Gotham Gazette Gotham Gazette is an online publication covering New York policy and politics as well as news on public safety, transportation, education, finance and more. http://www.gothamgazette.com/component/tags/tag/elections 2019-01-22T02:31:36+00:00 Webmaster webmaster@gothamgazette.com The 2019 Special Election for Public Advocate 2019-01-21T05:00:00+00:00 2019-01-21T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8188-the-2019-special-election-for-public-advocate Ben Max <p>(l-r) Tish James, Ydanis Rodriguez, Melissa Mark-viverito, Jumaane Williams, Latrice Walker<br />Rafael Espinal, Danny O'Donnell, Michael Blake, Erich Ulrich, Ron Kim</p> <hr /> <p>Paragraph</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8175-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-public-advocate-special-election" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com//images/graphics/2018/ballot-tish.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8175-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-public-advocate-special-election" target="_blank">Everything You Need to Know About the Special Election for Public Advocate</a></p> <p>January 04, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8201-23-candidates-submit-petitions-to-get-on-february-26-public-advocate-ballot" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/first-ave-marathon.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8201-23-candidates-submit-petitions-to-get-on-february-26-public-advocate-ballot" target="_blank" rel="noopener">23 Candidates Submit Petitions to Get on February 26 Public Advocate Ballot</a></p> <p>January 15, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8204-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-michael-blake" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/michael-blake-400px.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8204-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-michael-blake" target="_blank">Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Michael Blake</a></p> <p>January 17, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8205-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-danny-o-donnell" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/danny-odonnell-400b.jpg" alt="danny odonnell 400b" width="200" height="84" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8205-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-danny-o-donnell" target="_blank">Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Danny O'Donnell</a></p> <p>January 17, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8206-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-dawn-smalls" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/dawn-smalls-400.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8206-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-dawn-smalls" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Dawn Smalls</a></p> <p>January 17, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8208-in-first-mailer-of-public-advocate-race-kim-targets-amazon-and-prominent-opponents" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/box-kim-mail1600.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8208-in-first-mailer-of-public-advocate-race-kim-targets-amazon-and-prominent-opponents" target="_blank" rel="noopener">In First Mailer of Public Advocate Race, Kim Targets Amazon, and Prominent Opponents</a></p> <p>January 17, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/daocvcdmv4aezxir.jpg" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/elec-apoll.jpg" alt="daocvcdmv4aezxir" width="200" height="94" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8196-public-advocate-election-makes-case-for-instant-runoff-voting" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Public Advocate Election Makes Case for Instant Runoff Voting</a> (opinion)</p> <p>January 14, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8187-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-eric-ulrich"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/eric-ulrich-january-9-400.jpg" alt="Public Advocate Candidate Eric Ulrich" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8187-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-eric-ulrich" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Eric Ulrich</a></p> <p>January 10, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8173-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-rafael-espinal" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/rafael-espinal-1-2-wbai-400.jpg" alt="rafael espinal 1 2 wbai 400" width="200" height="84" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8173-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-rafael-espinal" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Rafael Espinal</a></p> <p>January 03, 2019</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8149-my-vision-for-the-role-of-public-advocate-ron-kim" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com//images/graphics/2018/rk_city_hll.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8149-my-vision-for-the-role-of-public-advocate-ron-kim" target="_blank">My Vision for the Role of Public Advocate: Ron Kim</a> (opinion)</p> <p>December 18, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8136-declared-or-exploring-candidates-for-new-york-city-public-advocate" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/10-candidates.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8136-declared-or-exploring-candidates-for-new-york-city-public-advocate" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Declared and Exploring Candidates for New York City Public Advocate</a></p> <p>December 12, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8124-handicapping-the-public-advocate-special-election" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com//images/graphics/2018/14907018821_253c6b17b0_z.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8124-handicapping-the-public-advocate-special-election" target="_blank">Handicapping the Public Advocate Special Election</a> (opinion)</p> <p>December 06, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8105-promising-to-tell-new-yorkers-the-truth-mark-viverito-launches-public-advocate-campaign" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/11847446706_6aea306d5e_z.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8105-promising-to-tell-new-yorkers-the-truth-mark-viverito-launches-public-advocate-campaign" target="_blank">Promising to 'Tell New Yorkers the Truth,' Mark-Viverito Launches Public Advocate Campaign</a></p> <p>November 28, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/public-adv-debate-first-ls.png" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8076-at-first-debate-candidates-for-public-advocate-pitch-visions-for-the-role" target="_blank" rel="noopener">At First Debate, Candidates for Public Advocate Pitch Visions for the Role</a></p> <p>November 16, 2018</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8074-listen-public-advocate-candidate-forum-nov-2018" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/pa_forum_aarp_afterward.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8074-listen-public-advocate-candidate-forum-nov-2018" target="_blank" rel="noopener">LISTEN: Public Advocate Candidate Forum - Nov. 14, 2018</a></p> <p>November 14, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8069-field-for-public-advocate-special-election-comes-into-focus" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/39766002621_7e972f43a2_z.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8069-field-for-public-advocate-special-election-comes-into-focus" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Field for Public Advocate Special Election Comes Into Focus</a></p> <p>November 13, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8013-in-run-for-public-advocate-blake-offers-federal-and-state-experience" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/michael-blake-pub-adv-city.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8013-in-run-for-public-advocate-blake-offers-federal-and-state-experience" target="_blank" rel="noopener">In Run for New York City Public Advocate, Blake Offers Federal and State Experience</a></p> <p>October 25, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7918-vacancy-in-the-public-advocate-s-office-call-the-city-council-speaker" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/tish-james-co-jo-cityhall.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7918-vacancy-in-the-public-advocate-s-office-call-the-city-council-speaker" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Vacancy in the Public Advocate's Office? Call the City Council Speaker&nbsp;<span data-sheets-value="{&quot;1&quot;:2,&quot;2&quot;:&quot;Vacancy in the Public Advocate's Office? Call the City Council Speaker&quot;}" data-sheets-userformat="{&quot;2&quot;:771,&quot;3&quot;:{&quot;1&quot;:0},&quot;4&quot;:[null,2,15389148],&quot;11&quot;:0,&quot;12&quot;:0}"></span></a></p> <p>September 07, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7910-potentially-crowded-public-advocate-special-election-could-feature-two-former-council-speakers" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/3749385121_4288a8d47c_z.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7910-potentially-crowded-public-advocate-special-election-could-feature-two-former-council-speakers" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Potentially Crowded Public Advocate Special Election Could Feature Two Former Council Speakers</a></p> <p>September 04, 2018</p> <p>(l-r) Tish James, Ydanis Rodriguez, Melissa Mark-viverito, Jumaane Williams, Latrice Walker<br />Rafael Espinal, Danny O'Donnell, Michael Blake, Erich Ulrich, Ron Kim</p> <hr /> <p>Paragraph</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8175-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-public-advocate-special-election" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com//images/graphics/2018/ballot-tish.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8175-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-public-advocate-special-election" target="_blank">Everything You Need to Know About the Special Election for Public Advocate</a></p> <p>January 04, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8201-23-candidates-submit-petitions-to-get-on-february-26-public-advocate-ballot" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/first-ave-marathon.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8201-23-candidates-submit-petitions-to-get-on-february-26-public-advocate-ballot" target="_blank" rel="noopener">23 Candidates Submit Petitions to Get on February 26 Public Advocate Ballot</a></p> <p>January 15, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8204-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-michael-blake" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/michael-blake-400px.