citylaw-breakfast/" target="_blank">speak </a>at the latest New York City Law School CityLaw breakfast event.</p> <p>On Saturday: "Newly appointed New York State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia will give her first public address in New York City on Nov. 14 at the Council of School Supervisors &amp; Administrators' (CSA) 48th Educational Leadership Conference...Elia will deliver the keynote at CSA's Professional Development Plenary."</p> <p>***<br />Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? E-mail Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a>&nbsp;(please use "For Week Ahead" as email subject).</p> <p>***<br />by Colin O'Connor, Konstantine Beridze, and Ben Max<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank">@GothamGazette</a></p> Combatting New York's Enduring Quality-of-Life Problem: Litter 2015-09-24T22:44:21+00:00 2015-09-24T22:44:21+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=5905:litter-new-yorks-enduring-quality-of-life-problem Super User <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/garcia_sanitation.jpg" alt="garcia sanitation" height="360" width="600" /></p> <p>DSNY Commissioner Garcia (photo: @NYCSanitation)</p> <hr /> <p>New York is safer and more prosperous than it's been in years, but the city still can't figure out how to stop people from trashing streets with litter.</p> <p>Despite a focus on quality of life issues, City Hall has made limited progress in dealing with a problem that has plagued mayors since the days when animals roamed Broadway. Even a small army of workers from the Department of Sanitation (DSNY), business improvement districts, and the Doe Fund still can't fully police 6,000 miles of city streets and more than 27,000 public waste and recycling baskets on a daily basis.</p> <p>Two bills discussed at a recent hearing held by the City Council's sanitation committee aim to increase penalties for littering and illegal dumping, by doubling them or more in some cases, in an effort to curb bad behavior.</p> <p>"It's not a cure-all for littering. It's not going to solve the littering problem that we have on Staten Island and our city. But it's part of a multi-pronged approach that my office and this Council has taken to combat littering," said Council Member Steven Matteo, Republican Minority Leader from Staten Island, at the hearing. "Littering is out of control in our city and it's out of control because we're doing it to ourselves."</p> <p>The city still receives high cleanliness scores, as <a href="http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/operations/downloads/pdf/9_Department%20of%20Sanitation%20Percent%20of%20Acceptably%20Clean%20Streets%20(Fiscal%201975-2015)_Download%20Report.pdf" target="_blank">determined</a> by the Mayor's Office of Operations, though the proportion of streets considered "acceptably clean" has slowly declined to 92.7 percent - though <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5611-bushwick-students-give-citys-street-cleanliness-scorecards-an-incomplete" target="_blank">even those numbers have been challenged</a>. With tourism and population growing every year, stray takeout containers and over-stuffed wastebaskets have become common sights. According to a Council briefing report, monthly 311 complaints about dirty sidewalks have nearly doubled from approximately 700 in July 2010 to 1,200 in April 2015.</p> <p>One bill -- introduced by Matteo with four other sponsors -- would increase the fines for littering from $50 to $250 for a first violation and up to $450 for a third or subsequent one.</p> <p>Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia supports <a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=2386612&amp;GUID=767E9976-6B1F-4C11-B201-3E8127BD2E64&amp;Options=&amp;Search=" target="_blank">the bill</a>, but warns about enforcement. Garcia said it would still be difficult for DSNY agents to issue tickets due to a lack of authority. A ticket can only be written if the offender is witnessed littering and agrees to provide their name. Sanitation agents aren't allowed to pull over drivers witnessed littering either. Because of this, DSNY issued just 746 littering violations from July 2014 through June 2015 (fiscal year 2015).</p> <p>Garcia said that if littering was reclassified as a criminal offense it would fall under the purview of the NYPD, which has larger issues to worry about. DSNY plans to begin sending stern letters to drivers caught in the act this fall, though Council members agreed that was unlikely to be a successful deterrent.</p> <p>Another bill -- introduced by Council Member Karen Koslowitz, a Queens Democrat, with eight other sponsors -- would increase fines for illegally dumping residential or commercial waste inside public baskets from $100 to $200 for a first violation and up to $600 for a third or subsequent violation. DSNY supports <a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=1687943&amp;GUID=34E48B6A-7353-412B-9EA4-79AABFB0F623&amp;Options=&amp;Search=" target="_blank">the bill</a>, but wants it to also include penalties for illegal dumping next to baskets.