Gotham Gazette Gotham Gazette is an online publication covering New York policy and politics as well as news on public safety, transportation, education, finance and more. http://www.gothamgazette.com/component/tags/tag/eric-adams 2018-11-16T22:39:11+00:00 Webmaster webmaster@gothamgazette.com Prominent Elected Officials Oppose De Blasio Charter Revision Proposals 2018-10-29T04:00:00+00:00 2018-10-29T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8026-prominent-elected-officials-oppose-de-blasio-charter-revision-proposals Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/27811376699_c0b0d6b3ca_z.jpg" alt="Mayor de Blasio " width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>Mayor de Blasio (photo: Benjamin Kanter/Mayor's Office)</p> <hr /> <p>Mayor Bill de Blasio is seeking to make a lasting impact on city governance through a charter revision commission that would transform the city’s campaign finance system, promote greater civic involvement in city affairs, and inject new blood into local community boards. But prominent elected officials, most of whom are Democrats like de Blasio, don’t agree with the proposals the mayor’s commission has put on the November 6 ballot and are urging New Yorkers to reject them.</p> <p>The mayor’s commission put <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/charter/downloads/pdf/2018_charter_revision_commission_ballot_proposals_1_pdf.PDF" target="_blank" rel="noopener">three questions</a> on the ballot for voter approval through a simple majority. The first would significantly reduce individual campaign contribution limits and expand the city’s public matching funds program; the second would create a civic engagement commission with appointments mostly by the mayor to coordinate citywide participatory budgeting and other initiatives such as interpreting services at polling sites; and the third would impose term limits on community board members and alter how those members are recruited and appointed to ensure greater diversity.</p> <p>Though the mayor appointed the commission and announced its areas of focus, he was not to have direct say over its final report or proposals, but he did announce support for all three and is now campaigning to see them approved by voters.</p> <p>“These reforms will go a long way toward strengthening our democracy and limiting the influence of big money in our elections,” he said in a September statement, when the proposals were released. “There's no doubt in my mind that these measures will help us build a more fair and equitable city.” <a href="https://www.politico.com/states/new-york/city-hall/story/2018/10/28/de-blasio-stumps-for-his-ballot-initiatives-667543" target="_blank" rel="noopener">On Sunday</a>, de Blasio spoke at two churches in Manhattan, urging congregants to flip their ballot and decide on the three questions. “[V]ote yes, yes, yes. So we can open up the doors of democracy wide and make this an even greater city,” he said at Bethel Gospel Assembly.</p> <p>Other elected officials, however, are not so certain, and are expressing somewhat mixed reviews, though many are opposed to community board term limits.</p> <p>City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, for instance, supports lowering contribution limits and creating a civic engagement commission, but not term limits for community board members. “I don’t think term limits are necessary,” Johnson, a former community boar chair, said in a statement to Gotham Gazette. “These aren’t lifetime appointments. They must be reappointed by elected officials who are term limited. I think that provides enough checks and balances to our community boards, while allowing us to keep the good members with experience and wisdom. It is also our job as elected officials to always be looking to appoint new civic minded leaders who are interested in serving.”</p> <p>It’s an argument that’s also been advanced by four of the five borough presidents -- only Brooklyn’s Eric Adams supports the term limits question.</p> <p>Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, in fact, led the creation of an independent expenditure committee to oppose both term limits and the civic engagement commission, an effort in which she was joined by Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr., Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, and Staten Island Borough President James Oddo (Oddo is the lone Republican in the group). “These proposals would be a real—and in some cases dangerous—disruption to the way Community Boards protect our communities,” Brewer wrote in an email to supporters earlier this month, arguing that it could lead to a drain in institutional wisdom and give real estate interests and lobbyists a leg up in discussions about community development. The proposal does include a provision whereby individuals term-limited off of community boards are eligible to serve again after a one-term, two-year “cooling off period.”</p> <p>“Our community boards are the eyes and ears of our neighborhoods and are often the first line of defense against unwanted projects as well as the initial point of contact between city agencies and our neighbors,” said Diaz Jr. “We should be working to strengthen their role, not strip them of the knowledge and historical focus that makes them so important in the first place.”</p> <p>Katz said the current appointment process allows “ample opportunity” to pick diverse candidates “for a dynamic mix of talent,” while Oddo worried that the “one-size-fits-all solution” could have unintended consequences.</p> <p>Adams, however, has argued, “While institutional knowledge is valuable, a reasonable term limit for Community Board members will allow the best of both worlds: institutional knowledge and new voices.”</p> <p>On expanding the campaign finance system, however, only Adams and Oddo have publicly opposed the question among the borough presidents, though for different reasons. “[Brooklyn BP Adams] opposes the campaign finance reform measure because it doesn’t go far enough as he believes in 100 percent public financing,” said an Adams spokesperson. Oddo, on the other hand, has been a staunch opponent of public financing and simply said, “Hell no!” about proposal one.</p> <p>Spokespeople for Katz and Diaz Jr. did not respond to requests for comment about the campaign finance reform proposal.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">[Read: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8000-brewer-creates-committee-to-oppose-charter-revision-proposals" target="_blank">Brewer Creates Committee to Oppose Charter Revision Proposals</a>]</p> <p>Comptroller Scott Stringer also opposes the second and third questions while supporting the first on campaign finance reform. “The City must take a serious look at our Charter — it’s critical to tackling the important issues facing New Yorkers,” he said in a statement. Stringer has laid out his own exhaustive plan of charter proposals to the 2019 charter commission, a separate one from the mayor’s that was created through City Council legislation that is taking a far broader look at the city’s governing principles.&nbsp;</p> <p>Stringer added, “I support the first initiative because we need a campaign finance system that does everything it can to engage New Yorkers and help people run for office. I oppose proposals 2 and 3 which will weaken communities’ voices in shaping their own development.”</p> <p>At an October 31 news conference at City Hall, Gotham Gazette asked Speaker Johnson if he would urge the 2019 commission to reverse community board term limits if they should pass. Johnson said he would not. "I think it's important to lice by the will of the voters," he said. &nbsp;</p> <p>A spokesperson for Public Advocate Letitia James did not provide her stances despite multiple requests for comment, one of which was acknowledged.</p> <p>Among a few rank-and-file City Council Members, reception of the proposals seems to be mixed. Council Member Brad Lander, a Brooklyn Democrat, for example, supports all three proposals and has in particular been advocating for the creation of the civic engagement commission -- Lander had proposed the idea through legislation and presented it to the commission.</p> <p>“I truly believe these ballot proposals give us an opportunity to do something important to strengthen our local democracy: To improve our campaign finance rules. To turbo-charge civic engagement. To expand participatory budgeting city-wide,” he said in an email blast to supporters, calling on New Yorkers to pledge their support.</p> <p>Manhattan Council Member Ben Kallos, also a Democrat, is backing all the proposals as well. Kallos has been a staunch campaign finance reform advocate and the first question would partially achieve what he has in the past tried to do through legislation, to expand the amount of public funds given to candidates running for office. “Democracy in New York City will finally get better,” he said in a September 6 statement, if the first question is passed, “reducing contribution limits and making small dollars more valuable by matching more of them with a greater multiplier.”</p> <p>City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer, a Queens Democrat, is also <a href="https://twitter.com/JimmyVanBramer/status/1057284940314918913" target="_blank" rel="noopener">urging a "yes" vote</a> on all three proposals. City Council Member Jumaane Williams, a Brooklyn Democrat, has expressed support for the campaign finance proposal, but a spokesperson did not respond to a request for his positions on the other two.</p> <p>On the other end, there’s Council Member Helen Rosenthal, again a Manhattan Democrat, who opposes all three measures. “The spirit of the first two proposals is positive and some of the substance is even promising, but each raises significant concerns to the point where I cannot support them,” she said in a statement to Gotham Gazette. Also noting a criticism that was raised when the mayor first announced his commission, she added, “Of course, all three proposals could be implemented through the current legislative process.”</p> <p>Even government reform groups appear somewhat split on the ballot proposals. Reinvent Albany is advocating for all three. “Reinvent Albany believes a YES vote on these ballot measures will collectively amplify the voice of everyday New Yorkers and create new opportunities for injecting fresh perspectives into the public debate over how to make our city better for everyone,” the group said in an email blast on Monday.</p> <p>Citizens Union, another good government advocacy organization <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/ny-pol-citizens-union-charter-revision-questions-20181024-story.html">opposes</a> the proposal for a civic engagement commission, supports community board term limits, and has not taken a position on the campaign finance question.</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, Senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Note - This article has been updated with additional comment from City Council Speaker Corey Johnson and Council Members Jimmy Van Bramer and Jumaane Williams. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/27811376699_c0b0d6b3ca_z.jpg" alt="Mayor de Blasio " width="600" height="400" /></p> <p>Mayor de Blasio (photo: Benjamin Kanter/Mayor's Office)</p> <hr /> <p>Mayor Bill de Blasio is seeking to make a lasting impact on city governance through a charter revision commission that would transform the city’s campaign finance system, promote greater civic involvement in city affairs, and inject new blood into local community boards. But prominent elected officials, most of whom are Democrats like de Blasio, don’t agree with the proposals the mayor’s commission has put on the November 6 ballot and are urging New Yorkers to reject them.</p> <p>The mayor’s commission put <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/charter/downloads/pdf/2018_charter_revision_commission_ballot_proposals_1_pdf.PDF" target="_blank" rel="noopener">three questions</a> on the ballot for voter approval through a simple majority. The first would significantly reduce individual campaign contribution limits and expand the city’s public matching funds program; the second would create a civic engagement commission with appointments mostly by the mayor to coordinate citywide participatory budgeting and other initiatives such as interpreting services at polling sites; and the third would impose term limits on community board members and alter how those members are recruited and appointed to ensure greater diversity.</p> <p>Though the mayor appointed the commission and announced its areas of focus, he was not to have direct say over its final report or proposals, but he did announce support for all three and is now campaigning to see them approved by voters.</p> <p>“These reforms will go a long way toward strengthening our democracy and limiting the influence of big money in our elections,” he said in a September statement, when the proposals were released. “There's no doubt in my mind that these measures will help us build a more fair and equitable city.” <a href="https://www.politico.com/states/new-york/city-hall/story/2018/10/28/de-blasio-stumps-for-his-ballot-initiatives-667543" target="_blank" rel="noopener">On Sunday</a>, de Blasio spoke at two churches in Manhattan, urging congregants to flip their ballot and decide on the three questions. “[V]ote yes, yes, yes. So we can open up the doors of democracy wide and make this an even greater city,” he said at Bethel Gospel Assembly.</p> <p>Other elected officials, however, are not so certain, and are expressing somewhat mixed reviews, though many are opposed to community board term limits.</p> <p>City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, for instance, supports lowering contribution limits and creating a civic engagement commission, but not term limits for community board members. “I don’t think term limits are necessary,” Johnson, a former community boar chair, said in a statement to Gotham Gazette. “These aren’t lifetime appointments. They must be reappointed by elected officials who are term limited. I think that provides enough checks and balances to our community boards, while allowing us to keep the good members with experience and wisdom. It is also our job as elected officials to always be looking to appoint new civic minded leaders who are interested in serving.”</p> <p>It’s an argument that’s also been advanced by four of the five borough presidents -- only Brooklyn’s Eric Adams supports the term limits question.</p> <p>Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, in fact, led the creation of an independent expenditure committee to oppose both term limits and the civic engagement commission, an effort in which she was joined by Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr., Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, and Staten Island Borough President James Oddo (Oddo is the lone Republican in the group). “These proposals would be a real—and in some cases dangerous—disruption to the way Community Boards protect our communities,” Brewer wrote in an email to supporters earlier this month, arguing that it could lead to a drain in institutional wisdom and give real estate interests and lobbyists a leg up in discussions about community development. The proposal does include a provision whereby individuals term-limited off of community boards are eligible to serve again after a one-term, two-year “cooling off period.”</p> <p>“Our community boards are the eyes and ears of our neighborhoods and are often the first line of defense against unwanted projects as well as the initial point of contact between city agencies and our neighbors,” said Diaz Jr. “We should be working to strengthen their role, not strip them of the knowledge and historical focus that makes them so important in the first place.”</p> <p>Katz said the current appointment process allows “ample opportunity” to pick diverse candidates “for a dynamic mix of talent,” while Oddo worried that the “one-size-fits-all solution” could have unintended consequences.</p> <p>Adams, however, has argued, “While institutional knowledge is valuable, a reasonable term limit for Community Board members will allow the best of both worlds: institutional knowledge and new voices.”</p> <p>On expanding the campaign finance system, however, only Adams and Oddo have publicly opposed the question among the borough presidents, though for different reasons. “[Brooklyn BP Adams] opposes the campaign finance reform measure because it doesn’t go far enough as he believes in 100 percent public financing,” said an Adams spokesperson. Oddo, on the other hand, has been a staunch opponent of public financing and simply said, “Hell no!” about proposal one.</p> <p>Spokespeople for Katz and Diaz Jr. did not respond to requests for comment about the campaign finance reform proposal.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">[Read: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8000-brewer-creates-committee-to-oppose-charter-revision-proposals" target="_blank">Brewer Creates Committee to Oppose Charter Revision Proposals</a>]</p> <p>Comptroller Scott Stringer also opposes the second and third questions while supporting the first on campaign finance reform. “The City must take a serious look at our Charter — it’s critical to tackling the important issues facing New Yorkers,” he said in a statement. Stringer has laid out his own exhaustive plan of charter proposals to the 2019 charter commission, a separate one from the mayor’s that was created through City Council legislation that is taking a far broader look at the city’s governing principles.&nbsp;</p> <p>Stringer added, “I support the first initiative because we need a campaign finance system that does everything it can to engage New Yorkers and help people run for office. I oppose proposals 2 and 3 which will weaken communities’ voices in shaping their own development.”</p> <p>At an October 31 news conference at City Hall, Gotham Gazette asked Speaker Johnson if he would urge the 2019 commission to reverse community board term limits if they should pass. Johnson said he would not. "I think it's important to lice by the will of the voters," he said. &nbsp;</p> <p>A spokesperson for Public Advocate Letitia James did not provide her stances despite multiple requests for comment, one of which was acknowledged.</p> <p>Among a few rank-and-file City Council Members, reception of the proposals seems to be mixed. Council Member Brad Lander, a Brooklyn Democrat, for example, supports all three proposals and has in particular been advocating for the creation of the civic engagement commission -- Lander had proposed the idea through legislation and presented it to the commission.</p> <p>“I truly believe these ballot proposals give us an opportunity to do something important to strengthen our local democracy: To improve our campaign finance rules. To turbo-charge civic engagement. To expand participatory budgeting city-wide,” he said in an email blast to supporters, calling on New Yorkers to pledge their support.</p> <p>Manhattan Council Member Ben Kallos, also a Democrat, is backing all the proposals as well. Kallos has been a staunch campaign finance reform advocate and the first question would partially achieve what he has in the past tried to do through legislation, to expand the amount of public funds given to candidates running for office. “Democracy in New York City will finally get better,” he said in a September 6 statement, if the first question is passed, “reducing contribution limits and making small dollars more valuable by matching more of them with a greater multiplier.”</p> <p>City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer, a Queens Democrat, is also <a href="https://twitter.com/JimmyVanBramer/status/1057284940314918913" target="_blank" rel="noopener">urging a "yes" vote</a> on all three proposals. City Council Member Jumaane Williams, a Brooklyn Democrat, has expressed support for the campaign finance proposal, but a spokesperson did not respond to a request for his positions on the other two.</p> <p>On the other end, there’s Council Member Helen Rosenthal, again a Manhattan Democrat, who opposes all three measures. “The spirit of the first two proposals is positive and some of the substance is even promising, but each raises significant concerns to the point where I cannot support them,” she said in a statement to Gotham Gazette. Also noting a criticism that was raised when the mayor first announced his commission, she added, “Of course, all three proposals could be implemented through the current legislative process.”</p> <p>Even government reform groups appear somewhat split on the ballot proposals. Reinvent Albany is advocating for all three. “Reinvent Albany believes a YES vote on these ballot measures will collectively amplify the voice of everyday New Yorkers and create new opportunities for injecting fresh perspectives into the public debate over how to make our city better for everyone,” the group said in an email blast on Monday.</p> <p>Citizens Union, another good government advocacy organization <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/ny-pol-citizens-union-charter-revision-questions-20181024-story.html">opposes</a> the proposal for a civic engagement commission, supports community board term limits, and has not taken a position on the campaign finance question.</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, Senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Note - This article has been updated with additional comment from City Council Speaker Corey Johnson and Council Members Jimmy Van Bramer and Jumaane Williams. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