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8204-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-michael-blake" target="_blank">Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Michael Blake</a></p> <p>January 17, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8205-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-danny-o-donnell" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/danny-odonnell-400b.jpg" alt="danny odonnell 400b" width="200" height="84" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8205-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-danny-o-donnell" target="_blank">Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Danny O'Donnell</a></p> <p>January 17, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8206-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-dawn-smalls" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/dawn-smalls-400.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8206-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-dawn-smalls" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Dawn Smalls</a></p> <p>January 17, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8208-in-first-mailer-of-public-advocate-race-kim-targets-amazon-and-prominent-opponents" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/box-kim-mail1600.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8208-in-first-mailer-of-public-advocate-race-kim-targets-amazon-and-prominent-opponents" target="_blank" rel="noopener">In First Mailer of Public Advocate Race, Kim Targets Amazon, and Prominent Opponents</a></p> <p>January 17, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/daocvcdmv4aezxir.jpg" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/elec-apoll.jpg" alt="daocvcdmv4aezxir" width="200" height="94" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8196-public-advocate-election-makes-case-for-instant-runoff-voting" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Public Advocate Election Makes Case for Instant Runoff Voting</a> (opinion)</p> <p>January 14, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8187-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-eric-ulrich"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/eric-ulrich-january-9-400.jpg" alt="Public Advocate Candidate Eric Ulrich" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8187-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-eric-ulrich" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Eric Ulrich</a></p> <p>January 10, 2019</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8173-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-rafael-espinal" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/rafael-espinal-1-2-wbai-400.jpg" alt="rafael espinal 1 2 wbai 400" width="200" height="84" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8173-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-rafael-espinal" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Rafael Espinal</a></p> <p>January 03, 2019</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8149-my-vision-for-the-role-of-public-advocate-ron-kim" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com//images/graphics/2018/rk_city_hll.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8149-my-vision-for-the-role-of-public-advocate-ron-kim" target="_blank">My Vision for the Role of Public Advocate: Ron Kim</a> (opinion)</p> <p>December 18, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8136-declared-or-exploring-candidates-for-new-york-city-public-advocate" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/10-candidates.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8136-declared-or-exploring-candidates-for-new-york-city-public-advocate" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Declared and Exploring Candidates for New York City Public Advocate</a></p> <p>December 12, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8124-handicapping-the-public-advocate-special-election" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com//images/graphics/2018/14907018821_253c6b17b0_z.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8124-handicapping-the-public-advocate-special-election" target="_blank">Handicapping the Public Advocate Special Election</a> (opinion)</p> <p>December 06, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8105-promising-to-tell-new-yorkers-the-truth-mark-viverito-launches-public-advocate-campaign" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/11847446706_6aea306d5e_z.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8105-promising-to-tell-new-yorkers-the-truth-mark-viverito-launches-public-advocate-campaign" target="_blank">Promising to 'Tell New Yorkers the Truth,' Mark-Viverito Launches Public Advocate Campaign</a></p> <p>November 28, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/public-adv-debate-first-ls.png" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8076-at-first-debate-candidates-for-public-advocate-pitch-visions-for-the-role" target="_blank" rel="noopener">At First Debate, Candidates for Public Advocate Pitch Visions for the Role</a></p> <p>November 16, 2018</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8074-listen-public-advocate-candidate-forum-nov-2018" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/pa_forum_aarp_afterward.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8074-listen-public-advocate-candidate-forum-nov-2018" target="_blank" rel="noopener">LISTEN: Public Advocate Candidate Forum - Nov. 14, 2018</a></p> <p>November 14, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8069-field-for-public-advocate-special-election-comes-into-focus" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/39766002621_7e972f43a2_z.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8069-field-for-public-advocate-special-election-comes-into-focus" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Field for Public Advocate Special Election Comes Into Focus</a></p> <p>November 13, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8013-in-run-for-public-advocate-blake-offers-federal-and-state-experience" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/michael-blake-pub-adv-city.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8013-in-run-for-public-advocate-blake-offers-federal-and-state-experience" target="_blank" rel="noopener">In Run for New York City Public Advocate, Blake Offers Federal and State Experience</a></p> <p>October 25, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7918-vacancy-in-the-public-advocate-s-office-call-the-city-council-speaker" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/tish-james-co-jo-cityhall.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7918-vacancy-in-the-public-advocate-s-office-call-the-city-council-speaker" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Vacancy in the Public Advocate's Office? Call the City Council Speaker&nbsp;<span data-sheets-value="{&quot;1&quot;:2,&quot;2&quot;:&quot;Vacancy in the Public Advocate's Office? Call the City Council Speaker&quot;}" data-sheets-userformat="{&quot;2&quot;:771,&quot;3&quot;:{&quot;1&quot;:0},&quot;4&quot;:[null,2,15389148],&quot;11&quot;:0,&quot;12&quot;:0}"></span></a></p> <p>September 07, 2018</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table style="float: left; padding-right: 10px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7910-potentially-crowded-public-advocate-special-election-could-feature-two-former-council-speakers" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/3749385121_4288a8d47c_z.jpg" alt="podcast spacer" width="200" style="margin-right: 10px;" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7910-potentially-crowded-public-advocate-special-election-could-feature-two-former-council-speakers" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Potentially Crowded Public Advocate Special Election Could Feature Two Former Council Speakers</a></p> <p>September 04, 2018</p> In First Mailer of Public Advocate Race, Kim Targets Amazon, and Prominent Opponents 2019-01-16T05:00:00+00:00 2019-01-16T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8208-in-first-mailer-of-public-advocate-race-kim-targets-amazon-and-prominent-opponents Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/box-kim-mail1600.jpg" alt="box kim mail1600" width="600" height="548" /></p> <p>(portion of Ron Kim mailer)</p> <hr /> <p>Assemblymember Ron Kim, a candidate for New York City Public Advocate, sent out the first mailed advertisement of his campaign this week, touting his early opposition to the deal between Amazon and New York, and contrasting it with other leading candidates in the race.</p> <p>The advertisement appears to be the first mailer of the race, a sprint to the February 26 special election to fill now-Attorney General Letitia James’ former seat. Notably, it jabs at four perceived frontrunners, highlighting their signatures on an October 2017 letter signed by most elected officials in New York City to Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon, urging him to bring the second Amazon headquarters to New York. Over a year later, the corporate giant and New York City and State officials announced the controversial deal that is now a flashpoint in the public advocate race. Kim, who did not sign the letter, is running on a <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8149-my-vision-for-the-role-of-public-advocate-ron-kim" target="_blank" rel="noopener">platform</a> of “people over corporations” and a promise to reinvent the public advocate’s office.</p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/pages-from-kim-mai32.jpg" alt="Ron Kim mailer" width="250" height="530" style="margin-right: 12px; float: left;" />Specifically, the signatures of fellow public advocate candidates blown up on the mailer are former City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, State Assembly Member Michael Blake, and City Council Members Ydanis Rodriguez and Jumaane Williams -- all Democrats like Kim, who represents parts of Queens. Since signing the letter, which was a broad overture, Mark-Viverito, Blake, and Williams have rejected the specific deal that was reached for an Amazon campus in Queens, which includes roughly $3 billion in tax incentives and grants from the city and state. Rodriguez's position on the Amazon deal is less clear, and his office did not respond to a request for comment.</p> <p>The mailer reads: “Assembly Member Ron Kim is running for to put Public Advocate for one simple reason: people over corporations. That means an end to corporate giveaways, reforming student debt and busting the mega-monopolies that govern our lives. He knows that the only way to truly help New Yorkers is to once and for all put people over corporations.”</p> <p>The letter to Bezos is essentially a sales pitch for New York City and cites many resources, like the high number of startups in New York as well as the large population Amazon would have at its disposal.