</p> <p>A 2005 DSNY <a href="http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/downloads/pdf/studies-and-reports/2004-2005-waste-characterization.pdf" target="_blank">study</a> showed illegal dumping accounting for 20 percent of all waste in public baskets. Due to some confusion over the state's new e-waste ban, TVs and computer parts have also begun showing up on street corners.</p> <p>After the Council hearing, Garcia told Gotham Gazette that the city is always looking for ways to make waste disposal easier by installing new types of baskets and increasing education. She said that DSNY plans to continue fighting litter based in part on the "broken windows" theory often cited by NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton.</p> <p>"If people see one gum wrapper, they think nothing of adding their fourth and fifth gum wrapper," she said. "So we really try and stay ahead of it."</p> <p>While some New Yorkers don't seem to care about keeping their streets clean, multiple Quinnipiac polls show that others are bothered by the issue.</p> <p>In 2009, when streets were rated at their peak cleanliness levels, 42 percent of registered voters <a href="http://www.quinnipiac.edu/news-and-events/quinnipiac-university-poll/search-releases/search-results/release-detail?What=&amp;strArea=3;0;&amp;strTime=28&amp;ReleaseID=1253#Question017" target="_blank">said</a> the city wasn't doing enough about "quality of life offenses" such as littering and loud music. In 1998, when streets were rated slightly dirtier than today, 51 percent of residents <a href="http://www.quinnipiac.edu/news-and-events/quinnipiac-university-poll/search-releases/search-results/release-detail?What=&amp;strArea=3;0;&amp;strTime=28&amp;ReleaseID=782#Question024" target="_blank">said</a> they considered littering to be a "very serious problem."</p> <p>Robin Nagle, an NYU anthropology professor who specializes in "discard studies," said the city has been trying to tackle this issue for a very long time. Under George Waring, a prominent sanitation commissioner during the 1890s, nearly 1,000 young children were enrolled in Juvenile Street Cleaning Leagues to police the streets and raise awareness by writing fake tickets.</p> <p>Nagle doesn't think such an effort would be successful today, but said there needs to be a greater sense of shared responsibility. She said that other countries have already found ways to crack down on littering and wondered if society's attitude toward it will someday shift similar to smoking.</p> <p>"How do we help people be a little less selfish without telling them that they are selfish?" she asked. "When you're on the street you're sharing a commons. You're sharing a place that is not only yours, but is ours."</p> <p>Anti-littering <a href="http://www.nyc.gov/html/dep/html/press_releases/15-059pr.shtml#.VgRIpGRViko" target="_blank">messages</a> from government agencies are posted on bus stops, subways, trash cans and DSNY vehicles. They range from the annual summer environmental appeal of "Clean Streets = Clean Beaches" to the MTA's subway announcement about trash-related track fires causing delays.</p> <p>Recently, elected officials and community members have decided to address the problem on a more local level. For the second year in a row, the City Council funded a $3.5 million clean-up initiative in Fiscal Year 2015 to help district efforts. Other officials have also taken up the cause.</p> <p>Staten Island Borough President James Oddo's "Operation Clean Sweep" is responsible for cleaning 120 locations since April. His office <a href="http://www.statenislandusa.com/cleanupsi.html" target="_blank">has partnered</a> with local businesses to create public service announcements and help maintain their areas through programs such as the city's "Adopt-a-Basket." In April, Oddo also announced a public-private partnership between the Institute of Scrap Recycling, Jason Learning, and multiple city agencies to create a pro-recycling/anti-litter curriculum in 10 local schools.</p> <p>"Litter is a problem that is created by a small number of people, but one that affects everyone. All of us have to deal with the filth that collects on the side of the road, making our community look uninviting and run down," said Jennifer Sammartino, Oddo's communications director, in an emailed statement. "The more litter we have on our streets the more it becomes an accepted part of life."</p> <p>A group of frustrated citizens working with the Greenpoint Chamber of Commerce <a href="http://greenpointchamber.com/curb-your-litter-greenpoint" target="_blank">have taken on the problem</a> in Brooklyn with a project called "Curb Your Litter: Greenpoint." Funded by $570,000 obtained from a state settlement with ExxonMobil over a local oil spill, the project will spend three years studying the sources and types of litter with the help of cutting-edge sustainable planning firm Closed Loops. They will also work with local businesses, create educational material and soon launch an interactive website for the community to have input about new baskets.</p> <p>The project's director, Caroline Bauer, said that so far volunteers have picked up nearly 1,500 pounds of trash on 135 blocks this year. She supports the two new City Council bills, which may be voted on at an upcoming committee hearing, but said that ultimately it's up to New Yorkers to come together over what should be a simple issue.