Brewer Creates Committee to Oppose Charter Revision Proposals 2018-10-16T04:00:00+00:00 2018-10-16T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8000-brewer-creates-committee-to-oppose-charter-revision-proposals Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/brewer_de_blasio_bill_signing.jpg" alt="brewer de blasio bill signing" width="600" height="398" /></p> <p>Mayor de Blasio &amp; BP Brewer (photo: Brewer's office)</p> <hr /> <p>Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer is forming an independent expenditure committee to try to defeat two public referenda on the November general election ballot that would impose term limits on community board members and create a new citywide civic engagement agency under the control of the mayor’s office.</p> <p>Last month, the charter revision commission created by Mayor Bill de Blasio approved three ballot questions to present to voters on November 6. The first would significantly reduce campaign contribution limits and make small but significant enhancements to the Campaign Finance Board’s public matching funds program, which incentivizes small-dollar fundraising. Brewer has not taken a position on that proposal.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">[Read: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7912-mayoral-charter-revision-commission-puts-three-questions-on-november-ballot" target="_blank">Mayoral Charter Revision Commission Puts Three Questions on November Ballot]</a></p> <p>On the other two questions, however, the Manhattan borough president is ardently opposed, and is mobilizing people and money to persuade New York City voters to defeat them.</p> <p>Question two creates a centralized Civic Engagement Commission, with a majority of members appointed by the mayor, to coordinate citywide efforts on participatory budgeting, community engagement, and to provide technical assistance to the city’s 59 community boards.</p> <p>Question three, the most controversial of the proposals, would limit the number of terms community board members can serve while also reforming the recruitment and appointment process that borough presidents use to fill board rosters.</p> <p>Brewer insists both those questions are misguided, and is forming a committee called “Vote No on 2 &amp; 3” to campaign against them.&nbsp;</p> <p>“These proposals would be a real—and in some cases dangerous—disruption to the way Community Boards protect our communities,” she wrote in an email blast to supporters from her personal email account, soliciting funds for the incipient committee and urging recipients to spread the word. (Elected officials are not allowed to advocate for or against ballot proposals in their official capacity under state law and per guidance from the Conflicts of Interest Board.)</p> <p>Though the committee does not yet seem to be registered with the state Board of Elections, a sign-up web page declares that it is “an official NYS independent expenditure committee, made up of volunteers, some belonging to Community Boards and some not, who think Proposals 2 &amp; 3 are bad news for neighborhoods and a giveaway to developers and City Hall.” Asked for clarification, a spokesperson for the committee did not respond.</p> <p>Brewer argues, as have other opponents, that community board term limits would lead to a brain drain of experienced and engaged community board members to the benefit of lobbyists and developers looking to exploit communities without facing pushback. In particular, she said, community board members with know-how on complicated land use and zoning issues would be kicked out.</p> <p>“It would have the effect of allowing developers and their lawyers—who are never term limited!—to dominate development negotiations, because those long-time members will be gone,” Brewer wrote. “And on long-term city projects like street redesign or sustainability, newly-appointed community board members would have little influence over long-term projects. Every Board’s institutional memory would be wiped out.”</p> <p>In a statement, Matt Gewolb, executive director of the charter commission, emphasized the testimony received from across the five boroughs, urging the commission to make community boards more diverse, reflective of the neighborhoods they serve, and to give them additional resources. “The Commission's proposals are designed in response to this community input,” he said. “As the Commission has described in its reports, the proposal seeks to strike a reasonable balance between retaining valuable institutional knowledge and providing opportunities for new voices to have a seat at the table.”</p> <p>Brewer, however, insisted that the proposal is “redundant” since the borough presidents and City Council members that apppoint community board members are themselves limited to serving two terms each. She also took issue with the proposed duties that the Civic Engagement Commission would have in assisting community boards, seeing it as an encroachment on the powers of the borough presidents who currently perform those roles.</p> <p>The Manhattan borough president isn’t alone in her opposition. Of the five borough presidents, only Brooklyn’s Eric Adams has come out in support of community board term limits, which supporters say would diversify the boards, providing more representation for younger people and people of color. The other three -- Ruben Diaz Jr. in the Bronx, Melinda Katz in Queens, and Staten Island’s James Oddo -- all oppose the second and third questions.</p> <p>In a statement through a spokesperson, Adams said, “This is what democracy is all about. I applaud my colleague and friend Borough President Brewer for making her voice heard.”</p> <p>Brewer ended her appeal by urging supporters to vote against the two proposals and also to testify against them at several forums scheduled over the next week by the charter commission to educate voters. Last month, she also took her message to the 2019 charter revision commission, urging it to reverse the mayor’s commission’s proposals if they are approved by voters. “Community Boards are our first line of offense in promoting neighborhood planning and our first line of defense in protecting neighborhoods from developers who seek only maximum profit from their work in our communities,” she said at the September 27 hearing of the commission that will put proposals on next year’s general election ballot, and on which she appointed one member as part of a process created by legislation she and Public Advocate Letitia James moved through the City Council.</p> <p>Asked last week about the possibility that the 2019 commission could negate the mayor’s commission’s work, mayoral spokesperson Seth Stein said in an email, “We’re not going to predict what the Council Commission will do, and will review any proposals.”</p> <p style="text-align: center;">[Read:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7912-mayoral-charter-revision-commission-puts-three-questions-on-november-ballot">Mayoral Charter Revision Commission Puts Three Questions on November Ballot]</a></p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, Senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Note - this article has been updated.&nbsp;</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/brewer_de_blasio_bill_signing.jpg" alt="brewer de blasio bill signing" width="600" height="398" /></p> <p>Mayor de Blasio &amp; BP Brewer (photo: Brewer's office)</p> <hr /> <p>Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer is forming an independent expenditure committee to try to defeat two public referenda on the November general election ballot that would impose term limits on community board members and create a new citywide civic engagement agency under the control of the mayor’s office.</p> <p>Last month, the charter revision commission created by Mayor Bill de Blasio approved three ballot questions to present to voters on November 6. The first would significantly reduce campaign contribution limits and make small but significant enhancements to the Campaign Finance Board’s public matching funds program, which incentivizes small-dollar fundraising. Brewer has not taken a position on that proposal.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">[Read: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7912-mayoral-charter-revision-commission-puts-three-questions-on-november-ballot" target="_blank">Mayoral Charter Revision Commission Puts Three Questions on November Ballot]</a></p> <p>On the other two questions, however, the Manhattan borough president is ardently opposed, and is mobilizing people and money to persuade New York City voters to defeat them.</p> <p>Question two creates a centralized Civic Engagement Commission, with a majority of members appointed by the mayor, to coordinate citywide efforts on participatory budgeting, community engagement, and to provide technical assistance to the city’s 59 community boards.</p> <p>Question three, the most controversial of the proposals, would limit the number of terms community board members can serve while also reforming the recruitment and appointment process that borough presidents use to fill board rosters.</p> <p>Brewer insists both those questions are misguided, and is forming a committee called “Vote No on 2 &amp; 3” to campaign against them.&nbsp;</p> <p>“These proposals would be a real—and in some cases dangerous—disruption to the way Community Boards protect our communities,” she wrote in an email blast to supporters from her personal email account, soliciting funds for the incipient committee and urging recipients to spread the word. (Elected officials are not allowed to advocate for or against ballot proposals in their official capacity under state law and per guidance from the Conflicts of Interest Board.)</p> <p>Though the committee does not yet seem to be registered with the state Board of Elections, a sign-up web page declares that it is “an official NYS independent expenditure committee, made up of volunteers, some belonging to Community Boards and some not, who think Proposals 2 &amp; 3 are bad news for neighborhoods and a giveaway to developers and City Hall.” Asked for clarification, a spokesperson for the committee did not respond.</p> <p>Brewer argues, as have other opponents, that community board term limits would lead to a brain drain of experienced and engaged community board members to the benefit of lobbyists and developers looking to exploit communities without facing pushback. In particular, she said, community board members with know-how on complicated land use and zoning issues would be kicked out.</p> <p>“It would have the effect of allowing developers and their lawyers—who are never term limited!—to dominate development negotiations, because those long-time members will be gone,” Brewer wrote. “And on long-term city projects like street redesign or sustainability, newly-appointed community board members would have little influence over long-term projects. Every Board’s institutional memory would be wiped out.”</p> <p>In a statement, Matt Gewolb, executive director of the charter commission, emphasized the testimony received from across the five boroughs, urging the commission to make community boards more diverse, reflective of the neighborhoods they serve, and to give them additional resources. “The Commission's proposals are designed in response to this community input,” he said. “As the Commission has described in its reports, the proposal seeks to strike a reasonable balance between retaining valuable institutional knowledge and providing opportunities for new voices to have a seat at the table.”</p> <p>Brewer, however, insisted that the proposal is “redundant” since the borough presidents and City Council members that apppoint community board members are themselves limited to serving two terms each. She also took issue with the proposed duties that the Civic Engagement Commission would have in assisting community boards, seeing it as an encroachment on the powers of the borough presidents who currently perform those roles.</p> <p>The Manhattan borough president isn’t alone in her opposition. Of the five borough presidents, only Brooklyn’s Eric Adams has come out in support of community board term limits, which supporters say would diversify the boards, providing more representation for younger people and people of color. The other three -- Ruben Diaz Jr. in the Bronx, Melinda Katz in Queens, and Staten Island’s James Oddo -- all oppose the second and third questions.</p> <p>In a statement through a spokesperson, Adams said, “This is what democracy is all about. I applaud my colleague and friend Borough President Brewer for making her voice heard.”</p> <p>Brewer ended her appeal by urging supporters to vote against the two proposals and also to testify against them at several forums scheduled over the next week by the charter commission to educate voters. Last month, she also took her message to the 2019 charter revision commission, urging it to reverse the mayor’s commission’s proposals if they are approved by voters. “Community Boards are our first line of offense in promoting neighborhood planning and our first line of defense in protecting neighborhoods from developers who seek only maximum profit from their work in our communities,” she said at the September 27 hearing of the commission that will put proposals on next year’s general election ballot, and on which she appointed one member as part of a process created by legislation she and Public Advocate Letitia James moved through the City Council.</p> <p>Asked last week about the possibility that the 2019 commission could negate the mayor’s commission’s work, mayoral spokesperson Seth Stein said in an email, “We’re not going to predict what the Council Commission will do, and will review any proposals.”</p> <p style="text-align: center;">[Read:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7912-mayoral-charter-revision-commission-puts-three-questions-on-november-ballot">Mayoral Charter Revision Commission Puts Three Questions on November Ballot]</a></p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, Senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Note - this article has been updated.&nbsp;</p>
As Senator Faces Tough Primary, He’s Spending $1 Million in Public Funds from Brooklyn Borough President 2018-08-14T00:34:43+00:00 2018-08-14T00:34:43+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7862-adams-allocates-1-million-in-government-funding-as-hamilton-attempts-to-fend-off-primary-challenger Samar Khurshid <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/cd2a0nexeaa1wgl.jpg" alt="cd2a0nexeaa1wgl" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p>Senator Jesse Hamilton with Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, center (photo: @BPEricAdams)</p> <hr /> <p>Amid a heated Democratic primary race in central Brooklyn’s state Senate District 20, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams is making $1 million of government money available for spending in the district through a process run by Senator Jesse Hamilton, his handpicked, newly-embattled successor in the state Legislature.</p> <p>Hamilton is a former member of the Independent Democratic Conference, a group of eight Democratic state senators who formed a coalition with the Senate Republican conference from 2011 to earlier this year, bolstering the Republicans’ slim legislative majority in the upper house of the state Legislature. After being elected to replace Adams in the Senate in 2014, just after Adams was elected borough president the year before, Hamilton <a href="https://www.politico.com/states/new-york/albany/story/2016/11/jesse-hamilton-promises-to-join-senates-idc-107172" target="_blank" rel="noopener">announced</a> he was joining the IDC in November 2016 right before being reelected.</p> <p>Now, this election year, every former IDC member faces a progressive primary challenger, with the votes set for September 13. Hamilton’s challenger, Zellnor Myrie, is receiving widespread institutional support, including the recent <a href="https://www.politico.com/states/new-york/city-hall/story/2018/08/09/members-of-congress-back-myrie-citing-hamiltons-idc-allegiance-551855" target="_blank" rel="noopener">endorsements</a> of four Brooklyn members of Congress—Yvette Clarke, Nydia Velázquez, Jerry Nadler, and Hakeem Jeffries—and Mayor Bill de Blasio, among others. Adams, though, seems firmly in support of Hamilton: campaign finance records show that he donated $5,000 on January 12, 2018, to Friends of Jesse Hamilton, the senator’s election committee, though Adams has not yet offered a formal endorsement of his protege.</p> <p>The two have a long-lasting and well-documented relationship. Adams represented District 20, which includes parts of Brownsville, Crown Heights, Park Slope, and East Flatbush, in the state Senate for four terms, from 2006 until just after his election to the borough presidency in late 2013. After Adams vacated his seat, Hamilton, then an attorney and elected district leader, competed against Department of Education administrator Rubain Dorancy in a 2014 race widely seen at the time as a proxy battle between Adams, supporting Hamilton, and Hakeem Jeffries, who’d backed Dorancy.</p> <p>After Hamilton won the nomination to the seat by a wide margin, Adams <a href="https://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/37/37/dtg-20-senate-primary-2014-09-12-bk_37_37.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">reportedly shouted</a> at a victory party, “We showed them who the real kingmaker in Brooklyn is.”</p> <p>The two have partnered frequently since Hamilton’s election, the senator’s director of communications Ean Fullerton told Gotham Gazette in an email, pointing to past immigration forums, health fairs, and cultural events in Brooklyn.</p> <p>Two terms and four years after his succession of Adams, Hamilton is again battling for his party’s nomination in Senate District 20, after no Democrat contested his renomination in 2016. Concurrently, he is asking his constituents how they’d like to spend the $1 million that Adams recently funded for participatory budgeting in Senate District 20. The borough president made no such allocation available in any other senate district.</p> <p>Participatory budgeting is a process that allows constituents to decide how to spend a portion of the public budget. Community members submit proposals for capital projects, like school and park improvements, which are then put to a vote among residents in the relevant geographic area. In New York, this typically occurs in a City Council district—this year, 31 of 51 City Council members participated, using a portion of the capital funding they receive each year through the larger Council budget process—though Adams has taken up participatory budgeting using the funds at his disposal as borough president.</p> <p>In New York City, representatives who opt to participate in participatory budgeting must allocate at least $1 million of their district’s budget to the process. Senate District 20 is the site of the first participatory budgeting conducted by a New York state legislator, a landmark made especially noteworthy by the fact that the funds arrived from a borough president. The timing is also exceptional, given its alignment with the election calendar. The senator’s spokesperson said Hamilton and Adams had discussed a participatory budgeting proposal “some time ago” and have been working to launch it “as soon as we were ready.”</p> <p>“Sen. Hamilton believes this initiative can serve as an example for more state leaders to pursue [participatory budgeting] on the state level,” he added.</p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/ddvioltvaaaad9m.jpg" alt="ddvioltvaaaad9m" width="300" height="388" style="margin: 1px 6px 1px 1px; float: left;" />The process began this past May 22 with an <a href="https://www.nysenate.gov/senators/jesse-hamilton/pb" target="_blank" rel="noopener">announcement</a> from Senator Hamilton’s office that framed the participatory budgeting as “in partnership with Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams.” Proposals were due, atypically, only 12 days later, on June 4, though on that day Hamilton <a href="https://www.facebook.com/SenatorHamilton/photos/a.614103632001276.1073741829.603272233084416/1904328302978796/?type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank" rel="noopener">extended</a> the deadline to June 8. The proposed PB <a href="https://www.nysenate.gov/senators/jesse-hamilton/pb-projects" target="_blank" rel="noopener">projects</a> in District 20 would upgrade school facilities, repave streets and sidewalks, install security cameras, and improve green space in the district. Residents aged 11 and up could vote on the proposals between August 6 and August 12, and Hamilton’s office, in partnership with the Bridge Street Development Corporation, launched a get-out-the-vote effort replete with "mailers to the district, email blasts, robocalls, text messages, flyering at subway stations, and community meetings," according to a handout from a May 23 neighborhood assembly on the topic in Crown Heights.</p> <p>All proposed projects must be located within Senate District 20, and flyers and mailers publicizing the initiative prominently feature Hamilton’s face and name. (They also come alongside a series of other mailers that Hamilton has sent to constituents using state funds allocated to his office for communications with district residents, a perk state legislators have long taken advantage of during election years.)</p> <p>The New York City Charter allows the five borough presidents to allocate funds towards capital projects in their boroughs, and Adams was the first elected official in New York City beyond the City Council to fund participatory budgeting, said Stefan Ringel, Adams’ communications director. Adams has <a href="https://council.nyc.gov/press/2018/06/07/1616/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">funded projects</a> in various Brooklyn Council districts to the tune of $1 million a year for the past three years.</p> <p>Hamilton approached Adams in March 2016&nbsp;about setting up participatory budgeting in his Senate district, Ringel told Gotham Gazette. Adams obliged, doubling his annual allocation of PB funds in the borough to $2 million, setting aside half of that sum for Hamilton’s district, one of nine Senate districts that include at least parts of the borough.</p> <p>Through his communications director, Adams emphasized that the district includes Brownsville, Brooklyn’s poorest neighborhood, where he was born and where he “has committed to reverse decades of underinvestment.”</p> <p>The borough president “would welcome other legislators and agencies who wish to partner on any further expansions,” said Ringel. But, for now, he’s allocated $1 million only to District 20, as insurgency threatens his hand-picked successor there.</p> <p>