</p> <p>“After they saw the backlash, [Mark-Viverito, Blake, Rodriguez, Williams] all of a sudden changed their position against Amazon for political expediency,” Kim said by email.</p> <p>Other prominent elected officials not to sign the letter <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7266-top-city-electeds-skip-letter-wooing-amazon" target="_blank" rel="noopener">were</a> Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, city Comptroller Scott Stringer, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, and Queens City Council Member Donovan Richards, as well as two other current public advocate candidates: Rafael Espinal, a City Council member from Brooklyn, and Danny O'Donnell, an Assembly member from Manhattan.</p> <p>Kim has spoken out against the Amazon deal since before it was announced. In<a href="http://www.qchron.com/editions/queenswide/kim-amazon-should-not-come-to-queens/article_b42ed3f6-7213-5066-b74e-02fc0782a2ac.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> comments</a> to Queens Chronicle about two weeks before Amazon and New York announced the deal, he rejected a possible agreement to bring the online giant to the city. He co-wrote two op-eds heavily critical of Amazon and the deal, <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/opinion/amazon-new-york-business.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">first</a> in the New York Times with 2018 New York Attorney General candidate Zephyr Teachout, and <a href="https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-the-alternative-to-throwing-money-at-mega-corporations-20181120-story.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">another</a> two weeks later in the New York Daily News with then-State Senator-elect Jessica Ramos.</p> <p>Shortly after details of the deal were released, Assemblymember Kim announced legislation to block the incentives offered to Amazon and use the money to buy and cancel student debt. As public advocate, he would introduce similar legislation in the City Council.</p> <p>Opposition to the Amazon deal fits Kim’s thematic messaging for his campaign, he’ll even be on the self-created “People Over Corporations” ballot line on Feb. 26, which includes that push to cancel student debt and promoting local small businesses. The mailer describes the deal as a corporate giveaway and calls for investment in the MTA, schools, and affordable housing instead of the billions of incentives in the Amazon deal.</p> <p>The role of public advocate is intentionally flexible in the New York City Charter, but the three duties most often assumed by public advocates are introducing legislation in the City Council, bringing issues to the front of public discourse, and serving as a watchdog of city agencies. It appears there is little the next public advocate can do about the Amazon deal, but the most likely influence would be through applying public pressure on Mayor Bill de Blasio to cancel or make significant changes to the deal.</p> <p>“As the ombudsman for the people of New York City, the Public Advocate has a strong bully pulpit which I will use to convince (both publicly and privately) my colleagues in government to reject the Amazon HQ2 deal,” said Kim.</p> <p>The public advocate election to be held next month will have a large field of candidates. Twenty-three hopefuls <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8201-23-candidates-submit-petitions-to-get-on-february-26-public-advocate-ballot" target="_blank" rel="noopener">submitted</a> the required 3,750 signatures to the New York City Board of Elections by the Monday deadline. Also running are Queens City Council Member Eric Ulrich, Assemblymembers Daniel O’Donnell of Manhattan and Latrice Walker of Brooklyn, former Obama and Clinton administration attorney Dawn Smalls, and journalist and activist Nomiki Konst, among many others.</p> <p>With competitors trying to set themselves apart, Kim clearly sees Amazon opposition as a winning part of the strategy. Asked about how many mailers his campaign sent, where they were sent, and how much was spent on them, he only said, “I sent the mailer to a broad universe of likely voters across New York City.”</p> <p>Two names noticeably did not appear on the mailer: Mayor Bill de Blasio and Governor Andrew Cuomo, the leaders of negotiations with Amazon executives who held a joint celebratory November press conference to announce the deal. De Blasio and Cuomo were immediately and loudly criticized for the deal by a number of elected officials and activists, though they also got some praise and the only public poll on it shows a mixed bag, but with more support than not. The criticism stemmed from the lack of transparency and oversight involved in the process, the incentives involved, Amazon’s business practices, and the potential impact on local housing prices and infrastructure.</p> <p>“Both were wrong to offer $3 billion in taxpayer handouts to Amazon instead of funding MTA reconstruction, affordable housing development, programs to fight climate change or a whole host of other priorities,” said Kim, when asked about omitting de Blasio and Cuomo from the mailer. “But neither the Governor nor the Mayor are running for Public Advocate.”</p> <p>

***
by Truman Stephens, Gotham Gazette

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/box-kim-mail1600.jpg" alt="box kim mail1600" width="600" height="548" /></p> <p>(portion of Ron Kim mailer)</p> <hr /> <p>Assemblymember Ron Kim, a candidate for New York City Public Advocate, sent out the first mailed advertisement of his campaign this week, touting his early opposition to the deal between Amazon and New York, and contrasting it with other leading candidates in the race.</p> <p>The advertisement appears to be the first mailer of the race, a sprint to the February 26 special election to fill now-Attorney General Letitia James’ former seat. Notably, it jabs at four perceived frontrunners, highlighting their signatures on an October 2017 letter signed by most elected officials in New York City to Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon, urging him to bring the second Amazon headquarters to New York. Over a year later, the corporate giant and New York City and State officials announced the controversial deal that is now a flashpoint in the public advocate race. Kim, who did not sign the letter, is running on a <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/opinion/8149-my-vision-for-the-role-of-public-advocate-ron-kim" target="_blank" rel="noopener">platform</a> of “people over corporations” and a promise to reinvent the public advocate’s office.</p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/pages-from-kim-mai32.jpg" alt="Ron Kim mailer" width="250" height="530" style="margin-right: 12px; float: left;" />Specifically, the signatures of fellow public advocate candidates blown up on the mailer are former City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, State Assembly Member Michael Blake, and City Council Members Ydanis Rodriguez and Jumaane Williams -- all Democrats like Kim, who represents parts of Queens. Since signing the letter, which was a broad overture, Mark-Viverito, Blake, and Williams have rejected the specific deal that was reached for an Amazon campus in Queens, which includes roughly $3 billion in tax incentives and grants from the city and state. Rodriguez's position on the Amazon deal is less clear, and his office did not respond to a request for comment.</p> <p>The mailer reads: “Assembly Member Ron Kim is running for to put Public Advocate for one simple reason: people over corporations. That means an end to corporate giveaways, reforming student debt and busting the mega-monopolies that govern our lives. He knows that the only way to truly help New Yorkers is to once and for all put people over corporations.”</p> <p>The letter to Bezos is essentially a sales pitch for New York City and cites many resources, like the high number of startups in New York as well as the large population Amazon would have at its disposal.</p> <p>“After they saw the backlash, [Mark-Viverito, Blake, Rodriguez, Williams] all of a sudden changed their position against Amazon for political expediency,” Kim said by email.</p> <p>Other prominent elected officials not to sign the letter <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7266-top-city-electeds-skip-letter-wooing-amazon" target="_blank" rel="noopener">were</a> Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, city Comptroller Scott Stringer, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, and Queens City Council Member Donovan Richards, as well as two other current public advocate candidates: Rafael Espinal, a City Council member from Brooklyn, and Danny O'Donnell, an Assembly member from Manhattan.</p> <p>Kim has spoken out against the Amazon deal since before it was announced. In<a href="http://www.qchron.com/editions/queenswide/kim-amazon-should-not-come-to-queens/article_b42ed3f6-7213-5066-b74e-02fc0782a2ac.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> comments</a> to Queens Chronicle about two weeks before Amazon and New York announced the deal, he rejected a possible agreement to bring the online giant to the city. He co-wrote two op-eds heavily critical of Amazon and the deal, <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/opinion/amazon-new-york-business.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">first</a> in the New York Times with 2018 New York Attorney General candidate Zephyr Teachout, and <a href="https://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-the-alternative-to-throwing-money-at-mega-corporations-20181120-story.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">another</a> two weeks later in the New York Daily News with then-State Senator-elect Jessica Ramos.</p> <p>Shortly after details of the deal were released, Assemblymember Kim announced legislation to block the incentives offered to Amazon and use the money to buy and cancel student debt. As public advocate, he would introduce similar legislation in the City Council.</p> <p>Opposition to the Amazon deal fits Kim’s thematic messaging for his campaign, he’ll even be on the self-created “People Over Corporations” ballot line on Feb. 26, which includes that push to cancel student debt and promoting local small businesses. The mailer describes the deal as a corporate giveaway and calls for investment in the MTA, schools, and affordable housing instead of the billions of incentives in the Amazon deal.</p> <p>The role of public advocate is intentionally flexible in the New York City Charter, but the three duties most often assumed by public advocates are introducing legislation in the City Council, bringing issues to the front of public discourse, and serving as a watchdog of city agencies. It appears there is little the next public advocate can do about the Amazon deal, but the most likely influence would be through applying public pressure on Mayor Bill de Blasio to cancel or make significant changes to the deal.