</p> <p>"Litter is something that nobody enjoys," said Bauer. "It really erodes the way that you think of the community and your neighborhood."</p> <p>***<br />by Cole Rosengren for Gotham Gazette<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/ColeRosengrenNY" target="_blank">@ColeRosengrenNY</a><br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank">@GothamGazette</a></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/garcia_sanitation.jpg" alt="garcia sanitation" height="360" width="600" /></p> <p>DSNY Commissioner Garcia (photo: @NYCSanitation)</p> <hr /> <p>New York is safer and more prosperous than it's been in years, but the city still can't figure out how to stop people from trashing streets with litter.</p> <p>Despite a focus on quality of life issues, City Hall has made limited progress in dealing with a problem that has plagued mayors since the days when animals roamed Broadway. Even a small army of workers from the Department of Sanitation (DSNY), business improvement districts, and the Doe Fund still can't fully police 6,000 miles of city streets and more than 27,000 public waste and recycling baskets on a daily basis.</p> <p>Two bills discussed at a recent hearing held by the City Council's sanitation committee aim to increase penalties for littering and illegal dumping, by doubling them or more in some cases, in an effort to curb bad behavior.</p> <p>"It's not a cure-all for littering. It's not going to solve the littering problem that we have on Staten Island and our city. But it's part of a multi-pronged approach that my office and this Council has taken to combat littering," said Council Member Steven Matteo, Republican Minority Leader from Staten Island, at the hearing. "Littering is out of control in our city and it's out of control because we're doing it to ourselves."</p> <p>The city still receives high cleanliness scores, as <a href="http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/operations/downloads/pdf/9_Department%20of%20Sanitation%20Percent%20of%20Acceptably%20Clean%20Streets%20(Fiscal%201975-2015)_Download%20Report.pdf" target="_blank">determined</a> by the Mayor's Office of Operations, though the proportion of streets considered "acceptably clean" has slowly declined to 92.7 percent - though <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5611-bushwick-students-give-citys-street-cleanliness-scorecards-an-incomplete" target="_blank">even those numbers have been challenged</a>. With tourism and population growing every year, stray takeout containers and over-stuffed wastebaskets have become common sights. According to a Council briefing report, monthly 311 complaints about dirty sidewalks have nearly doubled from approximately 700 in July 2010 to 1,200 in April 2015.</p> <p>One bill -- introduced by Matteo with four other sponsors -- would increase the fines for littering from $50 to $250 for a first violation and up to $450 for a third or subsequent one.</p> <p>Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia supports <a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=2386612&amp;GUID=767E9976-6B1F-4C11-B201-3E8127BD2E64&amp;Options=&amp;Search=" target="_blank">the bill</a>, but warns about enforcement. Garcia said it would still be difficult for DSNY agents to issue tickets due to a lack of authority. A ticket can only be written if the offender is witnessed littering and agrees to provide their name. Sanitation agents aren't allowed to pull over drivers witnessed littering either. Because of this, DSNY issued just 746 littering violations from July 2014 through June 2015 (fiscal year 2015).</p> <p>Garcia said that if littering was reclassified as a criminal offense it would fall under the purview of the NYPD, which has larger issues to worry about. DSNY plans to begin sending stern letters to drivers caught in the act this fall, though Council members agreed that was unlikely to be a successful deterrent.</p> <p>Another bill -- introduced by Council Member Karen Koslowitz, a Queens Democrat, with eight other sponsors -- would increase fines for illegally dumping residential or commercial waste inside public baskets from $100 to $200 for a first violation and up to $600 for a third or subsequent violation. DSNY supports <a href="http://legistar.council.nyc.gov/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=1687943&amp;GUID=34E48B6A-7353-412B-9EA4-79AABFB0F623&amp;Options=&amp;Search=" target="_blank">the bill</a>, but wants it to also include penalties for illegal dumping next to baskets.</p> <p>A 2005 DSNY <a href="http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/downloads/pdf/studies-and-reports/2004-2005-waste-characterization.pdf" target="_blank">study</a> showed illegal dumping accounting for 20 percent of all waste in public baskets. Due to some confusion over the state's new e-waste ban, TVs and computer parts have also begun showing up on street corners.</p> <p>After the Council hearing, Garcia told Gotham Gazette that the city is always looking for ways to make waste disposal easier by installing new types of baskets and increasing education. She said that DSNY plans to continue fighting litter based in part on the "broken windows" theory often cited by NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton.</p> <p>"If people see one gum wrapper, they think nothing of adding their fourth and fifth gum wrapper," she said. "So we really try and stay ahead of it."</p> <p>While some New Yorkers don't seem to care about keeping their streets clean, multiple Quinnipiac polls show that others are bothered by the issue.</p> <p>In 2009, when streets were rated at their peak cleanliness levels, 42 percent of registered voters <a href="http://www.quinnipiac.edu/news-and-events/quinnipiac-university-poll/search-releases/search-results/release-detail?What=&amp;strArea=3;0;&amp;strTime=28&amp;ReleaseID=1253#Question017" target="_blank">said</a> the city wasn't doing enough about "quality of life offenses" such as littering and loud music. In 1998, when streets were rated slightly dirtier than today, 51 percent of residents <a href="http://www.quinnipiac.edu/news-and-events/quinnipiac-university-poll/search-releases/search-results/release-detail?What=&amp;strArea=3;0;&amp;strTime=28&amp;ReleaseID=782#Question024" target="_blank">said</a> they considered littering to be a "very serious problem."</p> <p>Robin Nagle, an NYU anthropology professor who specializes in "discard studies," said the city has been trying to tackle this issue for a very long time. Under George Waring, a prominent sanitation commissioner during the 1890s, nearly 1,000 young children were enrolled in Juvenile Street Cleaning Leagues to police the streets and raise awareness by writing fake tickets.</p> <p>Nagle doesn't think such an effort would be successful today, but said there needs to be a greater sense of shared responsibility. She said that other countries have already found ways to crack down on littering and wondered if society's attitude toward it will someday shift similar to smoking.</p> <p>"How do we help people be a little less selfish without telling them that they are selfish?" she asked. "When you're on the street you're sharing a commons. You're sharing a place that is not only yours, but is ours."</p> <p>Anti-littering <a href="http://www.nyc.gov/html/dep/html/press_releases/15-059pr.shtml#.VgRIpGRViko" target="_blank">messages</a> from government agencies are posted on bus stops, subways, trash cans and DSNY vehicles. They range from the annual summer environmental appeal of "Clean Streets = Clean Beaches" to the MTA's subway announcement about trash-related track fires causing delays.</p> <p>Recently, elected officials and community members have decided to address the problem on a more local level. For the second year in a row, the City Council funded a $3.5 million clean-up initiative in Fiscal Year 2015 to help district efforts. Other officials have also taken up the cause.</p> <p>Staten Island Borough President James Oddo's "Operation Clean Sweep" is responsible for cleaning 120 locations since April. His office <a href="http://www.statenislandusa.com/cleanupsi.html" target="_blank">has partnered</a> with local businesses to create public service announcements and help maintain their areas through programs such as the city's "Adopt-a-Basket." In April, Oddo also announced a public-private partnership between the Institute of Scrap Recycling, Jason Learning, and multiple city agencies to create a pro-recycling/anti-litter curriculum in 10 local schools.</p> <p>"Litter is a problem that is created by a small number of people, but one that affects everyone. All of us have to deal with the filth that collects on the side of the road, making our community look uninviting and run down," said Jennifer Sammartino, Oddo's communications director, in an emailed statement. "The more litter we have on our streets the more it becomes an accepted part of life."</p> <p>A group of frustrated citizens working with the Greenpoint Chamber of Commerce <a href="http://greenpointchamber.com/curb-your-litter-greenpoint" target="_blank">have taken on the problem</a> in Brooklyn with a project called "Curb Your Litter: Greenpoint." Funded by $570,000 obtained from a state settlement with ExxonMobil over a local oil spill, the project will spend three years studying the sources and types of litter with the help of cutting-edge sustainable planning firm Closed Loops. They will also work with local businesses, create educational material and soon launch an interactive website for the community to have input about new baskets.</p> <p>The project's director, Caroline Bauer, said that so far volunteers have picked up nearly 1,500 pounds of trash on 135 blocks this year. She supports the two new City Council bills, which may be voted on at an upcoming committee hearing, but said that ultimately it's up to New Yorkers to come together over what should be a simple issue.</p> <p>"Litter is something that nobody enjoys," said Bauer. "It really erodes the way that you think of the community and your neighborhood."</p> <p>***<br />by Cole Rosengren for Gotham Gazette<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/ColeRosengrenNY" target="_blank">@ColeRosengrenNY</a><br /><a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank">@GothamGazette</a></p>