***
by Daniel Yadin for Gotham Gazette

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Note - this article has been updated to clarify that Sen. Hamilton is running the participatory budgeting process, not spending the money himself, and that he approached Borough President Adams about participatory budgeting in March 2016, not March 2017. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/cd2a0nexeaa1wgl.jpg" alt="cd2a0nexeaa1wgl" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p>Senator Jesse Hamilton with Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, center (photo: @BPEricAdams)</p> <hr /> <p>Amid a heated Democratic primary race in central Brooklyn’s state Senate District 20, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams is making $1 million of government money available for spending in the district through a process run by Senator Jesse Hamilton, his handpicked, newly-embattled successor in the state Legislature.</p> <p>Hamilton is a former member of the Independent Democratic Conference, a group of eight Democratic state senators who formed a coalition with the Senate Republican conference from 2011 to earlier this year, bolstering the Republicans’ slim legislative majority in the upper house of the state Legislature. After being elected to replace Adams in the Senate in 2014, just after Adams was elected borough president the year before, Hamilton <a href="https://www.politico.com/states/new-york/albany/story/2016/11/jesse-hamilton-promises-to-join-senates-idc-107172" target="_blank" rel="noopener">announced</a> he was joining the IDC in November 2016 right before being reelected.</p> <p>Now, this election year, every former IDC member faces a progressive primary challenger, with the votes set for September 13. Hamilton’s challenger, Zellnor Myrie, is receiving widespread institutional support, including the recent <a href="https://www.politico.com/states/new-york/city-hall/story/2018/08/09/members-of-congress-back-myrie-citing-hamiltons-idc-allegiance-551855" target="_blank" rel="noopener">endorsements</a> of four Brooklyn members of Congress—Yvette Clarke, Nydia Velázquez, Jerry Nadler, and Hakeem Jeffries—and Mayor Bill de Blasio, among others. Adams, though, seems firmly in support of Hamilton: campaign finance records show that he donated $5,000 on January 12, 2018, to Friends of Jesse Hamilton, the senator’s election committee, though Adams has not yet offered a formal endorsement of his protege.</p> <p>The two have a long-lasting and well-documented relationship. Adams represented District 20, which includes parts of Brownsville, Crown Heights, Park Slope, and East Flatbush, in the state Senate for four terms, from 2006 until just after his election to the borough presidency in late 2013. After Adams vacated his seat, Hamilton, then an attorney and elected district leader, competed against Department of Education administrator Rubain Dorancy in a 2014 race widely seen at the time as a proxy battle between Adams, supporting Hamilton, and Hakeem Jeffries, who’d backed Dorancy.</p> <p>After Hamilton won the nomination to the seat by a wide margin, Adams <a href="https://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/37/37/dtg-20-senate-primary-2014-09-12-bk_37_37.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">reportedly shouted</a> at a victory party, “We showed them who the real kingmaker in Brooklyn is.”</p> <p>The two have partnered frequently since Hamilton’s election, the senator’s director of communications Ean Fullerton told Gotham Gazette in an email, pointing to past immigration forums, health fairs, and cultural events in Brooklyn.</p> <p>Two terms and four years after his succession of Adams, Hamilton is again battling for his party’s nomination in Senate District 20, after no Democrat contested his renomination in 2016. Concurrently, he is asking his constituents how they’d like to spend the $1 million that Adams recently funded for participatory budgeting in Senate District 20. The borough president made no such allocation available in any other senate district.</p> <p>Participatory budgeting is a process that allows constituents to decide how to spend a portion of the public budget. Community members submit proposals for capital projects, like school and park improvements, which are then put to a vote among residents in the relevant geographic area. In New York, this typically occurs in a City Council district—this year, 31 of 51 City Council members participated, using a portion of the capital funding they receive each year through the larger Council budget process—though Adams has taken up participatory budgeting using the funds at his disposal as borough president.</p> <p>In New York City, representatives who opt to participate in participatory budgeting must allocate at least $1 million of their district’s budget to the process. Senate District 20 is the site of the first participatory budgeting conducted by a New York state legislator, a landmark made especially noteworthy by the fact that the funds arrived from a borough president. The timing is also exceptional, given its alignment with the election calendar. The senator’s spokesperson said Hamilton and Adams had discussed a participatory budgeting proposal “some time ago” and have been working to launch it “as soon as we were ready.”</p> <p>“Sen. Hamilton believes this initiative can serve as an example for more state leaders to pursue [participatory budgeting] on the state level,” he added.</p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/ddvioltvaaaad9m.jpg" alt="ddvioltvaaaad9m" width="300" height="388" style="margin: 1px 6px 1px 1px; float: left;" />The process began this past May 22 with an <a href="https://www.nysenate.gov/senators/jesse-hamilton/pb" target="_blank" rel="noopener">announcement</a> from Senator Hamilton’s office that framed the participatory budgeting as “in partnership with Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams.” Proposals were due, atypically, only 12 days later, on June 4, though on that day Hamilton <a href="https://www.facebook.com/SenatorHamilton/photos/a.614103632001276.1073741829.603272233084416/1904328302978796/?type=3&amp;theater" target="_blank" rel="noopener">extended</a> the deadline to June 8. The proposed PB <a href="https://www.nysenate.gov/senators/jesse-hamilton/pb-projects" target="_blank" rel="noopener">projects</a> in District 20 would upgrade school facilities, repave streets and sidewalks, install security cameras, and improve green space in the district. Residents aged 11 and up could vote on the proposals between August 6 and August 12, and Hamilton’s office, in partnership with the Bridge Street Development Corporation, launched a get-out-the-vote effort replete with "mailers to the district, email blasts, robocalls, text messages, flyering at subway stations, and community meetings," according to a handout from a May 23 neighborhood assembly on the topic in Crown Heights.</p> <p>All proposed projects must be located within Senate District 20, and flyers and mailers publicizing the initiative prominently feature Hamilton’s face and name. (They also come alongside a series of other mailers that Hamilton has sent to constituents using state funds allocated to his office for communications with district residents, a perk state legislators have long taken advantage of during election years.)</p> <p>The New York City Charter allows the five borough presidents to allocate funds towards capital projects in their boroughs, and Adams was the first elected official in New York City beyond the City Council to fund participatory budgeting, said Stefan Ringel, Adams’ communications director. Adams has <a href="https://council.nyc.gov/press/2018/06/07/1616/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">funded projects</a> in various Brooklyn Council districts to the tune of $1 million a year for the past three years.</p> <p>Hamilton approached Adams in March 2016&nbsp;about setting up participatory budgeting in his Senate district, Ringel told Gotham Gazette. Adams obliged, doubling his annual allocation of PB funds in the borough to $2 million, setting aside half of that sum for Hamilton’s district, one of nine Senate districts that include at least parts of the borough.</p> <p>Through his communications director, Adams emphasized that the district includes Brownsville, Brooklyn’s poorest neighborhood, where he was born and where he “has committed to reverse decades of underinvestment.”</p> <p>The borough president “would welcome other legislators and agencies who wish to partner on any further expansions,” said Ringel. But, for now, he’s allocated $1 million only to District 20, as insurgency threatens his hand-picked successor there.</p> <p>

***
by Daniel Yadin for Gotham Gazette

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p>Note - this article has been updated to clarify that Sen. Hamilton is running the participatory budgeting process, not spending the money himself, and that he approached Borough President Adams about participatory budgeting in March 2016, not March 2017. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
Mayoral Charter Revision Commission Hears Expert Testimony on Campaign Finance Reform 2018-06-15T04:00:00+00:00 2018-06-15T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7744-mayor-charter-revision-commission-hears-expert-testimony-on-campaign-finance-reform Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/charter-comm-rev2.jpg" alt="charter comm rev2" width="600" height="368" /></p> <p>The Charter Revision Commission</p> <hr /> <p>The Charter Revision Commission empaneled by Mayor Bill de Blasio met on Thursday at NYU for the second of four <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7705-mayoral-charter-revision-commission-announces-preliminary-agenda" target="_blank" rel="noopener">expert advisory issue forums</a>, discussing what could be the marquee issue for this year’s commission: changing the city’s campaign finance system. The first meeting, held Tuesday, <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7733-mayoral-charter-revision-commission-hears-expert-testimony-on-voting-and-elections" target="_blank" rel="noopener">focused on voting and election reform</a>.</p> <p>Like the first hearing, Thursday’s saw the commission hear from invited experts on the topic at hand, and was broken into two sections. For campaign finance, the first panel discussed context and perspective of the city’s system from politicians and experts, and the second provided recommendations.</p> <p>The commission, consisting of 15 members appointed by de Blasio, including Chair Cesar Perales, will finalize a list of proposed changes to the city Charter by early September that will then appear on the general election ballot in November for voters to approve or disapprove.</p> <p>Representatives from the city’s nonpartisan Campaign Finance Board provided five recommendations to the commission for improving the city’s public campaign finance system and its centerpiece, the public matching funds program. The board recommends:</p> <ol> <li dir="ltr"> <p>Lowering individual contribution limits from $5,100 to $2,250 for citywide offices, from $3,950 to $1,750 for boroughwide offices, and from $2,850 to $1,250 for City Council seats.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr"> <p>Increase the matching funds rate from 6-to-1 (for every dollar under $175 raised via an individual contribution, the city disburses $6) to 8-to-1. This would be coupled with an increase of the maximum matchable amount, from $175 to $250.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr"> <p>Increase the cap on public funds as a percentage of a campaign’s total spending limit from 55 percent to 65 percent.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr"> <p>Lower the threshold to qualify for matching funds for citywide races, from $250,000 from 1,000 eligible contributors for mayor and $125,000 from 500 contributors for public advocate and comptroller, to $125,000 and $75,000 respectively with the same number of contributors.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr"> <p>Lower the minimum individual contribution counted toward the public match threshold, from $10 to $5.</p> </li> </ol> <p>Others, including advocates, elected officials, and academics, also provided recommendations to the commission, with some differing from the CFB and others in line with it.</p> <p>The city’s public election financing system, whereby donations to candidates of up to $175 are matched by public dollars at a rate of 6 to 1, has been cited as a model nationwide for placing more power in elections in the hands of the average voter. City Council Member Carlos Menchaca testified to the committee that he never would have been able to mount an insurgent campaign without the system, and that it also allowed him to spend more time with voters rather than donors from out of the district.</p> <p>“What the system allowed me to do was to have a conversation with donors at $5, $10, and my branded experience of $38 for the 38th District, about the campaign finance,” Menchaca said. “That was my beginning part of my conversation with everyone, that their dollars would multiply by six. That allowed folks to feel empowered in a challenger, and for people that were not entrenched in the system, which is where I had to go build my political support, became possible.” Menchaca said his average contribution amount for his 2013 campaign, in which he pulled off the rare feat of unseating an incumbent, was “around $100.”</p> <p>The public matching program came into being in 1989, after a wave of corruption scandals in city, state, and federal government led to the passage of Local Law 8, which established a 1:1 match. The match was increased to 4:1 through the 1998 Charter Revision Commission, and was increased again to the current 6:1 in 2007.</p> <p>The system has significantly lowered candidate reliance on political action committee (PAC) money and other “big money” donations found at other levels of elected government, including state-level elections in New York. The CFB presented data comparing an unnamed City Council member’s finances with that of a member of Congress and of the state Senate. The member of Congress raised 77 percent of their money from PACs and 0.6 percent from small contributions of $200 or less. The state senator raised 89 percent from PACs and 7 percent from small contributions. The City Council member, on the other hand, raised 25 percent from PACs, and 62 percent from small contributions when matching fund allocations were taken into account.</p> <p>However, for citywide offices, the contribution percentages can be a red herring. In 2017, while 73 percent of contributions to mayoral candidates participating in the public match program came from donors who contributed under $175, 45 percent of the actual dollar value of the total contributions came from 650 individuals who donated the maximum for the 2017 election, which was $4,950 (it has since risen automatically, per law, to $5,100). For the City Council, the distribution is more equal, and in fact, Council candidates as a whole received more money in 2017 from small donors than from contributors of the maximum amount allowed by the program.</p> <p>Non-participants in the program can take the form of a rich self-funder like Michael Bloomberg, but can also take the form of an incumbent without serious competition not wanting to use taxpayer funds for a formality election or interested in looser restrictions on their spending. Non-participation in competitive races is fairly rare, though. According to the CFB’s Assistant Executive Director for Public Affairs, Eric Friedman, 28 out of 64 non-participants in the public finance system in 2017 reported raising $0.</p> <p>Others who testified were largely in line with the CFB on raising the match rate and reducing the maximum allowable contribution by about half. Advocates broke with the CFB on the issue of the match cap: while the CFB recommended that the cap be lifted to 65 percent, Alex Camarda of Reinvent Albany and Michael Malbin of SUNY Albany’s Campaign Finance Institute recommended that the cap be eliminated entirely, which would have the city provide more public funds relative to the spending limit.</p> <p>“I don’t see what purpose that serves,” Malbin said of the matching cap. Camarda and Malbin both endorsed raising the rate of matching funds rate above 6-to-1, but did not recommend a specific rate.</p> <p>For the 2021 election, the spending limit for a City Council candidate is set at $190,000, and the maximum public funds disbursement is $104,500, or 55 percent of the spending limit. Eliminating the cap would mean that a candidate could spend up to 85 percent of the spending limit using public funds. City Council Member Ben Kallos recently re-introduced a bill that would eliminate the matching funds cap.</p> <p>CFB representatives were asked by Commissioner Wendy Weiser, director of the Democracy Program at NYU’s Brennan Center, why the board is endorsing a 65 percent cap instead of elimination. CFB Executive Director Amy Loprest said that raising it to 85 percent would be impractical.</p> <p>“We make public funds payments to candidates who are on the ballot and who are opposed on the ballot, therefore we can only make those payments once the ballot has been set,” said Loprest. She noted that according to state election law, ballots could only be set after the end of petitioning. “The ballot is set roughly at the end of July, beginning of August. Which means that we make our first public funds payments at the beginning of August, which leaves about five weeks before the primary.” She noted that this would cause campaigns to be constrained to spending most of their money in the five weeks before the primary.</p> <p>Camarda agreed in part.</p> <p>“I think that in citywide races, 65 percent is plenty because citywide candidates don’t often hit the cap,” he said. “Our concern would be for City Council, because as I mentioned, 30 percent of the candidates in 2013 actually hit the cap.” The CFB stated that it wouldn’t oppose eliminating the cap, but that it was not its first preference.</p> <p>The commissioners, including Chair Perales, a former Secretary of State under Governor Andrew Cuomo, appeared receptive to the changes proposed by the CFB and the other testifiers, for the most part. Most lines of questioning were of an inquisitive rather than adversarial tone. The commissioner who was most skeptical and critical of the proposed changes was John Siegal, an attorney and a de Blasio appointee to the Civilian Complaint Review Board.</p> <p>“The reason, clearly, that mayoral candidates rely more on big contributions is because it takes a lot of money to run an effective mayoral campaign,” said Siegal, who donated $4,500 to de Blasio’s 2013 mayoral campaign. “And while it sounds good and feels good to say ‘let’s lower the contribution limit,’ that is going to have consequences. Candidates are going to have to work way harder to raise money. They’re going to have to spend a lot more time raising money.” He noted that there is an “efficiency to getting on the phone and getting 500 people to give $4,500 or $5,100 that is going to be lost here.”</p> <p>The CFB’s Chair, Frederick Schaffer, said that he would agree with Siegal if the only recommendation made by the Board was to lower the contribution limit.</p> <p>“That’s why we want to increase the match for citywide officials from 6-to-1 to 8-to-1, and increase the actual amount from $175 to $250,” Schaffer said. “We crunched those numbers precisely with this problem in mind, and we think that the overall effect of those three things together meets the concern that you have just expressed.”</p> <p>Siegal was also critical of a proposed “geographical requirement” for citywide candidates, which would force them to fundraise around the city. Malbin’s presentation to the commission noted that most money raised for citywide contests comes from only five City Council districts, representing Manhattan around Central Park and Brownstone Brooklyn. For citywide candidates, Malbin recommended that they must show a minimum number of contributors in 20 of 51 Council districts to qualify for public matching funds. The CFB suggested that citywide candidates raise 50 contributions from each borough.</p> <p>Siegal called this a “fundamentally different requirement than we’ve ever had in the system,” saying that previous campaign finance law was limiting the money candidates can raise rather than explicitly saying who it must be raised from, which he said would set a bad precedent, “engineering campaign fundraising.”</p> <p>“Have you actually looked at how many Republicans raise 50 matching contributions in [the] Bronx? Or how many Democrats actually raise 50 contributions in Staten Island? And do we really want to tell candidates that they have to go out and introduce themselves to communities where they have no background and no ties, and the first thing they have to do is go ask for money. That doesn’t seem to me that it’s getting money out of politics, it seems to me like it’s pushing the fundraising race into places for other reasons,” he added.</p> <p>Schaffer dismissed the notion that 50 contributions per borough was unattainable for a seeker of citywide office.</p> <p>“We’re trying to identify people who are reasonably likely to be real candidates, and so we thought the number 50 was really quite minimal, even for a Democrat in Staten Island or a Republican in the Bronx,” Schaffer said. There are currently three citywide elected offices: Mayor, Public Advocate, and Comptroller.</p> <p>Other commissioners also had questions and concerns. Dale Ho, of the ACLU’s Voting Rights Project, questioned whether it was appropriate to put such specific numbers, limits, and thresholds into the city charter, which he characterized as difficult to change and rarely brought up for debate, versus the easier-to-change city code.</p> <p>“As you can see from all this machinery here, [the charter] is quite difficult to amend,” Ho said. “If it turns out that the number should change over time, maybe the limits need to be reduced even more, maybe the match numbers need to go up even higher, maybe we miscalibrate something and we need to adjust something. If these changes are in the city charter, that kind of ties the hands of the city in a way that if they’re in the code, maybe they’re a little easier to adjust.”</p> <p>Schaffer, a former top appointee in the office of the city’s Corporation Counsel, its top lawyer, said he believed that the City Council can amend the charter “just like ordinary legislation,” which Perales agreed with.</p> <p>Other issues beyond those encompassed by the CFB’s recommendations also arose.</p> <p>Government reform group Citizens Union remained neutral on increasing public funds disbursement to candidates, but gave suggestions for transparency measures if the commission decided to increase the disbursement. Rachel Bloom, Citizens Union’s director of public policy, called on the commission to prohibit public funds disbursed to candidates to be used to pay consultants that also lobby the city, subject candidate coordination with union members to campaign finance regulations, tighten Local Law 181, which regulates the nonprofits of elected officials, restrict the transfer of campaign funds running for one office to another office, and to transfer lobbying reporting and enforcement to the CFB.</p> <p>When asked by Siegal if the CFB was interested in regulating lobbying, Loprest was ambivalent on whether the organization’s independence lent itself to being a watchdog on lobbying.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams advocated for eliminating money from politics entirely and moving to a 100 percent publicly funded system. Adams said that candidacies receiving public funding could be gauged by petition signatures, or by reaching a threshold through $1 donations that would end up in the public finance system. He also suggested that the members of the commission, none of whom have held elected office, were not fully equipped to know what raising money as a politician is like, and that they should hold a “mock election” to gain fuller experience.</p> <p>“I think a good mock exercise is for everyone at CFB, everyone who’s making these decisions, to run a mock election,” Adams said. “Those who have never felt what what you go through to run an election can never really understand. I think to run a mock election, give them the task of calling people and giving them $500, if ever you want people to lose your number, try to raise that $500.”</p> <p>Adams has already made his own appointee to the charter revision commission empaneled through City Council legislation, which will begin its business soon and put forth recommendations next year. Adams has chosen former City Council Member Sal Albanese, who has been a proponent for campaign finance reform, organizing much of his 2017 mayoral run around the “democracy vouchers” program that has been implemented in Seattle.</p> <p>“Money is the enemy,” Adams said. “It is always going to be the enemy. We are always going to have a problem with corruption until we get money out of campaigns.”</p> <p>The mayoral charter revision commission will meet twice more next week, on Tuesday and Thursday, to hear expert testimony on community boards and land use, then civic engagement and independent redistricting.</p> <p>