</p> <p>“As the ombudsman for the people of New York City, the Public Advocate has a strong bully pulpit which I will use to convince (both publicly and privately) my colleagues in government to reject the Amazon HQ2 deal,” said Kim.</p> <p>The public advocate election to be held next month will have a large field of candidates. Twenty-three hopefuls <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8201-23-candidates-submit-petitions-to-get-on-february-26-public-advocate-ballot" target="_blank" rel="noopener">submitted</a> the required 3,750 signatures to the New York City Board of Elections by the Monday deadline. Also running are Queens City Council Member Eric Ulrich, Assemblymembers Daniel O’Donnell of Manhattan and Latrice Walker of Brooklyn, former Obama and Clinton administration attorney Dawn Smalls, and journalist and activist Nomiki Konst, among many others.</p> <p>With competitors trying to set themselves apart, Kim clearly sees Amazon opposition as a winning part of the strategy. Asked about how many mailers his campaign sent, where they were sent, and how much was spent on them, he only said, “I sent the mailer to a broad universe of likely voters across New York City.”</p> <p>Two names noticeably did not appear on the mailer: Mayor Bill de Blasio and Governor Andrew Cuomo, the leaders of negotiations with Amazon executives who held a joint celebratory November press conference to announce the deal. De Blasio and Cuomo were immediately and loudly criticized for the deal by a number of elected officials and activists, though they also got some praise and the only public poll on it shows a mixed bag, but with more support than not. The criticism stemmed from the lack of transparency and oversight involved in the process, the incentives involved, Amazon’s business practices, and the potential impact on local housing prices and infrastructure.</p> <p>“Both were wrong to offer $3 billion in taxpayer handouts to Amazon instead of funding MTA reconstruction, affordable housing development, programs to fight climate change or a whole host of other priorities,” said Kim, when asked about omitting de Blasio and Cuomo from the mailer. “But neither the Governor nor the Mayor are running for Public Advocate.”</p> <p>

***
by Truman Stephens, Gotham Gazette

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Max & Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Michael Blake 2019-01-16T05:00:00+00:00 2019-01-16T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8204-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-michael-blake Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette,&nbsp;and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>January 16, 2019 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Michael Blake<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/michael-blake-277px.jpg" alt="michael blake 277px" width="145" height="167" style="margin: 10px; float: left;" />Michael Blake is a member of the state Assembly from the Bronx and a candidate in the special election to become the next New York City Public Advocate, which will take place February 26. Blake, who worked in the Obama administration, joined the show to discuss his platform of "jobs and justice" and the approach he would take the role of Public Advocate, as well as his path to victory and more.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax </a>and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a>. You can listen to the show through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts, under "Max &amp; Murphy," and listen to Max &amp; Murphy live on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/560142411&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="185" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette,&nbsp;and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>January 16, 2019 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Michael Blake<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/michael-blake-277px.jpg" alt="michael blake 277px" width="145" height="167" style="margin: 10px; float: left;" />Michael Blake is a member of the state Assembly from the Bronx and a candidate in the special election to become the next New York City Public Advocate, which will take place February 26. Blake, who worked in the Obama administration, joined the show to discuss his platform of "jobs and justice" and the approach he would take the role of Public Advocate, as well as his path to victory and more.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax </a>and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a>. You can listen to the show through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts, under "Max &amp; Murphy," and listen to Max &amp; Murphy live on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/560142411&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="185" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Max & Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Danny O'Donnell 2019-01-16T05:00:00+00:00 2019-01-16T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8205-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-danny-o-donnell Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette,&nbsp;and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>January 16, 2019 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Danny O'Donnell<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/danny-odonnell-277b.jpg" alt="danny odonnell 277b" width="130" height="150" style="margin: 10px; float: left;" />Danny O'Donnell is a member of the state Assembly from Manhattan and a candidate for New York City Public Advocate in the special election set to take place February 26. O'Donnell joined the show to discuss his career in the Assembly and his campaign for Public Advocate, what sets him apart from the competition and his path to victory.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax </a>and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a>. You can listen to the show through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts, under "Max &amp; Murphy," and listen to Max &amp; Murphy live on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/560143533&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="185" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette,&nbsp;and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>January 16, 2019 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Danny O'Donnell<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/danny-odonnell-277b.jpg" alt="danny odonnell 277b" width="130" height="150" style="margin: 10px; float: left;" />Danny O'Donnell is a member of the state Assembly from Manhattan and a candidate for New York City Public Advocate in the special election set to take place February 26. O'Donnell joined the show to discuss his career in the Assembly and his campaign for Public Advocate, what sets him apart from the competition and his path to victory.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax </a>and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a>. You can listen to the show through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts, under "Max &amp; Murphy," and listen to Max &amp; Murphy live on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/560143533&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="185" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Max & Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Dawn Smalls 2019-01-16T05:00:00+00:00 2019-01-16T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8206-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-dawn-smalls Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette,&nbsp;and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>January 16, 2019 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Dawn Smalls<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/dawn-smalls-org.jpg" alt="dawn smalls org" width="150" height="150" style="margin: 10px; float: left;" />Dawn Smalls is an attorney who worked in the Clinton and Obama presidential administrations and, running in the special election to become New York City Public Advocate, a first-time candidate. She joined the show to discuss her resume, why she decided to run for office for the first time, her campaign for Public Advocate, the importance of having at least one woman in citywide office, and how she would run the office if elected.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax </a>and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a>. You can listen to the show through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts, under "Max &amp; Murphy," and listen to Max &amp; Murphy live on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/560145258&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="185" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette,&nbsp;and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>January 16, 2019 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Dawn Smalls<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/dawn-smalls-org.jpg" alt="dawn smalls org" width="150" height="150" style="margin: 10px; float: left;" />Dawn Smalls is an attorney who worked in the Clinton and Obama presidential administrations and, running in the special election to become New York City Public Advocate, a first-time candidate. She joined the show to discuss her resume, why she decided to run for office for the first time, her campaign for Public Advocate, the importance of having at least one woman in citywide office, and how she would run the office if elected.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax </a>and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a>. You can listen to the show through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts, under "Max &amp; Murphy," and listen to Max &amp; Murphy live on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/560145258&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="185" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