***
by Ben Brachfeld, Gotham Gazette

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p> Note: Gotham Gazette is an independent publication of Citizens Union Foundation, sister organization of Citizens Union. </p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/charter-comm-rev2.jpg" alt="charter comm rev2" width="600" height="368" /></p> <p>The Charter Revision Commission</p> <hr /> <p>The Charter Revision Commission empaneled by Mayor Bill de Blasio met on Thursday at NYU for the second of four <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7705-mayoral-charter-revision-commission-announces-preliminary-agenda" target="_blank" rel="noopener">expert advisory issue forums</a>, discussing what could be the marquee issue for this year’s commission: changing the city’s campaign finance system. The first meeting, held Tuesday, <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7733-mayoral-charter-revision-commission-hears-expert-testimony-on-voting-and-elections" target="_blank" rel="noopener">focused on voting and election reform</a>.</p> <p>Like the first hearing, Thursday’s saw the commission hear from invited experts on the topic at hand, and was broken into two sections. For campaign finance, the first panel discussed context and perspective of the city’s system from politicians and experts, and the second provided recommendations.</p> <p>The commission, consisting of 15 members appointed by de Blasio, including Chair Cesar Perales, will finalize a list of proposed changes to the city Charter by early September that will then appear on the general election ballot in November for voters to approve or disapprove.</p> <p>Representatives from the city’s nonpartisan Campaign Finance Board provided five recommendations to the commission for improving the city’s public campaign finance system and its centerpiece, the public matching funds program. The board recommends:</p> <ol> <li dir="ltr"> <p>Lowering individual contribution limits from $5,100 to $2,250 for citywide offices, from $3,950 to $1,750 for boroughwide offices, and from $2,850 to $1,250 for City Council seats.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr"> <p>Increase the matching funds rate from 6-to-1 (for every dollar under $175 raised via an individual contribution, the city disburses $6) to 8-to-1. This would be coupled with an increase of the maximum matchable amount, from $175 to $250.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr"> <p>Increase the cap on public funds as a percentage of a campaign’s total spending limit from 55 percent to 65 percent.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr"> <p>Lower the threshold to qualify for matching funds for citywide races, from $250,000 from 1,000 eligible contributors for mayor and $125,000 from 500 contributors for public advocate and comptroller, to $125,000 and $75,000 respectively with the same number of contributors.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr"> <p>Lower the minimum individual contribution counted toward the public match threshold, from $10 to $5.</p> </li> </ol> <p>Others, including advocates, elected officials, and academics, also provided recommendations to the commission, with some differing from the CFB and others in line with it.</p> <p>The city’s public election financing system, whereby donations to candidates of up to $175 are matched by public dollars at a rate of 6 to 1, has been cited as a model nationwide for placing more power in elections in the hands of the average voter. City Council Member Carlos Menchaca testified to the committee that he never would have been able to mount an insurgent campaign without the system, and that it also allowed him to spend more time with voters rather than donors from out of the district.</p> <p>“What the system allowed me to do was to have a conversation with donors at $5, $10, and my branded experience of $38 for the 38th District, about the campaign finance,” Menchaca said. “That was my beginning part of my conversation with everyone, that their dollars would multiply by six. That allowed folks to feel empowered in a challenger, and for people that were not entrenched in the system, which is where I had to go build my political support, became possible.” Menchaca said his average contribution amount for his 2013 campaign, in which he pulled off the rare feat of unseating an incumbent, was “around $100.”</p> <p>The public matching program came into being in 1989, after a wave of corruption scandals in city, state, and federal government led to the passage of Local Law 8, which established a 1:1 match. The match was increased to 4:1 through the 1998 Charter Revision Commission, and was increased again to the current 6:1 in 2007.</p> <p>The system has significantly lowered candidate reliance on political action committee (PAC) money and other “big money” donations found at other levels of elected government, including state-level elections in New York. The CFB presented data comparing an unnamed City Council member’s finances with that of a member of Congress and of the state Senate. The member of Congress raised 77 percent of their money from PACs and 0.6 percent from small contributions of $200 or less. The state senator raised 89 percent from PACs and 7 percent from small contributions. The City Council member, on the other hand, raised 25 percent from PACs, and 62 percent from small contributions when matching fund allocations were taken into account.</p> <p>However, for citywide offices, the contribution percentages can be a red herring. In 2017, while 73 percent of contributions to mayoral candidates participating in the public match program came from donors who contributed under $175, 45 percent of the actual dollar value of the total contributions came from 650 individuals who donated the maximum for the 2017 election, which was $4,950 (it has since risen automatically, per law, to $5,100). For the City Council, the distribution is more equal, and in fact, Council candidates as a whole received more money in 2017 from small donors than from contributors of the maximum amount allowed by the program.</p> <p>Non-participants in the program can take the form of a rich self-funder like Michael Bloomberg, but can also take the form of an incumbent without serious competition not wanting to use taxpayer funds for a formality election or interested in looser restrictions on their spending. Non-participation in competitive races is fairly rare, though. According to the CFB’s Assistant Executive Director for Public Affairs, Eric Friedman, 28 out of 64 non-participants in the public finance system in 2017 reported raising $0.</p> <p>Others who testified were largely in line with the CFB on raising the match rate and reducing the maximum allowable contribution by about half. Advocates broke with the CFB on the issue of the match cap: while the CFB recommended that the cap be lifted to 65 percent, Alex Camarda of Reinvent Albany and Michael Malbin of SUNY Albany’s Campaign Finance Institute recommended that the cap be eliminated entirely, which would have the city provide more public funds relative to the spending limit.</p> <p>“I don’t see what purpose that serves,” Malbin said of the matching cap. Camarda and Malbin both endorsed raising the rate of matching funds rate above 6-to-1, but did not recommend a specific rate.</p> <p>For the 2021 election, the spending limit for a City Council candidate is set at $190,000, and the maximum public funds disbursement is $104,500, or 55 percent of the spending limit. Eliminating the cap would mean that a candidate could spend up to 85 percent of the spending limit using public funds. City Council Member Ben Kallos recently re-introduced a bill that would eliminate the matching funds cap.</p> <p>CFB representatives were asked by Commissioner Wendy Weiser, director of the Democracy Program at NYU’s Brennan Center, why the board is endorsing a 65 percent cap instead of elimination. CFB Executive Director Amy Loprest said that raising it to 85 percent would be impractical.</p> <p>“We make public funds payments to candidates who are on the ballot and who are opposed on the ballot, therefore we can only make those payments once the ballot has been set,” said Loprest. She noted that according to state election law, ballots could only be set after the end of petitioning. “The ballot is set roughly at the end of July, beginning of August. Which means that we make our first public funds payments at the beginning of August, which leaves about five weeks before the primary.” She noted that this would cause campaigns to be constrained to spending most of their money in the five weeks before the primary.</p> <p>Camarda agreed in part.</p> <p>“I think that in citywide races, 65 percent is plenty because citywide candidates don’t often hit the cap,” he said. “Our concern would be for City Council, because as I mentioned, 30 percent of the candidates in 2013 actually hit the cap.” The CFB stated that it wouldn’t oppose eliminating the cap, but that it was not its first preference.</p> <p>The commissioners, including Chair Perales, a former Secretary of State under Governor Andrew Cuomo, appeared receptive to the changes proposed by the CFB and the other testifiers, for the most part. Most lines of questioning were of an inquisitive rather than adversarial tone. The commissioner who was most skeptical and critical of the proposed changes was John Siegal, an attorney and a de Blasio appointee to the Civilian Complaint Review Board.</p> <p>“The reason, clearly, that mayoral candidates rely more on big contributions is because it takes a lot of money to run an effective mayoral campaign,” said Siegal, who donated $4,500 to de Blasio’s 2013 mayoral campaign. “And while it sounds good and feels good to say ‘let’s lower the contribution limit,’ that is going to have consequences. Candidates are going to have to work way harder to raise money. They’re going to have to spend a lot more time raising money.” He noted that there is an “efficiency to getting on the phone and getting 500 people to give $4,500 or $5,100 that is going to be lost here.”</p> <p>The CFB’s Chair, Frederick Schaffer, said that he would agree with Siegal if the only recommendation made by the Board was to lower the contribution limit.</p> <p>“That’s why we want to increase the match for citywide officials from 6-to-1 to 8-to-1, and increase the actual amount from $175 to $250,” Schaffer said. “We crunched those numbers precisely with this problem in mind, and we think that the overall effect of those three things together meets the concern that you have just expressed.”</p> <p>Siegal was also critical of a proposed “geographical requirement” for citywide candidates, which would force them to fundraise around the city. Malbin’s presentation to the commission noted that most money raised for citywide contests comes from only five City Council districts, representing Manhattan around Central Park and Brownstone Brooklyn. For citywide candidates, Malbin recommended that they must show a minimum number of contributors in 20 of 51 Council districts to qualify for public matching funds. The CFB suggested that citywide candidates raise 50 contributions from each borough.</p> <p>Siegal called this a “fundamentally different requirement than we’ve ever had in the system,” saying that previous campaign finance law was limiting the money candidates can raise rather than explicitly saying who it must be raised from, which he said would set a bad precedent, “engineering campaign fundraising.”</p> <p>“Have you actually looked at how many Republicans raise 50 matching contributions in [the] Bronx? Or how many Democrats actually raise 50 contributions in Staten Island? And do we really want to tell candidates that they have to go out and introduce themselves to communities where they have no background and no ties, and the first thing they have to do is go ask for money. That doesn’t seem to me that it’s getting money out of politics, it seems to me like it’s pushing the fundraising race into places for other reasons,” he added.</p> <p>Schaffer dismissed the notion that 50 contributions per borough was unattainable for a seeker of citywide office.</p> <p>“We’re trying to identify people who are reasonably likely to be real candidates, and so we thought the number 50 was really quite minimal, even for a Democrat in Staten Island or a Republican in the Bronx,” Schaffer said. There are currently three citywide elected offices: Mayor, Public Advocate, and Comptroller.</p> <p>Other commissioners also had questions and concerns. Dale Ho, of the ACLU’s Voting Rights Project, questioned whether it was appropriate to put such specific numbers, limits, and thresholds into the city charter, which he characterized as difficult to change and rarely brought up for debate, versus the easier-to-change city code.</p> <p>“As you can see from all this machinery here, [the charter] is quite difficult to amend,” Ho said. “If it turns out that the number should change over time, maybe the limits need to be reduced even more, maybe the match numbers need to go up even higher, maybe we miscalibrate something and we need to adjust something. If these changes are in the city charter, that kind of ties the hands of the city in a way that if they’re in the code, maybe they’re a little easier to adjust.”</p> <p>Schaffer, a former top appointee in the office of the city’s Corporation Counsel, its top lawyer, said he believed that the City Council can amend the charter “just like ordinary legislation,” which Perales agreed with.</p> <p>Other issues beyond those encompassed by the CFB’s recommendations also arose.</p> <p>Government reform group Citizens Union remained neutral on increasing public funds disbursement to candidates, but gave suggestions for transparency measures if the commission decided to increase the disbursement. Rachel Bloom, Citizens Union’s director of public policy, called on the commission to prohibit public funds disbursed to candidates to be used to pay consultants that also lobby the city, subject candidate coordination with union members to campaign finance regulations, tighten Local Law 181, which regulates the nonprofits of elected officials, restrict the transfer of campaign funds running for one office to another office, and to transfer lobbying reporting and enforcement to the CFB.</p> <p>When asked by Siegal if the CFB was interested in regulating lobbying, Loprest was ambivalent on whether the organization’s independence lent itself to being a watchdog on lobbying.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams advocated for eliminating money from politics entirely and moving to a 100 percent publicly funded system. Adams said that candidacies receiving public funding could be gauged by petition signatures, or by reaching a threshold through $1 donations that would end up in the public finance system. He also suggested that the members of the commission, none of whom have held elected office, were not fully equipped to know what raising money as a politician is like, and that they should hold a “mock election” to gain fuller experience.</p> <p>“I think a good mock exercise is for everyone at CFB, everyone who’s making these decisions, to run a mock election,” Adams said. “Those who have never felt what what you go through to run an election can never really understand. I think to run a mock election, give them the task of calling people and giving them $500, if ever you want people to lose your number, try to raise that $500.”</p> <p>Adams has already made his own appointee to the charter revision commission empaneled through City Council legislation, which will begin its business soon and put forth recommendations next year. Adams has chosen former City Council Member Sal Albanese, who has been a proponent for campaign finance reform, organizing much of his 2017 mayoral run around the “democracy vouchers” program that has been implemented in Seattle.</p> <p>“Money is the enemy,” Adams said. “It is always going to be the enemy. We are always going to have a problem with corruption until we get money out of campaigns.”</p> <p>The mayoral charter revision commission will meet twice more next week, on Tuesday and Thursday, to hear expert testimony on community boards and land use, then civic engagement and independent redistricting.</p> <p>

***
by Ben Brachfeld, Gotham Gazette

Read more by this writer.

</p> <p> Note: Gotham Gazette is an independent publication of Citizens Union Foundation, sister organization of Citizens Union. </p>
Eric Adams Previews Vision for Becoming City’s CEO 2018-05-02T04:00:00+00:00 2018-05-02T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7652-eric-adams-previews-vision-for-becoming-city-s-ceo Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/bpericadams-twitter-2.jpg" alt="bpericadams twitter 2" width="600" height="382" /></p> <p>Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams (photo: @bpericadams)</p> <hr /> <p>“I’m working towards City Hall,” Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams said on Tuesday, explaining during <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">a wide-ranging interview</a> that he has begun planning his run for mayor.</p> <p>It’s no secret that Adams, 57, who was elected borough president in 2013 and reelected last year, wants to succeed Mayor Bill de Blasio, a fellow Democrat who will be term-limited out of office at the end of 2021 -- he has made that clear for years. But on Tuesday, during <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">an appearance on the Max &amp; Murphy podcast</a> from Gotham Gazette and City Limits, Adams for the first time publicly offered insight into his vision for running the city and what part of his campaign pitch will be.</p> <p>“What we’ve been able to do here in Brooklyn, and my perception of where I believe the city needs to go, I think it’s different from all the candidates who are running and thinking about running,” he said, sitting in the vast conference room of Brooklyn Borough Hall. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>That difference comes in part from Adams’ background in policing. For 22 years, the borough president was a member of the NYPD. In the early 1990s, he said on Tuesday, he was active in developing the management system CompStat under Police Commissioner Bill Bratton — a system that has been credited for helping to drastically reduce crime and, according to Adams, “changed the culture of policing not only for New York but for the rest of America.”</p> <p>“When the police department made this change, every agency should have followed,” Adams said, pivoting toward his vision for managing the city’s immense bureaucracy and dozens of agencies. “We have enough money, the right agencies, and the right people in place, but the systems are broken.”</p> <p>A CompStat approach across all agencies, Adams said, would include technology to inspect and track progress in “real time.” “I’m going to professionalize our agencies so...we can start seeing our results not yearly, but daily. CompStat would be a model that would be used in every agency.”</p> <p>CompStat is known for its data-driven approach and tough culture of accountability on NYPD leaders, such as precinct commanders. “Commissioner Bratton came in and said, ‘We have to change the culture’, and he had to move people out of the way who couldn’t understand that change,” Adams said, adding there must be clear goals that relevant agencies are working together to achieve, efforts that today are too disjointed.</p> <p>Adams is typically supportive of de Blasio — even applauding the mayor during the podcast for “doing a good job” in improving access to after-school care and reducing both the use of stop-and-frisk policing as well as crime, among other positives he cited. But the borough president also noted problems with education, healthcare, police accountability, and affordability in the city, saying: “when you look at it, either we’re going downwards or we’re flat-lining, we don’t see any improvements.”</p> <p>Using the example of unemployment (which was at a near-record low of <a href="https://www.labor.ny.gov/stats/laus.asp" target="_blank" rel="noopener">4.2 percent in March 2018</a>, down from 8.3 percent when de Blasio first took office in January 2014) Adams said government agencies must work together more coherently.</p> <p>“I want to create a clear mission for the city that means every agency, although they have their individual portion of the mission, they should be all moving towards that vision. If the goal is to improve unemployment numbers, then we cannot have agencies that are in the way of allowing companies to open and do business in the city,” he said.</p> <p>“Yes, your mission might be to ensure buildings are safe, but that mission should also feed into the overall mission of the city. It should not take a year to grant a building permit.”</p> <p>Though there’s a ways to go until Adams presents voters his promises ahead of the 2021 mayoral election -- where he is expected to face Public Advocate Letitia James, Comptroller Scott Stringer, Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr., and possibly others in the Democratic primary -- the Brooklyn borough president is clearly thinking about how he will make his pitch and what would separate him from the crowd.</p> <p>During <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the podcast</a>, Adams touched on other aspects of current policy debates that may come into play during a future campaign, but are already playing out now.</p> <p>Most notably, Adams said he wants to examine whether the city should “tear down” and rebuild public housing developments. With crises plaguing the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) and many billions of dollars in infrastructure needs across its portfolio, Adams said the “only way to change the problem narrative is to think outside of the box.”</p> <p>“We’re asking Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to do a real analysis of repairs and the cost of going in and doing these repairs,” he said. “We need to have a conversation: do we tear down NYCHA and rebuild it at the quality level it needs to be?”</p> <p>“I say we must be committed to zero displacement: the current tenants are guaranteed to remain there,” he continued. “But there are old pipes, old roofs, and old wiring. What is it going to cost us to make NYCHA housing sustainable for the future?”</p> <p>Adams is also critical of politicians who treat NYCHA like a pony show to garner media attention and boost voter confidence, making apparent reference to Governor Andrew Cuomo’s recent interest in public housing. Adams recently stepped further into the politics surrounding NYCHA by inviting Cuomo’s Democratic primary opponent in this year’s election to tour NYCHA with him -- an offer Cynthia Nixon quickly took him up on, touring Albany Houses in Crown Heights with the borough president.</p> <p>Adams said the way some politicians treat NYCHA has created an “angry and distrustful” community of residents who are living in such impoverished conditions “they’ve given up.”</p> <p>“Folks have finally discovered there is a NYCHA and they’re walking through it, I don’t know where they’ve been all these years, the NYCHA problem did not start now,” Adams said.</p> <p>During the conversation with Gotham Gazette and City Limits, Adams also touched on other areas where he wants to usher in change.</p> <p>A top priority for Adams is campaign finance reform, with the borough president saying the current system means candidates are spending more time in affluent areas, away from where they need to be.</p> <p>“There is no reason we shouldn’t have a public-funded system,” he said. “People are not going to NYCHA or South Bronx or South Jamaica, Queens. They are going to affluent zip codes and focusing on finding donors in those areas.”</p> <p>At the moment, the city’s public financing program matches contributions up to $175 from locals at a six-to-one rate, with several requisite thresholds. As Adams puts it: “If I live in an affluent area, I don’t care what amount you lower [the donation limit to] it’s easier for me to call a hundred friends and say, ‘Hey, on your way to The Hamptons can you get 1,000 of your friends to donate $175?’ I can’t call someone from the Pink House and say, ‘Hey, you’re on your way to Coney Island Beach, can you give $175?’ It’s not going to happen.”</p> <p>“The number of calls you make to raise money is taking away from the quality time you should be spending doing your job,” he said. Adams wants a fully public system, whereby candidates don’t have to raise private money. He said that he wants an upcoming City Charter Revision Commission, on which he will have one of 15 appointees, to pursue such a change.</p> <p>That commission -- organized through City Council legislation at the behest of Public Advocate James, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, and City Council Speaker Corey Johnson (himself another possible 2021 mayoral candidate) -- will soon be formed, working toward proposals for the 2018 general election ballot. Mayor de Blasio has already formed his own Charter Revision Commission that just began its work, with a mandate to look closely at campaign finance reform.</p> <p>Adams is also particularly concerned with public health. He believes city schools shouldn’t be feeding students processed meat, and he regularly references the World Health Organization’s 2015 report that found “processed meat is carcinogenic to humans” — meaning it causes cancer.</p> <p>His concern for public health is personal, too. Adams completely changed his lifestyle upon receiving a Type Two Diabetes diagnosis in 2016. By changing his diet to vegan and increasing his exercise regimen, Adams’ blood sugar levels had returned to normal six months on from the diagnosis and he says he completely reversed the disease.</p> <p>“We are so dysfunctional as a city when you stop to think about it,” he said. “We have a schizophrenic healthcare philosophy. In one area we say that childhood obesity is an issue, asthma is an issue, yet we feed the children food that cause the diseases. There’s a disconnect.”</p> <p>These are just a few of the issues that are central to Adams’ work now, and could be central to his mayoral campaign.</p> <p>Yet before the 2021 city elections, there is the 2018 New York gubernatorial race and Adams is giving no indication of the candidate he’s planning to endorse in the Democratic primary, choosing between Cuomo, who he’s “disappointed in,” and Nixon (at least one other name is likely to be on the ballot, perennial candidate Randy Credico).</p> <p>“I have not kept it a secret that I’m extremely disappointed in the treatment of Brooklyn in comparison to other boroughs, particularly the Bronx,” Adams said when asked about Cuomo, who has a long, close relationship with Diaz, Jr. “We’re looking at all the candidates to determine which way we’re going to go.”</p> <p>“I think the primaries allow us to hear the voices of those who are running. It’s going to an exciting time,” Adams said. He also spoke about possibly backing Brooklyn City Council Member Jumaane Williams, who is running for Lieutenant Governor in the primary against incumbent Kathy Hochul and Adams knows well.</p> <p>Also on the podcast, Adams spoke about plans for redevelopment in Brooklyn; his reaction to the April shooting of Brooklyn resident Saheed Vassell by police; the mayor’s recent budget proposal; and de Blasio’s record more broadly.</p> <p><em>Listen to Eric Adams on the Max &amp; Murphy podcast <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>, or find it wherever you get your podcasts.</em></p> <p>