23 Candidates Submit Petitions to Get on February 26 Public Advocate Ballot 2019-01-15T05:00:00+00:00 2019-01-15T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8201-23-candidates-submit-petitions-to-get-on-february-26-public-advocate-ballot Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/first-ave-marathon.jpg" alt="first ave marathon" width="600" height="401" /></p> <p>(Photo: Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office)</p> <hr /> <p>The field of candidates running for public advocate in the special election scheduled for February 26 remains massive after 23 candidates submitted ballot petition signatures to the New York City Board of Elections by a Monday deadline to get on the ballot.</p> <p>Candidates were required to submit a minimum of 3,750 signatures though many of them went far beyond the requirement with some submitting more than 10,000. What remains to be seen is how many challenges are filed against certain candidates’ petitions in an effort to disqualify those hopefuls from the race and the results of those challenges. Four candidates are already facing objections to their petitions -- Melissa Mark-Viverito, Rafael Espinal, Ron Kim, and Danniel Maio -- though the details of those objections are not available. Candidates have <a href="http://vote.nyc.ny.us/downloads/pdf/documents/boe/PublicNotices/Adopted_Preliminary_Calendar_for_Ind_Nom_Pets_for_NYC_Public_Adocate_for_the_Feb_26_2019_Sp_Elec_01-04-2019.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">till Thursday</a> to file objections.</p> <p>The special election is nonpartisan, with each candidate creating their own party line that cannot resemble an existing political party. Here are the 23 candidates who submitted ballot petition signatures, with their party lines, in order of appearance on the Board of Elections’ ledger:</p> <p>1) Melissa Mark-Viverito (Fix the MTA), former speaker of the New York City Council<br /> 2) Michael Blake (For The People), state Assembly member from the Bronx<br /> 3) Dawn Smalls (No More Delays), attorney who formerly served in Clinton and Obama presidential administrations<br /> 4) Eric Ulrich (Common Sense), New York City Council member from Queens<br /> 5) Daniel O'Donnell (Equality For All), state Assembly member from Manhattan<br /> 6) Latrice Walker (People For Walker), state Assembly member from Brooklyn<br /> 7) Rafael Espinal (Livable City), New York City Council member from Brooklyn<br /> 8) Jumaane Williams (The People's Voice), New York City Council member from Brooklyn<br /> 9) Ron Kim (People Over Corporations), state Assembly member from Queens<br /> 10) Ydanis Rodriguez (UNITED FOR IMMIGRANTS), New York City Council member from Manhattan<br /> 11) Danniel S. Maio (I Like Maio), mapmaker and former congressional candidate<br /> 12) Gary Popkin (Liberal), libertarian and retired professor <br /> 13) Benjamin Yee (COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT), entrepreneur and activist<br /> 14) Ifeoma Ike (People Over Profit), community activist<br /> 15) Manny Alicandro (Better Leadership), attorney<br /> 16) Michael Zumbluskas (FIX MTA &amp; NYCHA NOW), Reform Party leader<br /> 17) David Eisenbach (Stop REBNY), history professor at Columbia University and 2017 candidate for public advocate<br /> 18) Nomiki Konst (Pay People More), journalist and activist<br /> 19) Jared Rich (Jared Rich For NYC), attorney<br /> 20) Anthony Herbert (Housing Residents First), community activist<br /> 21) Walter Iwachiw (I4panyc), perennial candidate for elected office<br /> 22) Theo Chino (Courage To Change), Bitcoin entrepreneur<br /> 23) Helal Sheikh (Friends Of Helal), former City Council candidate</p> <p>[Read: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8175-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-public-advocate-special-election" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Everything You Need to Know About the Special Election for Public Advocate</a>]</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/first-ave-marathon.jpg" alt="first ave marathon" width="600" height="401" /></p> <p>(Photo: Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office)</p> <hr /> <p>The field of candidates running for public advocate in the special election scheduled for February 26 remains massive after 23 candidates submitted ballot petition signatures to the New York City Board of Elections by a Monday deadline to get on the ballot.</p> <p>Candidates were required to submit a minimum of 3,750 signatures though many of them went far beyond the requirement with some submitting more than 10,000. What remains to be seen is how many challenges are filed against certain candidates’ petitions in an effort to disqualify those hopefuls from the race and the results of those challenges. Four candidates are already facing objections to their petitions -- Melissa Mark-Viverito, Rafael Espinal, Ron Kim, and Danniel Maio -- though the details of those objections are not available. Candidates have <a href="http://vote.nyc.ny.us/downloads/pdf/documents/boe/PublicNotices/Adopted_Preliminary_Calendar_for_Ind_Nom_Pets_for_NYC_Public_Adocate_for_the_Feb_26_2019_Sp_Elec_01-04-2019.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">till Thursday</a> to file objections.</p> <p>The special election is nonpartisan, with each candidate creating their own party line that cannot resemble an existing political party. Here are the 23 candidates who submitted ballot petition signatures, with their party lines, in order of appearance on the Board of Elections’ ledger:</p> <p>1) Melissa Mark-Viverito (Fix the MTA), former speaker of the New York City Council<br /> 2) Michael Blake (For The People), state Assembly member from the Bronx<br /> 3) Dawn Smalls (No More Delays), attorney who formerly served in Clinton and Obama presidential administrations<br /> 4) Eric Ulrich (Common Sense), New York City Council member from Queens<br /> 5) Daniel O'Donnell (Equality For All), state Assembly member from Manhattan<br /> 6) Latrice Walker (People For Walker), state Assembly member from Brooklyn<br /> 7) Rafael Espinal (Livable City), New York City Council member from Brooklyn<br /> 8) Jumaane Williams (The People's Voice), New York City Council member from Brooklyn<br /> 9) Ron Kim (People Over Corporations), state Assembly member from Queens<br /> 10) Ydanis Rodriguez (UNITED FOR IMMIGRANTS), New York City Council member from Manhattan<br /> 11) Danniel S. Maio (I Like Maio), mapmaker and former congressional candidate<br /> 12) Gary Popkin (Liberal), libertarian and retired professor <br /> 13) Benjamin Yee (COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT), entrepreneur and activist<br /> 14) Ifeoma Ike (People Over Profit), community activist<br /> 15) Manny Alicandro (Better Leadership), attorney<br /> 16) Michael Zumbluskas (FIX MTA &amp; NYCHA NOW), Reform Party leader<br /> 17) David Eisenbach (Stop REBNY), history professor at Columbia University and 2017 candidate for public advocate<br /> 18) Nomiki Konst (Pay People More), journalist and activist<br /> 19) Jared Rich (Jared Rich For NYC), attorney<br /> 20) Anthony Herbert (Housing Residents First), community activist<br /> 21) Walter Iwachiw (I4panyc), perennial candidate for elected office<br /> 22) Theo Chino (Courage To Change), Bitcoin entrepreneur<br /> 23) Helal Sheikh (Friends Of Helal), former City Council candidate</p> <p>[Read: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8175-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-public-advocate-special-election" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Everything You Need to Know About the Special Election for Public Advocate</a>]</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Public Advocate Election Makes Case for Instant Runoff Voting 2019-01-13T05:00:00+00:00 2019-01-13T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/130-opinion/8196-public-advocate-election-makes-case-for-instant-runoff-voting Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/elec-apoll.jpg" alt="elec apoll" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p>(photo: Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p>If the 2018 election cycle is any indication, voter turnout is on the rise. Now is the time to take advantage of this moment to keep voters engaged in the electoral system and really give them a voice.</p> <p>One of the best ideas for promoting more diverse, open, and democratic elections is instant runoff voting (IRV). In New York City primaries, runoffs are forced for citywide elected positions when votes are split and no one candidate receives more than 40 percent of the vote. With IRV, voters rank candidates in order of preference. If no candidate wins with a first choice majority of 50 percent, the lowest vote-getters are eliminated, and the ballots where they were selected first are added to the next choice among the candidates advancing to the next round of the instant runoff. And so on, until one candidate hits 50 percent.</p> <p>In 2013 – the last time a runoff was held, in the Democratic primary for Public Advocate – it resulted in an additional multi-million dollar election and a drastic decline in voter turnout to just 6.9 percent. And runoff elections are often made up of an older, whiter, and wealthier electorate. This is no way to run an election. Nor is accepting city leaders being elected with a low percentage of votes that negate the votes of the majority.</p> <p>Given the recent election of Letitia James to the office of Attorney General, the public advocate is now vacant. More than 20 people have declared their candidacies, a list that seems to have grown daily for weeks. If the actual number of candidates on the February 26 ballot is anywhere close to 15 or 20, this special election we will likely see votes widely split among the candidates, ensuring that no one will win a majority of the vote. And while there would be no runoff based on city law (there are no runoffs in special elections), this election could nonetheless be a poster child in the case for instant runoff voting, which is also known as ranked-choice voting, giving more voters an actual say in choosing the next public advocate.</p> <p>It should be noted that there will be another public advocate election this fall, where another crowded field could lead to a runoff, to fill out the rest of James’ term through the end of 2021. The winner of the special election is assured the office for the rest of this year only.</p> <p>We will also have a environment in 2021 where ranked-choice voting will be essential. The races for mayor and comptroller are all but certain to be open, with no incumbent, and there will be another public advocate race, not to mention races for all five borough presidencies and all of the City Council. Those 2021 City Council elections, in which 36 current members are term-limited and all 51 seats up for election, will see a flood of candidates. Many races, especially the Democratic primaries, could see four, five, six, or even more candidates. Winners of a number of races may only have a plurality of the votes, unless we enact ranked-choice voting. And the citywide races could feature runoffs unless we act smartly in advance.</p> <p>In 2018, the mayoral Charter Revision Commission reviewed policies that would make our city a better functioning democracy, among them, IRV. Despite widespread support, <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7912-mayoral-charter-revision-commission-puts-three-questions-on-november-ballot" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the commission bucked on the opportunity to put IRV on the ballot</a>. It is disappointing that the commission missed this chance. Despite this, we have other avenues in which to institute IRV.</p> <p>This session in Albany, I will be looking at how we can implement IRV through state legislation, engaging with my colleagues in both the Assembly and the Senate on why this policy is beneficial not only in saving taxpayer money, but also in helping us to elect candidates more representative of the city we live in, including more women and more people of color.</p> <p>The 2018 Charter Commission’s failure to fully address IRV creates opportunity for action in Albany, and I expect to see people from all political sides coalesce around IRV as we move beyond whether or not it is a good idea to how, where, and when to implement it.</p> <p>Instant runoff voting is used in major cities, such as San Francisco, Oakland, and Minneapolis, and this year Maine became the first state in the country to use it for congressional elections. We have allowed other states and cities to take the lead on smart and innovative voter reform while New York has stood by.</p> <p>We are a city and state that often considers ourselves to be on the front lines of progressivism, but on voting reform, we often fall short. We should capitalize on the opportunities we have now going into future elections to ensure that all voices are heard and New York City and State stand up for democracy.</p> <p>***<br />Walter Mosley is a member of the New York State Assembly representing Brooklyn neighborhoods including Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, Prospect Heights, and parts of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant. On Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/WalterTMosley" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@WalterTMosley</a>.</p> <p>

***
Have an op-ed idea or submission for Gotham Gazette? Email opinion@gothamgazette.com

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/elec-apoll.jpg" alt="elec apoll" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p>(photo: Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p>If the 2018 election cycle is any indication, voter turnout is on the rise. Now is the time to take advantage of this moment to keep voters engaged in the electoral system and really give them a voice.</p> <p>One of the best ideas for promoting more diverse, open, and democratic elections is instant runoff voting (IRV). In New York City primaries, runoffs are forced for citywide elected positions when votes are split and no one candidate receives more than 40 percent of the vote. With IRV, voters rank candidates in order of preference. If no candidate wins with a first choice majority of 50 percent, the lowest vote-getters are eliminated, and the ballots where they were selected first are added to the next choice among the candidates advancing to the next round of the instant runoff. And so on, until one candidate hits 50 percent.</p> <p>In 2013 – the last time a runoff was held, in the Democratic primary for Public Advocate – it resulted in an additional multi-million dollar election and a drastic decline in voter turnout to just 6.9 percent. And runoff elections are often made up of an older, whiter, and wealthier electorate. This is no way to run an election. Nor is accepting city leaders being elected with a low percentage of votes that negate the votes of the majority.</p> <p>Given the recent election of Letitia James to the office of Attorney General, the public advocate is now vacant. More than 20 people have declared their candidacies, a list that seems to have grown daily for weeks. If the actual number of candidates on the February 26 ballot is anywhere close to 15 or 20, this special election we will likely see votes widely split among the candidates, ensuring that no one will win a majority of the vote. And while there would be no runoff based on city law (there are no runoffs in special elections), this election could nonetheless be a poster child in the case for instant runoff voting, which is also known as ranked-choice voting, giving more voters an actual say in choosing the next public advocate.</p> <p>It should be noted that there will be another public advocate election this fall, where another crowded field could lead to a runoff, to fill out the rest of James’ term through the end of 2021. The winner of the special election is assured the office for the rest of this year only.</p> <p>We will also have a environment in 2021 where ranked-choice voting will be essential. The races for mayor and comptroller are all but certain to be open, with no incumbent, and there will be another public advocate race, not to mention races for all five borough presidencies and all of the City Council. Those 2021 City Council elections, in which 36 current members are term-limited and all 51 seats up for election, will see a flood of candidates. Many races, especially the Democratic primaries, could see four, five, six, or even more candidates. Winners of a number of races may only have a plurality of the votes, unless we enact ranked-choice voting. And the citywide races could feature runoffs unless we act smartly in advance.</p> <p>In 2018, the mayoral Charter Revision Commission reviewed policies that would make our city a better functioning democracy, among them, IRV. Despite widespread support, <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7912-mayoral-charter-revision-commission-puts-three-questions-on-november-ballot" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the commission bucked on the opportunity to put IRV on the ballot</a>. It is disappointing that the commission missed this chance. Despite this, we have other avenues in which to institute IRV.</p> <p>This session in Albany, I will be looking at how we can implement IRV through state legislation, engaging with my colleagues in both the Assembly and the Senate on why this policy is beneficial not only in saving taxpayer money, but also in helping us to elect candidates more representative of the city we live in, including more women and more people of color.</p> <p>The 2018 Charter Commission’s failure to fully address IRV creates opportunity for action in Albany, and I expect to see people from all political sides coalesce around IRV as we move beyond whether or not it is a good idea to how, where, and when to implement it.</p> <p>Instant runoff voting is used in major cities, such as San Francisco, Oakland, and Minneapolis, and this year Maine became the first state in the country to use it for congressional elections. We have allowed other states and cities to take the lead on smart and innovative voter reform while New York has stood by.</p> <p>We are a city and state that often considers ourselves to be on the front lines of progressivism, but on voting reform, we often fall short. We should capitalize on the opportunities we have now going into future elections to ensure that all voices are heard and New York City and State stand up for democracy.</p> <p>***<br />Walter Mosley is a member of the New York State Assembly representing Brooklyn neighborhoods including Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, Prospect Heights, and parts of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant. On Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/WalterTMosley" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@WalterTMosley</a>.</p> <p>

***
Have an op-ed idea or submission for Gotham Gazette? Email opinion@gothamgazette.com

</p>
Max & Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Eric Ulrich 2019-01-09T05:00:00+00:00 2019-01-09T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8187-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-eric-ulrich Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette,&nbsp;and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>January 9, 2019 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Eric Ulrich<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/eric-ulrich-january-9.jpg" alt="eric ulrich january 9" width="130" height="184" style="margin-right: 10px; float: left;" />City Council Member Eric Ulrich, a self-described "moderate" and "Rockefeller" Republican in the mold of former Mayor Michael Bloomberg, is running for New York City Public Advocate in the special election set for February 26. Ulrich, who represents parts of Queens, joined the show to discuss his candidacy and argue why he is the candidate best-qualified to hold Mayor Bill de Blasio accountable as public advocate.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax </a>and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a>. You can listen to the show through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts, under "Max &amp; Murphy," and listen to Max &amp; Murphy live on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/556599174&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="185" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette,&nbsp;and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>January 9, 2019 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Eric Ulrich<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2019/podcast19/eric-ulrich-january-9.jpg" alt="eric ulrich january 9" width="130" height="184" style="margin-right: 10px; float: left;" />City Council Member Eric Ulrich, a self-described "moderate" and "Rockefeller" Republican in the mold of former Mayor Michael Bloomberg, is running for New York City Public Advocate in the special election set for February 26. Ulrich, who represents parts of Queens, joined the show to discuss his candidacy and argue why he is the candidate best-qualified to hold Mayor Bill de Blasio accountable as public advocate.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax </a>and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a>. You can listen to the show through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts, under "Max &amp; Murphy," and listen to Max &amp; Murphy live on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/556599174&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="185" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Everything You Need to Know About the Special Election for Public Advocate 2019-01-03T05:00:00+00:00 2019-01-03T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8175-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-public-advocate-special-election Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/ballot-tish.jpg" alt="ballot tish" width="600" height="374" /></p> <p>Tish James voting (photo via Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p><em>Updated as of January 18.</em></p> <p>Next month, New Yorkers will have the opportunity to cast a ballot for a new public advocate in the first-ever special election for a citywide office. The current vacancy was created when the most recent officeholder, Letitia James, was officially sworn in as the state’s attorney general, a position she won in the November general election.</p> <p>The public advocate is the people’s representative, a watchdog and ombudsperson, with a post that has little direct influence over city policy but a strong bully pulpit from which proposals can be made, grievances can be amplified, and the mayor and the rest of local government can be held to account. The office is charged with hearing complaints from New Yorkers about city services and can investigate the work of city agencies though with limited ability to enforce reforms. The office holder can also introduce legislation in the City Council but cannot cast a vote.