***
by Caitlin Bishop, Gotham Gazette
@caitybishop  @GothamGazette

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/bpericadams-twitter-2.jpg" alt="bpericadams twitter 2" width="600" height="382" /></p> <p>Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams (photo: @bpericadams)</p> <hr /> <p>“I’m working towards City Hall,” Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams said on Tuesday, explaining during <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">a wide-ranging interview</a> that he has begun planning his run for mayor.</p> <p>It’s no secret that Adams, 57, who was elected borough president in 2013 and reelected last year, wants to succeed Mayor Bill de Blasio, a fellow Democrat who will be term-limited out of office at the end of 2021 -- he has made that clear for years. But on Tuesday, during <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">an appearance on the Max &amp; Murphy podcast</a> from Gotham Gazette and City Limits, Adams for the first time publicly offered insight into his vision for running the city and what part of his campaign pitch will be.</p> <p>“What we’ve been able to do here in Brooklyn, and my perception of where I believe the city needs to go, I think it’s different from all the candidates who are running and thinking about running,” he said, sitting in the vast conference room of Brooklyn Borough Hall. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>That difference comes in part from Adams’ background in policing. For 22 years, the borough president was a member of the NYPD. In the early 1990s, he said on Tuesday, he was active in developing the management system CompStat under Police Commissioner Bill Bratton — a system that has been credited for helping to drastically reduce crime and, according to Adams, “changed the culture of policing not only for New York but for the rest of America.”</p> <p>“When the police department made this change, every agency should have followed,” Adams said, pivoting toward his vision for managing the city’s immense bureaucracy and dozens of agencies. “We have enough money, the right agencies, and the right people in place, but the systems are broken.”</p> <p>A CompStat approach across all agencies, Adams said, would include technology to inspect and track progress in “real time.” “I’m going to professionalize our agencies so...we can start seeing our results not yearly, but daily. CompStat would be a model that would be used in every agency.”</p> <p>CompStat is known for its data-driven approach and tough culture of accountability on NYPD leaders, such as precinct commanders. “Commissioner Bratton came in and said, ‘We have to change the culture’, and he had to move people out of the way who couldn’t understand that change,” Adams said, adding there must be clear goals that relevant agencies are working together to achieve, efforts that today are too disjointed.</p> <p>Adams is typically supportive of de Blasio — even applauding the mayor during the podcast for “doing a good job” in improving access to after-school care and reducing both the use of stop-and-frisk policing as well as crime, among other positives he cited. But the borough president also noted problems with education, healthcare, police accountability, and affordability in the city, saying: “when you look at it, either we’re going downwards or we’re flat-lining, we don’t see any improvements.”</p> <p>Using the example of unemployment (which was at a near-record low of <a href="https://www.labor.ny.gov/stats/laus.asp" target="_blank" rel="noopener">4.2 percent in March 2018</a>, down from 8.3 percent when de Blasio first took office in January 2014) Adams said government agencies must work together more coherently.</p> <p>“I want to create a clear mission for the city that means every agency, although they have their individual portion of the mission, they should be all moving towards that vision. If the goal is to improve unemployment numbers, then we cannot have agencies that are in the way of allowing companies to open and do business in the city,” he said.</p> <p>“Yes, your mission might be to ensure buildings are safe, but that mission should also feed into the overall mission of the city. It should not take a year to grant a building permit.”</p> <p>Though there’s a ways to go until Adams presents voters his promises ahead of the 2021 mayoral election -- where he is expected to face Public Advocate Letitia James, Comptroller Scott Stringer, Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr., and possibly others in the Democratic primary -- the Brooklyn borough president is clearly thinking about how he will make his pitch and what would separate him from the crowd.</p> <p>During <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the podcast</a>, Adams touched on other aspects of current policy debates that may come into play during a future campaign, but are already playing out now.</p> <p>Most notably, Adams said he wants to examine whether the city should “tear down” and rebuild public housing developments. With crises plaguing the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) and many billions of dollars in infrastructure needs across its portfolio, Adams said the “only way to change the problem narrative is to think outside of the box.”</p> <p>“We’re asking Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to do a real analysis of repairs and the cost of going in and doing these repairs,” he said. “We need to have a conversation: do we tear down NYCHA and rebuild it at the quality level it needs to be?”</p> <p>“I say we must be committed to zero displacement: the current tenants are guaranteed to remain there,” he continued. “But there are old pipes, old roofs, and old wiring. What is it going to cost us to make NYCHA housing sustainable for the future?”</p> <p>Adams is also critical of politicians who treat NYCHA like a pony show to garner media attention and boost voter confidence, making apparent reference to Governor Andrew Cuomo’s recent interest in public housing. Adams recently stepped further into the politics surrounding NYCHA by inviting Cuomo’s Democratic primary opponent in this year’s election to tour NYCHA with him -- an offer Cynthia Nixon quickly took him up on, touring Albany Houses in Crown Heights with the borough president.</p> <p>Adams said the way some politicians treat NYCHA has created an “angry and distrustful” community of residents who are living in such impoverished conditions “they’ve given up.”</p> <p>“Folks have finally discovered there is a NYCHA and they’re walking through it, I don’t know where they’ve been all these years, the NYCHA problem did not start now,” Adams said.</p> <p>During the conversation with Gotham Gazette and City Limits, Adams also touched on other areas where he wants to usher in change.</p> <p>A top priority for Adams is campaign finance reform, with the borough president saying the current system means candidates are spending more time in affluent areas, away from where they need to be.</p> <p>“There is no reason we shouldn’t have a public-funded system,” he said. “People are not going to NYCHA or South Bronx or South Jamaica, Queens. They are going to affluent zip codes and focusing on finding donors in those areas.”</p> <p>At the moment, the city’s public financing program matches contributions up to $175 from locals at a six-to-one rate, with several requisite thresholds. As Adams puts it: “If I live in an affluent area, I don’t care what amount you lower [the donation limit to] it’s easier for me to call a hundred friends and say, ‘Hey, on your way to The Hamptons can you get 1,000 of your friends to donate $175?’ I can’t call someone from the Pink House and say, ‘Hey, you’re on your way to Coney Island Beach, can you give $175?’ It’s not going to happen.”</p> <p>“The number of calls you make to raise money is taking away from the quality time you should be spending doing your job,” he said. Adams wants a fully public system, whereby candidates don’t have to raise private money. He said that he wants an upcoming City Charter Revision Commission, on which he will have one of 15 appointees, to pursue such a change.</p> <p>That commission -- organized through City Council legislation at the behest of Public Advocate James, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, and City Council Speaker Corey Johnson (himself another possible 2021 mayoral candidate) -- will soon be formed, working toward proposals for the 2018 general election ballot. Mayor de Blasio has already formed his own Charter Revision Commission that just began its work, with a mandate to look closely at campaign finance reform.</p> <p>Adams is also particularly concerned with public health. He believes city schools shouldn’t be feeding students processed meat, and he regularly references the World Health Organization’s 2015 report that found “processed meat is carcinogenic to humans” — meaning it causes cancer.</p> <p>His concern for public health is personal, too. Adams completely changed his lifestyle upon receiving a Type Two Diabetes diagnosis in 2016. By changing his diet to vegan and increasing his exercise regimen, Adams’ blood sugar levels had returned to normal six months on from the diagnosis and he says he completely reversed the disease.</p> <p>“We are so dysfunctional as a city when you stop to think about it,” he said. “We have a schizophrenic healthcare philosophy. In one area we say that childhood obesity is an issue, asthma is an issue, yet we feed the children food that cause the diseases. There’s a disconnect.”</p> <p>These are just a few of the issues that are central to Adams’ work now, and could be central to his mayoral campaign.</p> <p>Yet before the 2021 city elections, there is the 2018 New York gubernatorial race and Adams is giving no indication of the candidate he’s planning to endorse in the Democratic primary, choosing between Cuomo, who he’s “disappointed in,” and Nixon (at least one other name is likely to be on the ballot, perennial candidate Randy Credico).</p> <p>“I have not kept it a secret that I’m extremely disappointed in the treatment of Brooklyn in comparison to other boroughs, particularly the Bronx,” Adams said when asked about Cuomo, who has a long, close relationship with Diaz, Jr. “We’re looking at all the candidates to determine which way we’re going to go.”</p> <p>“I think the primaries allow us to hear the voices of those who are running. It’s going to an exciting time,” Adams said. He also spoke about possibly backing Brooklyn City Council Member Jumaane Williams, who is running for Lieutenant Governor in the primary against incumbent Kathy Hochul and Adams knows well.</p> <p>Also on the podcast, Adams spoke about plans for redevelopment in Brooklyn; his reaction to the April shooting of Brooklyn resident Saheed Vassell by police; the mayor’s recent budget proposal; and de Blasio’s record more broadly.</p> <p><em>Listen to Eric Adams on the Max &amp; Murphy podcast <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>, or find it wherever you get your podcasts.</em></p> <p>

***
by Caitlin Bishop, Gotham Gazette
@caitybishop  @GothamGazette

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Max & Murphy Podcast: Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams 2018-05-01T04:00:00+00:00 2018-05-01T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette, and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>May 1, 2018 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/eric-adams-m-m-pod-277px.jpg" alt="eric adams m m pod 277px" width="277" height="143" style="margin: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p>Eric Adams is planning to be the next Mayor of New York City. Right now, though, he is in his second and last term as Brooklyn Borough President. On this episode of the podcast, Adams discusses key issues facing Brooklyn and the city, including the crises at NYCHA and much more, as well as his political ambitions, how he plans to separate himself from the pack in the upcoming mayoral race, and how he is approaching any endorsements in this year's elections for Governor and Lieutenant Governor.</p> <p>Listen to the full conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a> and guest Eric Adams (<a href="https://twitter.com/BPEricAdams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@BPEricAdams</a>). You can listen to the episode through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts.</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/437875344&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="170" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette, and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p><strong>May 1, 2018 - Max &amp; Murphy Podcast: Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams<br /></strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/eric-adams-m-m-pod-277px.jpg" alt="eric adams m m pod 277px" width="277" height="143" style="margin: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p>Eric Adams is planning to be the next Mayor of New York City. Right now, though, he is in his second and last term as Brooklyn Borough President. On this episode of the podcast, Adams discusses key issues facing Brooklyn and the city, including the crises at NYCHA and much more, as well as his political ambitions, how he plans to separate himself from the pack in the upcoming mayoral race, and how he is approaching any endorsements in this year's elections for Governor and Lieutenant Governor.</p> <p>Listen to the full conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@JarrettMurphy</a> and guest Eric Adams (<a href="https://twitter.com/BPEricAdams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@BPEricAdams</a>). You can listen to the episode through the embedded audio below or download the episode wherever you get your podcasts.</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/437875344&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="170" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Elected Officials, Advocates Push for Instant Runoff Voting 2018-05-01T04:00:00+00:00 2018-05-01T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7650-elected-officials-advocates-push-for-instant-runoff-voting Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/fair-vote-sam.jpg" alt="fair vote sam" width="600" height="451" /></p> <p>Tuesday's press conference (photo: Samar Khurshid/Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p>Several prominent Democratic elected officials and voting reform advocates on Tuesday assembled outside City Hall to call for instant runoff voting in citywide primary elections. Specifically, they said that Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Charter Revision Commission, which just began a series of public hearings across the city, should include it among the proposals it puts before voters on the ballot this November.</p> <p>Instant runoff voting, also known as ranked-choice voting, allows voters to rank primary candidates in order of preference so that if one candidate does not cross the required threshold for victory, the candidate with the least number of votes is eliminated and the votes are redistributed based on the second choice selected by voters who had selected the eliminated candidate first, and so on until a winner emerges. The system prevents what can be costly and labor-intensive runoff elections, such as the one held in the 2013 primary election for public advocate.</p> <p>Runoffs are currently only required in the three citywide races, for Mayor, Public Advocate, and Comptroller, and occur among the top two vote-getters if no candidate hits 40 percent in the first round of the primary.</p> <p>Though prior instant runoff proposals originating in the City Council have failed, the group of electeds and advocates sought to seize on an opportunity presented by the mayor’s creation of the Charter Revision Commission. The commission, which is holding hearings across the five boroughs to solicit public input as to what its agenda should be, can consider any proposal presented to it, though de Blasio charged its members with particularly looking at voting access and campaign finance reform. Its recommendations will take the form of ballot referenda to be offered to voters in this year’s general election.</p> <p>“I am the face of instant runoff, let me remind you,” said Public Advocate Letitia James at Tuesday’s news conference, on the steps of City Hall. The 2013 public advocate runoff -- which James won over then-State Senator Daniel Squadron -- cost an estimated $13 million to taxpayers, surpassing the office’s combined budget for James’ entire first four-year term. James said Tuesday that instant runoffs are the “least expensive and more democratic option” for the city.</p> <p>“It forces you to appeal to all voters as opposed to one Democratic base,” James added. “And this means more engagement, and less polarization and more democracy. It means listening to people you might not usually listen to and a freer exchange of ideas and is consistent with our principle of democracy and free elections,” James added. She later also suggested that if the mayor’s commission failed to take up the proposal, a separate Charter Revision Commission being created by the City Council, through a bill co-sponsored by James, could step in. &nbsp;</p> <p>Also in attendance Tuesday were Comptroller Scott Stringer, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, and City Council Members Brad Lander, Antonio Reynoso, and Ben Kallos, all Democrats. James, Stringer, and Adams are all widely considered to be contenders for the 2021 mayoral race and share overlapping bases of supporters. It’s unclear, though, whether a runoff, instant or otherwise, will come into play in that race and who might benefit from which format. Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr. is a fourth likely Democratic mayoral candidate, and several others may also jump into the race, creating a crowded field more apt to produce a runoff.</p> <p>The 2013 Democratic mayoral primary narrowly avoided a runoff, with eventual winner Bill de Blasio earning just above the 40 percent threshold. There was a Democratic runoff in the 2009 primary for public advocate, which de Blasio won. The 2001 Democratic mayoral primary was also settled through a runoff.</p> <p>“Cities that have adopted instant runoff voting to eliminate runoffs have not only saved millions of dollars but have also improved their democracies by making sure that we are electing our leaders in an election where the most voters, the most diverse voters, are at the polls at one time,” said Grace Ramsey, deputy outreach director for FairVote, a nonpartisan advocacy group, at the news conference. Ramsey noted that 15 cities across the country have already implemented instant runoffs. A FairVote analysis of the 2013 public advocate runoff also showed that the Democratic primary runoff electorate was older, whiter, and wealthier than Democrats overall, and only reflected a 7 percent turnout. It occured on Tuesday, October 1, 2013.</p> <p>Critiquing the state’s arcane election laws, Stringer said instant runoffs are a “progressive leap” that would allow elections to be decided quickly and efficiently, and he said the mayor’s Charter Revision Commission affords the city a prime opportunity to pursue the policy. “We don’t have to go to Albany and deal with that political dysfunction in order to get this electoral reform,” he said, an apparent reference to that fact that many other voting and election laws are dictated by the state.</p> <p>In December, Douglas Kellner, the Democratic co-chair of the New York State Board of Elections, testified before the City Council on the 2017 elections and warned them that they had “dodged a bullet” by narrowly avoiding a runoff in the mayoral primary for the Reform Party line. Kellner said at the news conference Tuesday that the state already has the technology and capability to implement instant runoff voting, and reiterated the cost savings associated with implementing the system. &nbsp;</p> <p>“We cannot continue to have an 8-track method in an iPhone age,” said Adams, the Brooklyn borough president. “It is time to ensure that the process encourages people to come out. We live in real time, we live in instant time...Let’s make sure runoff elections are a thing of the past and let’s do it in the right way.”</p> <p>The proposal put forward on Tuesday was not the first attempt at eliminating runoff elections. In 2014, Council Member Lander sponsored a bill to call a referendum on the issue. Mayor de Blasio didn’t support it at the time and has since been lukewarm on the proposal. Asked Tuesday by a reporter if there was any opposition to the proposal, Lander said, “I think it’s just an issue that it’s change and change is not always easy. This is a change to our electoral processes and that’s not something we’re always ready to do.”</p> <p>As the group was gathered at City Hall, a parallel voting reform effort was being advanced in the state capital as well. The state Senate Democrats, led by Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins, unveiled <a href="https://www.scribd.com/document/377827073/05-01-18-Why-Don-t-More-New-Yorkers-Vote-A-Statewide-Snapshot-Identifying-Low-Voter-Turnout" target="_blank" rel="noopener">a new report</a> highlighting the shortcomings of the state’s election system that led to an abysmally low voter turnout in the 2016 presidential election. They also released an accompanying package of bills to address voter access and participation. The conference is in the minority, though, and there is limited likelihood that the Republican majority will advance the reforms being sought, such as early voting.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">[Read: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7369-state-board-of-elections-official-says-city-must-move-to-instant-runoff-voting" target="_blank" rel="noopener">State Board of Elections Official Says City Must Move to Instant Runoff Voting</a>]</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, Senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/fair-vote-sam.jpg" alt="fair vote sam" width="600" height="451" /></p> <p>Tuesday's press conference (photo: Samar Khurshid/Gotham Gazette)</p> <hr /> <p>Several prominent Democratic elected officials and voting reform advocates on Tuesday assembled outside City Hall to call for instant runoff voting in citywide primary elections. Specifically, they said that Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Charter Revision Commission, which just began a series of public hearings across the city, should include it among the proposals it puts before voters on the ballot this November.</p> <p>Instant runoff voting, also known as ranked-choice voting, allows voters to rank primary candidates in order of preference so that if one candidate does not cross the required threshold for victory, the candidate with the least number of votes is eliminated and the votes are redistributed based on the second choice selected by voters who had selected the eliminated candidate first, and so on until a winner emerges. The system prevents what can be costly and labor-intensive runoff elections, such as the one held in the 2013 primary election for public advocate.</p> <p>Runoffs are currently only required in the three citywide races, for Mayor, Public Advocate, and Comptroller, and occur among the top two vote-getters if no candidate hits 40 percent in the first round of the primary.</p> <p>Though prior instant runoff proposals originating in the City Council have failed, the group of electeds and advocates sought to seize on an opportunity presented by the mayor’s creation of the Charter Revision Commission. The commission, which is holding hearings across the five boroughs to solicit public input as to what its agenda should be, can consider any proposal presented to it, though de Blasio charged its members with particularly looking at voting access and campaign finance reform. Its recommendations will take the form of ballot referenda to be offered to voters in this year’s general election.</p> <p>“I am the face of instant runoff, let me remind you,” said Public Advocate Letitia James at Tuesday’s news conference, on the steps of City Hall. The 2013 public advocate runoff -- which James won over then-State Senator Daniel Squadron -- cost an estimated $13 million to taxpayers, surpassing the office’s combined budget for James’ entire first four-year term. James said Tuesday that instant runoffs are the “least expensive and more democratic option” for the city.</p> <p>“It forces you to appeal to all voters as opposed to one Democratic base,” James added. “And this means more engagement, and less polarization and more democracy. It means listening to people you might not usually listen to and a freer exchange of ideas and is consistent with our principle of democracy and free elections,” James added. She later also suggested that if the mayor’s commission failed to take up the proposal, a separate Charter Revision Commission being created by the City Council, through a bill co-sponsored by James, could step in. &nbsp;</p> <p>Also in attendance Tuesday were Comptroller Scott Stringer, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, and City Council Members Brad Lander, Antonio Reynoso, and Ben Kallos, all Democrats. James, Stringer, and Adams are all widely considered to be contenders for the 2021 mayoral race and share overlapping bases of supporters. It’s unclear, though, whether a runoff, instant or otherwise, will come into play in that race and who might benefit from which format. Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr. is a fourth likely Democratic mayoral candidate, and several others may also jump into the race, creating a crowded field more apt to produce a runoff.</p> <p>The 2013 Democratic mayoral primary narrowly avoided a runoff, with eventual winner Bill de Blasio earning just above the 40 percent threshold. There was a Democratic runoff in the 2009 primary for public advocate, which de Blasio won. The 2001 Democratic mayoral primary was also settled through a runoff.</p> <p>“Cities that have adopted instant runoff voting to eliminate runoffs have not only saved millions of dollars but have also improved their democracies by making sure that we are electing our leaders in an election where the most voters, the most diverse voters, are at the polls at one time,” said Grace Ramsey, deputy outreach director for FairVote, a nonpartisan advocacy group, at the news conference. Ramsey noted that 15 cities across the country have already implemented instant runoffs. A FairVote analysis of the 2013 public advocate runoff also showed that the Democratic primary runoff electorate was older, whiter, and wealthier than Democrats overall, and only reflected a 7 percent turnout. It occured on Tuesday, October 1, 2013.</p> <p>Critiquing the state’s arcane election laws, Stringer said instant runoffs are a “progressive leap” that would allow elections to be decided quickly and efficiently, and he said the mayor’s Charter Revision Commission affords the city a prime opportunity to pursue the policy. “We don’t have to go to Albany and deal with that political dysfunction in order to get this electoral reform,” he said, an apparent reference to that fact that many other voting and election laws are dictated by the state.</p> <p>In December, Douglas Kellner, the Democratic co-chair of the New York State Board of Elections, testified before the City Council on the 2017 elections and warned them that they had “dodged a bullet” by narrowly avoiding a runoff in the mayoral primary for the Reform Party line. Kellner said at the news conference Tuesday that the state already has the technology and capability to implement instant runoff voting, and reiterated the cost savings associated with implementing the system. &nbsp;</p> <p>“We cannot continue to have an 8-track method in an iPhone age,” said Adams, the Brooklyn borough president. “It is time to ensure that the process encourages people to come out. We live in real time, we live in instant time...Let’s make sure runoff elections are a thing of the past and let’s do it in the right way.”</p> <p>The proposal put forward on Tuesday was not the first attempt at eliminating runoff elections. In 2014, Council Member Lander sponsored a bill to call a referendum on the issue. Mayor de Blasio didn’t support it at the time and has since been lukewarm on the proposal. Asked Tuesday by a reporter if there was any opposition to the proposal, Lander said, “I think it’s just an issue that it’s change and change is not always easy. This is a change to our electoral processes and that’s not something we’re always ready to do.”</p> <p>As the group was gathered at City Hall, a parallel voting reform effort was being advanced in the state capital as well. The state Senate Democrats, led by Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins, unveiled <a href="https://www.scribd.com/document/377827073/05-01-18-Why-Don-t-More-New-Yorkers-Vote-A-Statewide-Snapshot-Identifying-Low-Voter-Turnout" target="_blank" rel="noopener">a new report</a> highlighting the shortcomings of the state’s election system that led to an abysmally low voter turnout in the 2016 presidential election. They also released an accompanying package of bills to address voter access and participation. The conference is in the minority, though, and there is limited likelihood that the Republican majority will advance the reforms being sought, such as early voting.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">[Read: <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7369-state-board-of-elections-official-says-city-must-move-to-instant-runoff-voting" target="_blank" rel="noopener">State Board of Elections Official Says City Must Move to Instant Runoff Voting</a>]</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, Senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Can Redevelopment of the Bedford Union Armory Be Saved? 2017-10-03T04:00:00+00:00 2017-10-03T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7232-can-redevelopment-of-the-bedford-union-armory-be-saved Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/bedford-armory-rendering.jpg" alt="bedford armory rendering" width="600" height="423" /></p> <p>Rendering of the Bedford Union Armory via BFC Partners</p> <hr /> <p>A land use proposal to redevelop the 138,000-square-foot, publicly-owned Bedford Union Armory in Crown Heights to create a mix of different types of housing and a state-of-the-art recreation center has seen successive setbacks in recent months. As proposed, the project has been rejected by community advocates, the local community board, the local City Council member, Laurie Cumbo, and the borough president, Eric Adams, all of whom believe the project should include more affordable housing.</p> <p>The de Blasio administration, in response, has vowed to work with local elected officials and the city-selected developer behind the project to make it acceptable, especially to Cumbo, who will have the final say in a few short weeks.</p> <p>But, with any land use redevelopment, the administration must balance the resources at its disposal to achieve maximum effect, and in this case, making the project more palatable to community members calling it a harbinger of gentrification would likely mean making it less profitable for the developer and more costly for the city. As the clock ticks on negotiations and a series of essential decisions dictated by the city’s land use review process, it is unclear what steps the de Blasio administration might take to make a deal happen, advance a key project, and avoid a potentially significant political defeat.</p> <p>BFC Partners is the developer selected through a competitive bidding process run by the New York City Economic Development Corporation. The initial request for proposals (RFP) was put out in October 2013, prior to Mayor Bill de Blasio taking office, and the project was awarded to BFC in December 2015. Over the next year, the project became a source of significant controversy and become a burning issue in this year’s District 35 City Council race, where Cumbo was running for reelection. It has also become a symbol of the de Blasio administration’s strategy for creating affordable housing across the city and a sore spot and political vulnerability for the mayor, a fellow Democrat who did not endorse Cumbo but sent behind-the-scenes support for her campaign.</p> <p>The redevelopment proposal envisions converting the armory -- which spans an entire city block and sits defunct -- into an affordable recreation center, 330 rental housing units at various levels of affordability, and 56 condominiums to be sold.</p> <p>Of the 330 rental units, 164 would be market rate while the rest would be “affordable” for low-income and middle-income families, whereby rents are capped so that tenants pay no more than 30 percent of their income to the landlord. Affordability is calculated according to the 2016 Area Median Income (AMI) of $81,600 for a family of three. The rental units would include 18 units at 40 percent AMI; 49 units at 50 percent AMI; and 99 units at 110 percent AMI, providing rent regulated apartments to households of various income levels.</p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/reset_1/screen-shot-2017-10-03-at-11.22.jpg" alt="AMI apartments Bedford Union Armory" width="400" height="140" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></p> <p>Of the condos, 44 would be sold at market rate and 12 at 120 percent AMI. BFC Partners would receive a 99-year ground lease on a majority of the site, recouping its costs through sales of the condos, rents on the apartments, fees from the recreation center, and a developer fee from the city.</p> <p>De Blasio has pitched the project as a much-needed community facility, similar to the Park Slope Armory recreation center, which can be kept affordable in the long-term under the current structure of the plan, with the benefit of creating affordable housing. As it stands, the project does not include any housing subsidies that the administration has used in the past to create more affordability in land use redevelopments. At a September 14 news conference, de Blasio indicated openness to adding more subsidies, though he was noncommittal as to what the city might do to sweeten the deal.</p> <p>“[W]e want that to be the best possible project for the community, we're going to look at every way to improve it,” he told reporters, noting that the current plan allows for the recreation center to be affordable on an ongoing basis. “That's what we need to come out of this in the end. But we’re going to work with the Council member to see if there is a way to improve the project that would win her support and be more comfortable for the community.”</p> <p>Cumbo, the Council member de Blasio referred to, recently won the primary for her reelection effort against an opponent who put the Bedford Union Armory at the core of the campaign, accusing Cumbo of being too close to real estate developers and ineffective at stemming the gentrification and displacement sweeping the changing district. Cumbo faced criticism for dithering about the project for months only to oppose it earlier this year, but came to draw a line in the sand on the project. Without her approval, the project is dead on arrival at the City Council, which traditionally votes with the local member on land use applications and will have 50 days to evaluate the deal once it is referred by the City Planning Commission, perhaps with adjustments, unless it is taken completely off the table by then.</p> <p>Cumbo was not made available to comment for this article. Her spokesperson, Kristia Beaubrun, referred Gotham Gazette to the Council member’s statement in May when she came out against the proposal.</p> <p>"Since the very beginning our message has been clear: We will not allow public land to be used for the purpose of luxury condominiums,” she said, calling on the mayor to “go back to the drawing board and produce a plan that meets the needs of my Brooklyn neighbors.”</p> <p>Last month, Borough President Adams, as part of the Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) required of all such proposals, rejected the project and recommended that the city increase the number of deeply affordable units and also provide more upper-tier affordable housing units to offset the costs of running the recreation center.</p> <p>Adams also called for more permanent affordability -- currently, 30 percent of the units are permanently affordable -- and for 20 percent of the rental apartments to be allotted to the Department of Housing Preservation and Development’s “Our Space Initiative” for housing homeless families. “This is our opportunity to get this right,” he said. “This process has gone through years of debate, emotions, and public scrutiny, both for and against the development. We must ultimately come together and find the right balance that is the ideal solution for the future of Crown Heights, and for the optimal reuse of the Bedford Union Armory as a public resource.”</p> <p>The proposal is currently before the City Planning Commission, which will hold a public review session on Wednesday before voting on the project later this month. The CPC can either approve the project, with or without changes, and send it to the City Council for further review, or it can reject it, although that would be shocking and especially rare.</p> <p>“It’s hard for me to imagine tweaks at this stage that would address the concerns being raised,” said Emily Goldstein, senior campaign organizer at the Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development. Goldstein, who is not involved in the community efforts around the armory, said the administration isn’t taking full advantage of the city’s ownership of the land, which allows it to demand more benefits than it could if the project were on a privately-owned site. “There are broader concerns about wanting lasting community control,” she said.</p> <p>Goldstein hits at the heart of the opposition to the project by community activists. The Our Armory Coalition, a group that includes the Crown Heights Tenant Union, New York Communities for Change, Picture the Homeless, The Black Institute, The Legal Aid Society, and others, have called for a community land trust to develop the project, rather than a private firm. That would allow community voices to drive decisions on the property in the community interest, rather than effectively giving a for-profit developer a century-long hold over public property.</p> <p>“The RFP process for the Bedford Armory has been flawed and corrupt from the very start,” said the coalition, in a statement last month, calling for the project to be scrapped entirely and for the city to issue a new request for proposals. “Elected officials including Cumbo are [sic] failed to address the fact that BFC is a for profit developer, making money off our public land while not providing real affordability to the community. And that’s unacceptable.”</p> <p>“I don’t see any reason it shouldn’t be explored,” said ANHD’s Goldstein of a community land trust, also insisting that it isn’t the only option available. “There are other ways to build in the idea that public land is a public resource that should remain public. I think there’s a flaw in the calculus the city is using.”</p> <p>She acknowledged that deeper affordability would require more city subsidies and that BFC’s application may have been the most attractive proposal. But, she said, “It’s shortsighted to do what’s cheaper in the short term. What you lose in the long term is permanent affordability. It’s hard to start from where they are and make it more affordable.”</p> <p>One housing expert said the city is trying to save as much money as possible, and any subsidies applied to the Bedford Union Armory would mean not being able to use them in other neighborhoods. “The city likes to think of itself as a negotiator on the community side but they’re really not, they’re really just a broker,” said the expert said, who requested anonymity to speak more freely and pointed out that the hurdles to the Bedford Armory project stem from the city’s “deal-by-deal approach” to development, which allows community advocates to pressure the administration with an all-or-nothing opposition rather than pushing for compromise.</p> <p>That’s the case with the Our Armory coalition. Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change and a strident critic of the administration on its housing policies, is adamant that the only way the project could be acceptable to his group is if there are no luxury condos or market-rate rental units. “They could force the developer off the project and make it 100 percent affordable since it’s on public land,” he said. “Using public land to build luxury housing is a travesty.”</p> <p>Although issuing a new RFP for the project, and triggering another round of ULURP, could potentially take years, Westin said it would be worth it. “It’s better than a gentrification project that would displace the community.”</p> <p>Westin also pushed back against the argument that the condos are being used to cross-subsidize the recreation center. A BFC spokesperson earlier told Gotham Gazette that the firm will make a net profit of less than $800,000 from the sale of the condos and that those funds would be put back into the recreation center. The spokesperson also said that the annual cash-flow from all the rental units, which are expensive to operate and maintain, would be around $800,000. Citing Borough President Adams’ recommendations, the spokesperson pointed out that removing the revenue-generating component of the project would require other funds to fill the gap, while noting that the original RFP for the project specified that the developer should not request any housing subsidies from the city.</p> <p>“This cross-subsidization frame is what luxury developers use to justify luxury development,” Westin said. Instead, he said the city could designate the armory as a land bank and set restrictions on the land, which could then be developed by a nonprofit developer. “It’s completely feasible to do this project 100 percent affordable,” he said.</p> <p>The project does have its supporters. Geoffrey Davis, a Democratic district leader from Crown Heights, emphasized that the recreation center was a necessity for the community. “Our seniors, our young people, our community will have a place to go to,” he said in a phone interview. “I say, continue to negotiate, work it out. Do not leave the table. If you say kill the deal and walk away, we’re talking about another 30 years.”</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, Senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/bedford-armory-rendering.jpg" alt="bedford armory rendering" width="600" height="423" /></p> <p>Rendering of the Bedford Union Armory via BFC Partners</p> <hr /> <p>A land use proposal to redevelop the 138,000-square-foot, publicly-owned Bedford Union Armory in Crown Heights to create a mix of different types of housing and a state-of-the-art recreation center has seen successive setbacks in recent months. As proposed, the project has been rejected by community advocates, the local community board, the local City Council member, Laurie Cumbo, and the borough president, Eric Adams, all of whom believe the project should include more affordable housing.</p> <p>The de Blasio administration, in response, has vowed to work with local elected officials and the city-selected developer behind the project to make it acceptable, especially to Cumbo, who will have the final say in a few short weeks.</p> <p>But, with any land use redevelopment, the administration must balance the resources at its disposal to achieve maximum effect, and in this case, making the project more palatable to community members calling it a harbinger of gentrification would likely mean making it less profitable for the developer and more costly for the city. As the clock ticks on negotiations and a series of essential decisions dictated by the city’s land use review process, it is unclear what steps the de Blasio administration might take to make a deal happen, advance a key project, and avoid a potentially significant political defeat.</p> <p>BFC Partners is the developer selected through a competitive bidding process run by the New York City Economic Development Corporation. The initial request for proposals (RFP) was put out in October 2013, prior to Mayor Bill de Blasio taking office, and the project was awarded to BFC in December 2015. Over the next year, the project became a source of significant controversy and become a burning issue in this year’s District 35 City Council race, where Cumbo was running for reelection. It has also become a symbol of the de Blasio administration’s strategy for creating affordable housing across the city and a sore spot and political vulnerability for the mayor, a fellow Democrat who did not endorse Cumbo but sent behind-the-scenes support for her campaign.</p> <p>The redevelopment proposal envisions converting the armory -- which spans an entire city block and sits defunct -- into an affordable recreation center, 330 rental housing units at various levels of affordability, and 56 condominiums to be sold.</p> <p>Of the 330 rental units, 164 would be market rate while the rest would be “affordable” for low-income and middle-income families, whereby rents are capped so that tenants pay no more than 30 percent of their income to the landlord. Affordability is calculated according to the 2016 Area Median Income (AMI) of $81,600 for a family of three. The rental units would include 18 units at 40 percent AMI; 49 units at 50 percent AMI; and 99 units at 110 percent AMI, providing rent regulated apartments to households of various income levels.</p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/reset_1/screen-shot-2017-10-03-at-11.22.jpg" alt="AMI apartments Bedford Union Armory" width="400" height="140" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></p> <p>Of the condos, 44 would be sold at market rate and 12 at 120 percent AMI. BFC Partners would receive a 99-year ground lease on a majority of the site, recouping its costs through sales of the condos, rents on the apartments, fees from the recreation center, and a developer fee from the city.</p> <p>De Blasio has pitched the project as a much-needed community facility, similar to the Park Slope Armory recreation center, which can be kept affordable in the long-term under the current structure of the plan, with the benefit of creating affordable housing. As it stands, the project does not include any housing subsidies that the administration has used in the past to create more affordability in land use redevelopments. At a September 14 news conference, de Blasio indicated openness to adding more subsidies, though he was noncommittal as to what the city might do to sweeten the deal.</p> <p>“[W]e want that to be the best possible project for the community, we're going to look at every way to improve it,” he told reporters, noting that the current plan allows for the recreation center to be affordable on an ongoing basis. “That's what we need to come out of this in the end. But we’re going to work with the Council member to see if there is a way to improve the project that would win her support and be more comfortable for the community.”</p> <p>Cumbo, the Council member de Blasio referred to, recently won the primary for her reelection effort against an opponent who put the Bedford Union Armory at the core of the campaign, accusing Cumbo of being too close to real estate developers and ineffective at stemming the gentrification and displacement sweeping the changing district. Cumbo faced criticism for dithering about the project for months only to oppose it earlier this year, but came to draw a line in the sand on the project. Without her approval, the project is dead on arrival at the City Council, which traditionally votes with the local member on land use applications and will have 50 days to evaluate the deal once it is referred by the City Planning Commission, perhaps with adjustments, unless it is taken completely off the table by then.</p> <p>Cumbo was not made available to comment for this article. Her spokesperson, Kristia Beaubrun, referred Gotham Gazette to the Council member’s statement in May when she came out against the proposal.</p> <p>"Since the very beginning our message has been clear: We will not allow public land to be used for the purpose of luxury condominiums,” she said, calling on the mayor to “go back to the drawing board and produce a plan that meets the needs of my Brooklyn neighbors.”</p> <p>Last month, Borough President Adams, as part of the Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) required of all such proposals, rejected the project and recommended that the city increase the number of deeply affordable units and also provide more upper-tier affordable housing units to offset the costs of running the recreation center.</p> <p>Adams also called for more permanent affordability -- currently, 30 percent of the units are permanently affordable -- and for 20 percent of the rental apartments to be allotted to the Department of Housing Preservation and Development’s “Our Space Initiative” for housing homeless families. “This is our opportunity to get this right,” he said. “This process has gone through years of debate, emotions, and public scrutiny, both for and against the development. We must ultimately come together and find the right balance that is the ideal solution for the future of Crown Heights, and for the optimal reuse of the Bedford Union Armory as a public resource.”</p> <p>The proposal is currently before the City Planning Commission, which will hold a public review session on Wednesday before voting on the project later this month. The CPC can either approve the project, with or without changes, and send it to the City Council for further review, or it can reject it, although that would be shocking and especially rare.</p> <p>“It’s hard for me to imagine tweaks at this stage that would address the concerns being raised,” said Emily Goldstein, senior campaign organizer at the Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development. Goldstein, who is not involved in the community efforts around the armory, said the administration isn’t taking full advantage of the city’s ownership of the land, which allows it to demand more benefits than it could if the project were on a privately-owned site. “There are broader concerns about wanting lasting community control,” she said.</p> <p>Goldstein hits at the heart of the opposition to the project by community activists. The Our Armory Coalition, a group that includes the Crown Heights Tenant Union, New York Communities for Change, Picture the Homeless, The Black Institute, The Legal Aid Society, and others, have called for a community land trust to develop the project, rather than a private firm. That would allow community voices to drive decisions on the property in the community interest, rather than effectively giving a for-profit developer a century-long hold over public property.</p> <p>“The RFP process for the Bedford Armory has been flawed and corrupt from the very start,” said the coalition, in a statement last month, calling for the project to be scrapped entirely and for the city to issue a new request for proposals. “Elected officials including Cumbo are [sic] failed to address the fact that BFC is a for profit developer, making money off our public land while not providing real affordability to the community. And that’s unacceptable.”</p> <p>“I don’t see any reason it shouldn’t be explored,” said ANHD’s Goldstein of a community land trust, also insisting that it isn’t the only option available. “There are other ways to build in the idea that public land is a public resource that should remain public. I think there’s a flaw in the calculus the city is using.”</p> <p>She acknowledged that deeper affordability would require more city subsidies and that BFC’s application may have been the most attractive proposal. But, she said, “It’s shortsighted to do what’s cheaper in the short term. What you lose in the long term is permanent affordability. It’s hard to start from where they are and make it more affordable.”</p> <p>One housing expert said the city is trying to save as much money as possible, and any subsidies applied to the Bedford Union Armory would mean not being able to use them in other neighborhoods. “The city likes to think of itself as a negotiator on the community side but they’re really not, they’re really just a broker,” said the expert said, who requested anonymity to speak more freely and pointed out that the hurdles to the Bedford Armory project stem from the city’s “deal-by-deal approach” to development, which allows community advocates to pressure the administration with an all-or-nothing opposition rather than pushing for compromise.</p> <p>That’s the case with the Our Armory coalition. Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change and a strident critic of the administration on its housing policies, is adamant that the only way the project could be acceptable to his group is if there are no luxury condos or market-rate rental units. “They could force the developer off the project and make it 100 percent affordable since it’s on public land,” he said. “Using public land to build luxury housing is a travesty.”</p> <p>Although issuing a new RFP for the project, and triggering another round of ULURP, could potentially take years, Westin said it would be worth it. “It’s better than a gentrification project that would displace the community.”</p> <p>Westin also pushed back against the argument that the condos are being used to cross-subsidize the recreation center. A BFC spokesperson earlier told Gotham Gazette that the firm will make a net profit of less than $800,000 from the sale of the condos and that those funds would be put back into the recreation center. The spokesperson also said that the annual cash-flow from all the rental units, which are expensive to operate and maintain, would be around $800,000. Citing Borough President Adams’ recommendations, the spokesperson pointed out that removing the revenue-generating component of the project would require other funds to fill the gap, while noting that the original RFP for the project specified that the developer should not request any housing subsidies from the city.</p> <p>“This cross-subsidization frame is what luxury developers use to justify luxury development,” Westin said. Instead, he said the city could designate the armory as a land bank and set restrictions on the land, which could then be developed by a nonprofit developer. “It’s completely feasible to do this project 100 percent affordable,” he said.</p> <p>The project does have its supporters. Geoffrey Davis, a Democratic district leader from Crown Heights, emphasized that the recreation center was a necessity for the community. “Our seniors, our young people, our community will have a place to go to,” he said in a phone interview. “I say, continue to negotiate, work it out. Do not leave the table. If you say kill the deal and walk away, we’re talking about another 30 years.”</p> <p>