</p> <p>The special election to fill one of just three popularly-elected citywide positions has a crowded field and a short timeline. Here’s what you need to know.</p> <p><strong>When is the election?</strong><br /> Mayor Bill de Blasio officially proclaimed on January 2 that the election would be held on Tuesday, February 26.</p> <p><strong>Who is running?</strong><br />There are 23&nbsp;candidates&nbsp;who have filed petition signatures with the New York City Board of Elections to get on the ballot, but it is possible that not all of them will qualify. Once the mayor signed the city proclamation, the many candidates had 12 days to collect the 3,750 petition signatures they needed to get on the ballot. Signatures can come from any registered voter in the city, and many candidates pursued far more than the minimum required in order to protect themselves from challenges of invalid signatures.</p> <p>Special elections in New York are nonpartisan -- no candidate can run on an existing party line like that of the Democratic or Republican Party -- and each candidate has created their own ballot line that is not supposed to resemble another political party’s name. Another quirk in the system is that ballot position is decided by the order in which petition signatures are submitted, which made the mad scramble to get on the ballot that much more frantic. &nbsp;</p> <p>The number of candidates, even in a narrowed field, could test the limits of modern ballot design since half a dozen sitting and former New York City Council members, several State Assembly members, and a number of activists and others outside of government are running. They include former City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, who submitted her petition signatures first and will likely be at the top of the ballot; sitting City Council Members Jumaane Williams, Rafael Espinal, Ydanis Rodriguez, and Eric Ulrich, the lone Republican office-holder in the race; Assemblymembers Michael Blake, Latrice Walker, Ron Kim, and Daniel O’Donnell; activist and journalist Nomiki Konst; Columbia University professor David Eisenbach, who ran against James in the 2017 Democratic primary for public advocate; attorney Dawn Smalls; entrepreneur Benjamin Yee; and consultant Ifeoma Ike; <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8136-declared-or-exploring-candidates-for-new-york-city-public-advocate" target="_blank" rel="noopener">among others</a>.</p> <p>The actual field will become much clearer once petition challenges have been ruled on by the Board of Elections -- four candidates are already being challenged -- whereby candidates can have their ballot access denied due to faulty petitions. Candidates often file suit to get other candidates kicked off on technicalities -- something as small as a missing cover sheet on a petition can ensure that a candidate does not qualify.</p> <p><strong>How much campaign cash can they raise and spend?</strong><br /> Along with his announcement of the date of the special election, the mayor also signed into law a bill sponsored by Council Member Ben Kallos that immediately puts into effect new campaign finance regulations that were approved by voters through a ballot referendum in November.</p> <p>The new rules allow candidates to choose between two tiers of participation in the city’s public matching funds program, administered by the New York City Campaign Finance Board, which monitors campaign fundraising and spending. The program currently gives participating candidates a 6-to-1 match for the first $175 of every campaign contribution. Those who choose to abide by these old rules would be limited to a maximum campaign donation of $2,550, and can receive a maximum of $2.5 million in public funds.</p> <p>The second, new tier allows candidates to opt for a $1,000 contribution limit and receive an 8-to-1 match in public funds for the first $250 of each contribution, allowing them to receive up to $3.4 million in public funds. To receive public funds, a candidate would have to meet the dual threshold of raising a total of $62,500 from at least 500 individual contributors.</p> <p>Those that choose to participate in the public funds program will have to abide by a $4.5 million spending limit, though any candidate is unlikely to reach that astronomical number in just seven weeks. They will also have to complete a mandatory campaign finance training at the CFB.</p> <p>The first campaign finance disclosure deadline passed on January 15, with several candidates showing strong <a href="https://www.nyccfb.info/VSApps/WebForm_Finance_Summary.aspx?as_election_cycle=2019A&amp;sm=press_12&amp;sm=press_12" target="_blank" rel="noopener">fundraising numbers</a>. The next disclosure deadline is January 25.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Will the candidates debate?</strong><br /> Many of the candidates have already appeared and are regularly appearing at a series of public forums and debates organized by advocacy groups, political clubs, and others to lay out their platforms and positions on specific policies. But there will also be two official debates organized by the CFB. The first debate will be held February 6 and the second one is scheduled for February 20. Both will be broadcast by Spectrum News NY1, and livestreamed on NY1's website and Facebook page.&nbsp;</p> <p>To qualify for the first debate, candidates will have to raise and spend at least $56,938 by January 21, the campaign finance disclosure deadline just prior to the debate. The second debate, for “leading contenders” will have greater thresholds -- candidates will have to raise and spend $170,813 by February 11, and must be endorsed by a state, local or federal elected official representing New York City, or by a membership organization with 250 members living in the city. The sponsors of the debates include Politico New York, Citizens Union, the League of Women Voters, the Latino Leadership Institute,&nbsp;Borough of Manhattan Community College, NAACP New York State Conference Metropolitan Council, and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., East Kings County Alumnae Chapter.</p> <p>Unlike in the past, the debates will also be simulcast by the city-run NYC Life, making them freely and publicly accessible. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What will the election cost?</strong><br />The New York City Board of Elections estimates that the special election will set the city back at least $15 million, a price that is nearly five times the actual annual budget of the public advocate’s office.</p> <p>But, unlike a regular citywide election, there will be no costly runoff if a candidate does not meet a certain threshold. The candidate with the most votes wins, even if a large field means the winner takes a small percentage of the vote.</p> <p><strong>Who can vote and who will vote?</strong><br /> Every registered voter in the city can vote in the special election but turnout is likely to be low, though it is hard to predict since the city has never held a citywide special election before. New voter registration applications sent by mail must be postmarked no later than February 1 but the BOE will accept in-person applications till 5 pm on February 16.&nbsp;</p> <p>In City Council special elections, turnout tends to be severely depressed owing to several factors -- a lack of awareness of the election, an election date outside of the expected September-November window, voter apathy.</p> <p>In the 2017 election, when James was reelected to a second term, a total of 1.1 million New Yorkers voted for public advocate, only about 22 percent of the total registered voters in the city at that time.</p> <p><strong>Who will win?</strong><br /> Who knows. But, we do know that the winner of the special election will, if he or she wants to keep the office, have to run for reelection in the fall. By city law, there will be a typical set of primary and general elections in September and November to decide the public advocate for the rest of the current four-year term, which runs through the end of 2021. The winner of the special election will only be guaranteed the office through the end of this year.</p> <p>Democratic and/or Republican primaries will be held as needed in September before a November general election. There could also be a run-off if there is a crowded primary or general election field and no candidate earns 40 percent of the vote initially. In 2013, James won the Democratic nomination in a primary run-off before easily winning the general election.</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Note - This article has been updated to include the voter registration deadlines for the special election.</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/ballot-tish.jpg" alt="ballot tish" width="600" height="374" /></p> <p>Tish James voting (photo via Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p><em>Updated as of January 18.</em></p> <p>Next month, New Yorkers will have the opportunity to cast a ballot for a new public advocate in the first-ever special election for a citywide office. The current vacancy was created when the most recent officeholder, Letitia James, was officially sworn in as the state’s attorney general, a position she won in the November general election.</p> <p>The public advocate is the people’s representative, a watchdog and ombudsperson, with a post that has little direct influence over city policy but a strong bully pulpit from which proposals can be made, grievances can be amplified, and the mayor and the rest of local government can be held to account. The office is charged with hearing complaints from New Yorkers about city services and can investigate the work of city agencies though with limited ability to enforce reforms. The office holder can also introduce legislation in the City Council but cannot cast a vote.</p> <p>The special election to fill one of just three popularly-elected citywide positions has a crowded field and a short timeline. Here’s what you need to know.</p> <p><strong>When is the election?</strong><br /> Mayor Bill de Blasio officially proclaimed on January 2 that the election would be held on Tuesday, February 26.</p> <p><strong>Who is running?</strong><br />There are 23&nbsp;candidates&nbsp;who have filed petition signatures with the New York City Board of Elections to get on the ballot, but it is possible that not all of them will qualify. Once the mayor signed the city proclamation, the many candidates had 12 days to collect the 3,750 petition signatures they needed to get on the ballot. Signatures can come from any registered voter in the city, and many candidates pursued far more than the minimum required in order to protect themselves from challenges of invalid signatures.