***
by Samar Khurshid, Senior reporter, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
Don’t Endanger Minority Jobs in Name of Construction Safety 2017-09-04T04:00:00+00:00 2017-09-04T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/130-opinion/7172-don-t-endanger-minority-jobs-in-name-of-construction-safety Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/bp_eric_adams.jpg" alt="bp eric adams" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p>Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, left, the author (photo: @BPEricAdams)</p> <hr /> <p>It’s good to see our city engaged in a long-overdue discussion about safety on construction sites. “Safety first” is not mere sloganeering to me; nothing should top ensuring the health and welfare of every man and woman on every worksite.</p> <p>The City Council has tackled and passed a number of meaningful reforms in recent months, and there is certainly more to explore. However, New Yorkers have good reason to be concerned about a bill known as Intro. 1447, which would likely sideline many local workers of color and prevent growing minority- and women-owned business enterprises (M/WBEs) from succeeding in the construction industry.</p> <p>An earlier draft of this legislation would have required apprenticeships for construction workers; the current version being considered by the Council would necessitate a training requirement well in excess of the existing federal minimum standard set by OSHA. Either of these proposals would essentially result in a union mandate. I support unions and I am a longtime union man, dating back to my 22 years of service in the NYPD. But as I have noted in the past, my union pride also carries with it a responsibility to speak out when I believe there is inequity of opportunity within the ranks of my brothers and sisters in labor. In the construction industry, this largely remains the case, with several exceptions such as Carpenters Local 926.</p> <p>The reality is that while some important gains have been made, I see from my own experience that union construction sites continue to fall short in reflecting the diversity of New York City. Equally important, too many of the union workers on Brooklyn’s construction sites do not actually live in our borough, or any of the five boroughs.</p> <p>While construction unions have promoted apprenticeships and additional skills training as both a path to safer worksites and a way to diversify their workforce, no independent data has been released that shows the linkages for these claims. There is still no evidence that these efforts are providing minority workers with a reliable road to long-term career advancement. While apprenticeship programs may become more diverse, the higher-paying jobs on actual union worksites still elude the minority workforce. Until that changes, we should remain wary of approving de facto union mandates on construction sites that could otherwise provide much-needed job opportunities for highly-qualified New Yorkers of color, especially those living in public housing seeking a path to the middle class.</p> <p>When it comes to M/WBE contractors, Intro. 1447 would have a very damaging impact because of the extremely high cost of its arbitrary training mandate. As City Council members should know, M/WBEs in the construction industry are generally smaller and less established than their competitors. If costs were to skyrocket, many M/WBEs would likely be unable to afford the difference, making it virtually impossible to compete for the jobs they need to stay in business. We must avoid any outcome that bars these hardworking small business owners from getting a fair shot in our city.</p> <p>There is a strong argument that a universal enforcement of OSHA training certification requirements would be just as effective, and in some cases more so. We have seen that projects following strict standards on OSHA training — whether they be union or non-union — maintain safer sites and have fewer injuries. This would be a substantive step forward for safety.</p> <p>I have sought to reframe the union construction conversation around the idea of job creation for all. It is only worth fighting for higher construction wages and good jobs when we ensure that all workers, including those who continue to fall through the inequality gap, are sharing equally in those victories. Now we also need to do the same thing for construction safety. There is no question that we need to make worksites safer, but it must be safer for all workers — and that means we must have an industry in which workers of all backgrounds have equal opportunity to participate and prosper.</p> <p>*** <br />Eric L. Adams is the Brooklyn borough president. On Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/BPEricAdams" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@BPEricAdams</a>.</p> <p>

***
Have an op-ed idea or submission for Gotham Gazette? Email opinion@gothamgazette.com

</p>
<p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/bp_eric_adams.jpg" alt="bp eric adams" width="600" height="450" /></p> <p>Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, left, the author (photo: @BPEricAdams)</p> <hr /> <p>It’s good to see our city engaged in a long-overdue discussion about safety on construction sites. “Safety first” is not mere sloganeering to me; nothing should top ensuring the health and welfare of every man and woman on every worksite.</p> <p>The City Council has tackled and passed a number of meaningful reforms in recent months, and there is certainly more to explore. However, New Yorkers have good reason to be concerned about a bill known as Intro. 1447, which would likely sideline many local workers of color and prevent growing minority- and women-owned business enterprises (M/WBEs) from succeeding in the construction industry.</p> <p>An earlier draft of this legislation would have required apprenticeships for construction workers; the current version being considered by the Council would necessitate a training requirement well in excess of the existing federal minimum standard set by OSHA. Either of these proposals would essentially result in a union mandate. I support unions and I am a longtime union man, dating back to my 22 years of service in the NYPD. But as I have noted in the past, my union pride also carries with it a responsibility to speak out when I believe there is inequity of opportunity within the ranks of my brothers and sisters in labor. In the construction industry, this largely remains the case, with several exceptions such as Carpenters Local 926.</p> <p>The reality is that while some important gains have been made, I see from my own experience that union construction sites continue to fall short in reflecting the diversity of New York City. Equally important, too many of the union workers on Brooklyn’s construction sites do not actually live in our borough, or any of the five boroughs.</p> <p>While construction unions have promoted apprenticeships and additional skills training as both a path to safer worksites and a way to diversify their workforce, no independent data has been released that shows the linkages for these claims. There is still no evidence that these efforts are providing minority workers with a reliable road to long-term career advancement. While apprenticeship programs may become more diverse, the higher-paying jobs on actual union worksites still elude the minority workforce. Until that changes, we should remain wary of approving de facto union mandates on construction sites that could otherwise provide much-needed job opportunities for highly-qualified New Yorkers of color, especially those living in public housing seeking a path to the middle class.</p> <p>When it comes to M/WBE contractors, Intro. 1447 would have a very damaging impact because of the extremely high cost of its arbitrary training mandate. As City Council members should know, M/WBEs in the construction industry are generally smaller and less established than their competitors. If costs were to skyrocket, many M/WBEs would likely be unable to afford the difference, making it virtually impossible to compete for the jobs they need to stay in business. We must avoid any outcome that bars these hardworking small business owners from getting a fair shot in our city.</p> <p>There is a strong argument that a universal enforcement of OSHA training certification requirements would be just as effective, and in some cases more so. We have seen that projects following strict standards on OSHA training — whether they be union or non-union — maintain safer sites and have fewer injuries. This would be a substantive step forward for safety.</p> <p>I have sought to reframe the union construction conversation around the idea of job creation for all. It is only worth fighting for higher construction wages and good jobs when we ensure that all workers, including those who continue to fall through the inequality gap, are sharing equally in those victories. Now we also need to do the same thing for construction safety. There is no question that we need to make worksites safer, but it must be safer for all workers — and that means we must have an industry in which workers of all backgrounds have equal opportunity to participate and prosper.</p> <p>*** <br />Eric L. Adams is the Brooklyn borough president. On Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/BPEricAdams" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@BPEricAdams</a>.</p> <p>