</p> <p>Special elections in New York are nonpartisan -- no candidate can run on an existing party line like that of the Democratic or Republican Party -- and each candidate has created their own ballot line that is not supposed to resemble another political party’s name. Another quirk in the system is that ballot position is decided by the order in which petition signatures are submitted, which made the mad scramble to get on the ballot that much more frantic. &nbsp;</p> <p>The number of candidates, even in a narrowed field, could test the limits of modern ballot design since half a dozen sitting and former New York City Council members, several State Assembly members, and a number of activists and others outside of government are running. They include former City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, who submitted her petition signatures first and will likely be at the top of the ballot; sitting City Council Members Jumaane Williams, Rafael Espinal, Ydanis Rodriguez, and Eric Ulrich, the lone Republican office-holder in the race; Assemblymembers Michael Blake, Latrice Walker, Ron Kim, and Daniel O’Donnell; activist and journalist Nomiki Konst; Columbia University professor David Eisenbach, who ran against James in the 2017 Democratic primary for public advocate; attorney Dawn Smalls; entrepreneur Benjamin Yee; and consultant Ifeoma Ike; <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8136-declared-or-exploring-candidates-for-new-york-city-public-advocate" target="_blank" rel="noopener">among others</a>.</p> <p>The actual field will become much clearer once petition challenges have been ruled on by the Board of Elections -- four candidates are already being challenged -- whereby candidates can have their ballot access denied due to faulty petitions. Candidates often file suit to get other candidates kicked off on technicalities -- something as small as a missing cover sheet on a petition can ensure that a candidate does not qualify.</p> <p><strong>How much campaign cash can they raise and spend?</strong><br /> Along with his announcement of the date of the special election, the mayor also signed into law a bill sponsored by Council Member Ben Kallos that immediately puts into effect new campaign finance regulations that were approved by voters through a ballot referendum in November.</p> <p>The new rules allow candidates to choose between two tiers of participation in the city’s public matching funds program, administered by the New York City Campaign Finance Board, which monitors campaign fundraising and spending. The program currently gives participating candidates a 6-to-1 match for the first $175 of every campaign contribution. Those who choose to abide by these old rules would be limited to a maximum campaign donation of $2,550, and can receive a maximum of $2.5 million in public funds.</p> <p>The second, new tier allows candidates to opt for a $1,000 contribution limit and receive an 8-to-1 match in public funds for the first $250 of each contribution, allowing them to receive up to $3.4 million in public funds. To receive public funds, a candidate would have to meet the dual threshold of raising a total of $62,500 from at least 500 individual contributors.</p> <p>Those that choose to participate in the public funds program will have to abide by a $4.5 million spending limit, though any candidate is unlikely to reach that astronomical number in just seven weeks. They will also have to complete a mandatory campaign finance training at the CFB.</p> <p>The first campaign finance disclosure deadline passed on January 15, with several candidates showing strong <a href="https://www.nyccfb.info/VSApps/WebForm_Finance_Summary.aspx?as_election_cycle=2019A&amp;sm=press_12&amp;sm=press_12" target="_blank" rel="noopener">fundraising numbers</a>. The next disclosure deadline is January 25.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Will the candidates debate?</strong><br /> Many of the candidates have already appeared and are regularly appearing at a series of public forums and debates organized by advocacy groups, political clubs, and others to lay out their platforms and positions on specific policies. But there will also be two official debates organized by the CFB. The first debate will be held February 6 and the second one is scheduled for February 20. Both will be broadcast by Spectrum News NY1, and livestreamed on NY1's website and Facebook page.&nbsp;</p> <p>To qualify for the first debate, candidates will have to raise and spend at least $56,938 by January 21, the campaign finance disclosure deadline just prior to the debate. The second debate, for “leading contenders” will have greater thresholds -- candidates will have to raise and spend $170,813 by February 11, and must be endorsed by a state, local or federal elected official representing New York City, or by a membership organization with 250 members living in the city. The sponsors of the debates include Politico New York, Citizens Union, the League of Women Voters, the Latino Leadership Institute,&nbsp;Borough of Manhattan Community College, NAACP New York State Conference Metropolitan Council, and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., East Kings County Alumnae Chapter.</p> <p>Unlike in the past, the debates will also be simulcast by the city-run NYC Life, making them freely and publicly accessible. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What will the election cost?</strong><br />The New York City Board of Elections estimates that the special election will set the city back at least $15 million, a price that is nearly five times the actual annual budget of the public advocate’s office.</p> <p>But, unlike a regular citywide election, there will be no costly runoff if a candidate does not meet a certain threshold. The candidate with the most votes wins, even if a large field means the winner takes a small percentage of the vote.</p> <p><strong>Who can vote and who will vote?</strong><br /> Every registered voter in the city can vote in the special election but turnout is likely to be low, though it is hard to predict since the city has never held a citywide special election before. New voter registration applications sent by mail must be postmarked no later than February 1 but the BOE will accept in-person applications till 5 pm on February 16.&nbsp;</p> <p>In City Council special elections, turnout tends to be severely depressed owing to several factors -- a lack of awareness of the election, an election date outside of the expected September-November window, voter apathy.</p> <p>In the 2017 election, when James was reelected to a second term, a total of 1.1 million New Yorkers voted for public advocate, only about 22 percent of the total registered voters in the city at that time.</p> <p><strong>Who will win?</strong><br /> Who knows. But, we do know that the winner of the special election will, if he or she wants to keep the office, have to run for reelection in the fall. By city law, there will be a typical set of primary and general elections in September and November to decide the public advocate for the rest of the current four-year term, which runs through the end of 2021. The winner of the special election will only be guaranteed the office through the end of this year.</p> <p>Democratic and/or Republican primaries will be held as needed in September before a November general election. There could also be a run-off if there is a crowded primary or general election field and no candidate earns 40 percent of the vote initially. In 2013, James won the Democratic nomination in a primary run-off before easily winning the general election.</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Note - This article has been updated to include the voter registration deadlines for the special election.</p>
Max & Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Rafael Espinal 2019-01-02T05:00:00+00:00 2019-01-02T05:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8173-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-rafael-espinal Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette,&nbsp;and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>January 2, 2019 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Rafael Espinal<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/rafael-espinal-1-2-wbai-inset.jpg" alt="rafael espinal 1 2 wbai inset" width="150" height="170" style="margin: 10px; float: left;" />City Council Member Rafael Espinal, a Brooklyn Democrat, is among the candidates running in the special election to become the next New York City Public Advocate. With the election set for Tuesday, February 26, it's a sprint for candidates to craft their messages, collect ballot petition signatures, raise money, reach voters, and secure support. Espinal joined the show to discuss his candidacy, including his record in the City Council and his vision for the role of Public Advocate. He explained he's running on the "Livable City" ballot line in the non-partisan special election, and why, and much more.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax </a>and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a>. You can listen to the show through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts, under "Max &amp; Murphy," and listen to Max &amp; Murphy live on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/553274799&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="185" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette,&nbsp;and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>January 2, 2019 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Public Advocate Candidate Rafael Espinal<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/rafael-espinal-1-2-wbai-inset.jpg" alt="rafael espinal 1 2 wbai inset" width="150" height="170" style="margin: 10px; float: left;" />City Council Member Rafael Espinal, a Brooklyn Democrat, is among the candidates running in the special election to become the next New York City Public Advocate. With the election set for Tuesday, February 26, it's a sprint for candidates to craft their messages, collect ballot petition signatures, raise money, reach voters, and secure support. Espinal joined the show to discuss his candidacy, including his record in the City Council and his vision for the role of Public Advocate. He explained he's running on the "Livable City" ballot line in the non-partisan special election, and why, and much more.</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax </a>and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a>. You can listen to the show through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts, under "Max &amp; Murphy," and listen to Max &amp; Murphy live on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. on WBAI radio, 99.5FM or wbai.org</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/553274799&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="185" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>