***
Have an op-ed idea or submission for Gotham Gazette? Email opinion@gothamgazette.com

</p>
Max & Murphy on Politics - Podcast 2017-06-25T04:00:00+00:00 2017-06-25T04:00:00+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/podcasts/max-murphy-on-politics Ben Max <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette, and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p>Max &amp; Murphy on Politics is a podcast hosted by Ben Max of Gotham Gazette and Jarrett Murphy of City Limits. It began in 2016 focused on housing policy and politics when those issues were front and center to city and state politics and government, but it has expanded since. Now, in 2017, we are focused on the city election cycle, heading toward the September primary and November general elections. Find episodes through the links below, or find Max &amp; Murphy wherever you get your podcasts: iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, etc.</p> <p>Our election coverage began with an overview and preview episode June 1. Then we started to talk with mayoral candidates, with Democrat Bob Gangi on June 12 and Republican Paul Massey June 19. We're following those with Democrat Sal Albanese June 26 and we'll continue from there, also featuring episodes with other political figures and candidates for other offices. Have feedback? Find us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@jarrettmurphy</a>.</p> <table style="width: 600px;" cellspacing="3" cellpadding="3"> <tbody><!-- --> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8072-max-murphy-podcast-bail-reform-with-assemblymember-latrice-walker" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/latrice-walker-wbai-400.jpg" alt="latrice walker wbai 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8072-max-murphy-podcast-bail-reform-with-assemblymember-latrice-walker" target="_blank">Bail Reform with Assemblymember Latrice Walker</a> — November 14, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8071-max-murphy-podcast-senate-democratic-leader-andrea-stewart-cousins-election-aftermath" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/asc_andreastewartcousinswbai-400.jpg" alt="asc andreastewartcousinswbai 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8071-max-murphy-podcast-senate-democratic-leader-andrea-stewart-cousins-election-aftermath" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Senate Democratic Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins</a> — November 14, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8055-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-2018-election-results" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/alyssa-katz-wbai-400.jpg" alt="Analyzing 2018 Election Results &amp; Looking Ahead to 2019, with Alyssa Katz of The Daily News" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8055-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-2018-election-results" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Analyzing 2018 Election Results &amp; Looking Ahead to 2019, with Alyssa Katz of The Daily News</a> — November 7, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8054-max-murphy-podcast-election-day-live-show-with-special-guests" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/jumm-williams-1.jpg" alt="Election Day Live Show with Special Guests including Jumaane Williams &amp; Errol Louis" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8054-max-murphy-podcast-election-day-live-show-with-special-guests" target="_blank">Election Day Live Show with Special Guests including Jumaane Williams &amp; Errol Louis</a> — November 6, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8034-max-murphy-podcast-minor-party-candidates-for-comptroller-attorney-general" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/voting_line_in_brooklyn.jpg" alt="voting line in brooklyn" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8034-max-murphy-podcast-minor-party-candidates-for-comptroller-attorney-general" target="_blank" rel="noopener">'Minor Party' Candidates for Comptroller &amp; Attorney General</a> — October 31, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8015-max-murphy-podcast-cuomo-molinaro-debate-analysis" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/cuomo-molinaro-debate-400.jpg" alt="Cuomo-Molinaro Debate Analysis" width="400" height="198" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8015-max-murphy-podcast-cuomo-molinaro-debate-analysis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Cuomo-Molinaro Debate Analysis</a> — October 23, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8014-max-murphy-podcast-u-s-rep-dan-donovan" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/us-rep-dd-400.jpg" alt="U.S. Rep. Dan Donovan" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8014-max-murphy-podcast-u-s-rep-dan-donovan" target="_blank" rel="noopener">U.S. Rep. Dan Donovan</a> — October 23, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7998-max-murphy-podcast-battle-for-control-of-the-state-senate" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mg-td-wbai-400.jpg" alt="Michael Gianaris Thomas Doherty WBAI" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7998-max-murphy-podcast-battle-for-control-of-the-state-senate" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Battle for Control of the State Senate</a> — October 10, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7986-max-murphy-podcast-larry-sharpe-libertarian-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/larry-sharpe-wbai-400.jpg" alt="larry sharpe wbai 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7986-max-murphy-podcast-larry-sharpe-libertarian-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Larry Sharpe, Libertarian nominee for Governor</a> — October 10, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7985-max-murphy-podcast-republican-attorney-general-nominee-keith-wofford" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/keith-wofford-wbai-400-2.jpg" alt="keith wofford wbai 400 2" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7985-max-murphy-podcast-republican-attorney-general-nominee-keith-wofford" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Republican Attorney General Nominee Keith Wofford</a> — October 10, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7975-max-murphy-podcast-comptroller-tom-dinapoli" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/tom-dinapoli-400.jpg" alt="tom dinapoli 400" width="400" height="267" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7975-max-murphy-podcast-comptroller-tom-dinapoli" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Comptroller Tom DiNapoli</a> — October 3, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7974-max-murphy-podcast-jonathan-trichter-republican-nominee-for-comptroller" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/john-trichter-130.jpg" alt="john trichter 130" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7974-max-murphy-podcast-jonathan-trichter-republican-nominee-for-comptroller" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Jonathan Trichter, Republican nominee for Comptroller</a> — October 3, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7958-max-murphy-podcast-stephanie-miner-serve-america-movement-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/stephanie-miner-400px.jpg" alt="stephanie miner 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7958-max-murphy-podcast-stephanie-miner-serve-america-movement-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Stephanie Miner, Serve America Movement Nominee for Governor</a> — September 26, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7959-max-murphy-podcast-howie-hawkins-green-party-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/hawkins_2010t.jpg" alt="Howie Hawkins, Green Party Nominee for Governor" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7959-max-murphy-podcast-howie-hawkins-green-party-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Howie Hawkins, Green Party Nominee for Governor</a> — September 26, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7941-max-murphy-podcast-marc-molinaro-republican-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/marc-molinaro-pod400.jpg" alt="marc molinaro pod400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7941-max-murphy-podcast-marc-molinaro-republican-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Marc Molinaro, Republican Nominee for Governor</a>&nbsp;— September 19, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7942-max-murphy-podcast-primary-post-mortem-with-rebecca-katz-top-cynthia-nixon-strategist" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/rebecca-katz-400.jpg" alt="rebecca katz 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7942-max-murphy-podcast-primary-post-mortem-with-rebecca-katz-top-cynthia-nixon-strategist" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Primary Post-Mortem with Top Cynthia Nixon Strategist</a>&nbsp;— September 19, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7929-max-murphy-podcast-2018-primary-day-is-here" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/primary-day-sept-400.jpg" alt="primary day sept 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7929-max-murphy-podcast-2018-primary-day-is-here" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Primary Day Is Here</a> — September 12, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7913-max-murphy-podcast-final-days-of-the-lieutenant-governor-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/podcast-hocul-williams-400.jpg" alt="Final Days of the Lieutenant Governor Primary between Kathy Hochul &amp; Jumaane Williams" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7913-max-murphy-podcast-final-days-of-the-lieutenant-governor-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Final Days of the Lieutenant Governor Primary between Kathy Hochul &amp; Jumaane Williams</a> — September 5, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7897-max-murphy-podcast-an-intense-queens-senate-primary-with-jessica-ramos-and-senator-jose-peralta" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/podcast-ramos-perlata-400.jpg" alt="Intense Queens Senate Primary Centers on Delivering for Immigrant Communities, with Jessica Ramos &amp; State Senator Jose Peralta" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7897-max-murphy-podcast-an-intense-queens-senate-primary-with-jessica-ramos-and-senator-jose-peralta" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Intense Queens Senate Primary Centers on Delivering for Immigrant Communities, with Jessica Ramos &amp; State Senator Jose Peralta</a> — August 30, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7881-max-murphy-podcast-race-politics-in-ten-years-since-obama-s-nomination" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/christine-greer-400.jpg" alt="christine greer 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7881-max-murphy-podcast-race-politics-in-ten-years-since-obama-s-nomination" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Race &amp; Politics in Ten Years Since Obama's NominationRace &amp; Politics in Ten Years Since Obama's Nomination</a> — August 22, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7880-max-murphy-podcast-preparing-for-primary-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mara-gay-400.jpg" alt="mara gay 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7880-max-murphy-podcast-preparing-for-primary-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Preparing for Primary DayMax &amp; Murphy Podcast: Preparing for Primary Day</a> — August 22, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7869-max-murphy-podcast-central-brooklyn-senate-primary-tests-idc-awareness" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/myrie-hamilton-400.jpg" alt="myrie hamilton 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7869-max-murphy-podcast-central-brooklyn-senate-primary-tests-idc-awareness" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Central Brooklyn Senate Primary Tests IDC Awareness (with Zellnor Myrie and Senator Jesse Hamilton)</a> — August 15, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7850-max-murphy-podcast-queens-state-senate-rematch-features-different-kinds-of-democrat" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/tony-avella-john-liu-wbai-400.jpg" alt="Queens State Senate Rematch Features Different Kinds of Democrats (with Senator Tony Avella and challenger John Liu)" width="400" height="206" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7850-max-murphy-podcast-queens-state-senate-rematch-features-different-kinds-of-democrat" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Queens State Senate Rematch Features Different Kinds of Democrats (with Senator Tony Avella and challenger John Liu)</a> — August 8, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7849-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-sean-patrick-maloney" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/sean-patrick-maloney-wbai-podcast-400.jpg" alt="Attorney General Candidate Sean Patrick Maloney" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7849-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-sean-patrick-maloney" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Attorney General Candidate Sean Patrick Maloney</a> — August 8, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7836-max-murphy-podcast-manhattan-state-senate-rematch-centered-on-breakaway-democrats" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/marisol-alcantara-robert-jackson-state-400.jpg" alt="marisol alcantara robert jackson state 400" width="400" height="201" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7836-max-murphy-podcast-manhattan-state-senate-rematch-centered-on-breakaway-democrats" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Manhattan State Senate Rematch Centered on Breakaway Democrats</a>&nbsp;— August 1, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7824-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-leecia-eve" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/leecia-eve-400px.jpg" alt="leecia eve 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7824-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-leecia-eve" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Attorney General Candidate Leecia Eve</a>&nbsp;— July 25, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7812-max-murphy-podcast-letitia-james-the-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/tish-james-400px.jpg" alt="tish james 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7812-max-murphy-podcast-letitia-james-the-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Letitia James &amp; the Attorney General Primary</a>&nbsp;— July 18, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7791-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-zephyr-teachout" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/zephyr-teachout-400.jpg" alt="zephyr teachout 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7791-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-zephyr-teachout" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Attorney General Candidate Zephyr Teachout</a>&nbsp;— July 9, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7767-max-murphy-podcast-the-long-fight-for-new-city-sexual-harassment-laws" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/rosenthal-holtzman-pod-400.jpg" alt="rosenthal holtzman pod 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7767-max-murphy-podcast-the-long-fight-for-new-city-sexual-harassment-laws" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Long Fight for New City Sexual Harassment Laws</a>&nbsp;— June 25, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7751-max-murphy-podcast-a-new-era-at-the-mta" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/gelinas-477.jpg" alt="gelinas 477" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7751-max-murphy-podcast-a-new-era-at-the-mta" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A New Era at The MTA? with Nicole Gelinas</a>&nbsp;— June 21, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7737-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-kathy-hochul" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/kathy-hochul-400.jpg" alt="Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7737-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-kathy-hochul" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul</a>&nbsp;— June 14, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7712-max-murphy-podcast-criminal-justice-reform-in-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/fortune-society-reps-for-400.jpg" alt="fortune society reps for 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7712-max-murphy-podcast-criminal-justice-reform-in-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Criminal Justice Reform in New York</a>&nbsp;— June 5, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7707-max-murphy-podcast-senate-democratic-leader-andrea-stewart-cousins" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2016/andrea-s-c-pod-400px.jpg" alt="Senate Democratic Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7707-max-murphy-podcast-senate-democratic-leader-andrea-stewart-cousins" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Senate Democratic Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins</a>&nbsp;— June 1, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7692-max-murphy-podcast-state-party-conventions-nominations" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo-400px.jpg" alt="mxm logo 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7692-max-murphy-podcast-state-party-conventions-nominations" target="_blank" rel="noopener">State Party Conventions &amp; Nominations</a>&nbsp;— May 25, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7673-max-murphy-podcast-stephanie-miner-syracuse-mayor-cuomo" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/pod-steph-miner-400-163.jpg" alt="pod steph miner 400 163" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7673-max-murphy-podcast-stephanie-miner-syracuse-mayor-cuomo" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Stephanie Miner</a>&nbsp;— May 15, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7659-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-joe-borelli" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/joe-borelli-podcast-map-400.jpg" alt="joe borelli podcast map 400" width="400" height="315" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7659-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-joe-borelli" target="_blank" rel="noopener">City Council Member Joe Borelli</a>&nbsp;— May 7, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/eric-adams-m-m-pod-400px.jpg" alt="eric adams m m pod 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams</a>&nbsp;— May 1, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7632-max-murphy-podcast-political-purity-tests-in-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/m-m-stanley-fritz-citizen-action-400px.jpg" alt="Stanley fritz citizen action 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7632-max-murphy-podcast-political-purity-tests-in-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Political Purity Tests in New York</a>&nbsp;— April 25, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7617-max-murphy-podcast-reforming-special-elections-more-in-albany" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/susan-lerner-cc-ny-400px.jpg" alt="susan lerner cc ny 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7617-max-murphy-podcast-reforming-special-elections-more-in-albany" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reforming Special Elections &amp; More in Albany</a>&nbsp;— April 17, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7597-max-murphy-suing-nycha" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/suing-nycha-400.jpg" alt="suing nycha 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7597-max-murphy-suing-nycha" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Suing NYCHA</a>&nbsp;— April 10, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7583-max-murphy-podcast-molinaro-launches-campaign-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/marc-molinaro400px.jpg" alt="Marc Molinaro Launches Campaign for Governor" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7583-max-murphy-podcast-molinaro-launches-campaign-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Molinaro Launches Campaign for Governor</a>&nbsp;— April 2, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7568-max-murphy-podcast-chirlane-mccray" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/ch-mccray-400px.jpg" alt="Chirlane McCray" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7568-max-murphy-podcast-chirlane-mccray" target="_blank" rel="noopener">First Lady Chirlane McCray</a>&nbsp;— March 26, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7548-max-murphy-podcast-michelle-de-la-uz" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/michelle-de-la-uz-400.jpg" alt="michelle de la uz 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7548-max-murphy-podcast-michelle-de-la-uz" target="_blank" rel="noopener">City Planning Commissioner Michelle de la Uz</a>&nbsp;— March 19, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7536-max-murphy-podcast-a-journalist-runs-for-state-senate" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/ross-barkan-senate400.jpg" alt="ross barkan senate" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7536-max-murphy-podcast-a-journalist-runs-for-state-senate" target="_blank">A Journalist Runs for State Senate</a>&nbsp;— March 13, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7517-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-s-progress-fighting-homelessness" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/bdb-homelessness-400.jpg" alt="De Blasio's Progress Fighting Homelessness" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7517-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-s-progress-fighting-homelessness" target="_blank" rel="noopener">De Blasio's Progress Fighting Homelessness</a>&nbsp;— March 5, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7494-max-murphy-podcast-idc-challengers-robert-jackson-jessica-ramos" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/ramos-jackson-podcast.jpg" alt="ramos jackson podcast" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7494-max-murphy-podcast-idc-challengers-robert-jackson-jessica-ramos" target="_blank" rel="noopener">IDC Challengers Robert Jackson &amp; Jessica Ramos</a>&nbsp;— February 26, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7490-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-candidate-jumaane-williams" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/jumanne-williams-pod-400.jpg" alt="Jumaane Williams" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7490-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-candidate-jumaane-williams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Lieutenant Governor Candidate Jumaane Williams</a>&nbsp;— February 23, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7478-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-de-blasio-s-state-of-the-city-address" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/feb14-podcast.jpg" alt="feb14 podcast" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7478-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-de-blasio-s-state-of-the-city-address" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Analyzing De Blasio's State of the City Address</a>&nbsp;— February 14, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7462-max-murphy-podcast-deconstructing-de-blasio-s-visit-to-albany" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/3kall-pod-400.jpg" alt="Deconstructing De Blasio's Visit to Albany" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7462-max-murphy-podcast-deconstructing-de-blasio-s-visit-to-albany" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Deconstructing De Blasio's Visit to Albany</a>&nbsp;— January 30, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7448-max-murphy-podcast-education-in-de-blasio-s-second-term" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/bdb-mayor-hearing-400px.jpg" alt="bdb mayor hearing 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7448-max-murphy-podcast-education-in-de-blasio-s-second-term" target="_blank" rel="noopener">De Blasio's 2nd Term Focus on Education</a>&nbsp;— January 30, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7433-max-murphy-podcast-congestion-pricing-with-alex-matthiessen-of-move-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/alex-matthiessen-move-ny-400.jpg" alt="alex matthiessen move ny 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7433-max-murphy-podcast-congestion-pricing-with-alex-matthiessen-of-move-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Congestion Pricing with Alex Matthiessen of Move New York</a>&nbsp;— January 22, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7426-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-ritchie-torres-on-the-new-council-his-new-role" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/ritchie-torres-400px.jpg" alt="ritchie torres 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7426-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-ritchie-torres-on-the-new-council-his-new-role" target="_blank" rel="noopener">City Council Member Ritchie Torres on The New Council &amp; His New Role</a>&nbsp;— January 17, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7413-max-murphy-podcast-new-city-council-members-justin-brannan-carlina-rivera" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/rivera-brannan-400x167.jpg" alt="rivera brannan 400x167" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7413-max-murphy-podcast-new-city-council-members-justin-brannan-carlina-rivera" target="_blank" rel="noopener">New City Council Members Justin Brannan &amp; Carlina Rivera</a>&nbsp;— January 10, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7400-max-murphy-big-political-news-to-start-2018" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/bdb400px.jpg" alt="bdb400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7400-max-murphy-big-political-news-to-start-2018" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Big Political News to Start 2018</a>&nbsp;— January 3, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7383-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-speaker-melissa-mark-viverito" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/melissa-mark-viverito-alatriste-podium400.jpg" alt="melissa mark viverito alatriste podium400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7383-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-speaker-melissa-mark-viverito" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito</a>&nbsp;— December 15, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7363-max-murphy-podcast-eric-koch-former-city-council-communications-director" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/eric-koch-400.jpg" alt="eric koch 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7363-max-murphy-podcast-eric-koch-former-city-council-communications-director" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Eric Koch, former City Council communications director</a>&nbsp;— December 15, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7355-max-murphy-podcast-nycha-ceo-shola-olatoye" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/shola-olayote-400.jpg" alt="Shola Olayote" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7355-max-murphy-podcast-nycha-ceo-shola-olatoye" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">NYCHA CEO Shola Olatoye</a>&nbsp;— December 7, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7348-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-elizabeth-crowley" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/liz-crowley-podcast-400.jpg" alt="liz crowley podcast 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7348-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-elizabeth-crowley" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">City Council Member Elizabeth Crowley</a>&nbsp;— December 5, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7337-max-murphy-podcast-previewing-de-blasio-s-second-term" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/bill_de_blasio_2nd_term_400px.jpg" alt="bill de blasio 2nd term 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7337-max-murphy-podcast-previewing-de-blasio-s-second-term" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Previewing de Blasio's 2nd term</a>&nbsp;— November 27, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7308-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-election-results" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/bdb-voting-sign-in-400.jpg" alt="bdb voting sign in 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7308-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-election-results" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Analyzing the 2017 Election Results</a>&nbsp;— November 9, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7301-max-murphy-podcast-10-things-to-think-about-on-election-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/mayor-bdb-400.jpg" alt="mayor bdb 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7301-max-murphy-podcast-10-things-to-think-about-on-election-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">10 Things to Think About on Election Day</a>&nbsp;— November 7, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7292-max-murphy-podcast-resetting-the-mayoral-race-after-the-final-debate" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/mayoral-candidates-400.jpg" alt="mayoral candidates 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7292-max-murphy-podcast-resetting-the-mayoral-race-after-the-final-debate" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Resetting the Mayoral Race after the Final Debate</a>&nbsp;— November 3, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7269-max-murphy-podcast-akeem-browder-aaron-commey-mike-tolkin-are-running-for-mayor" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/3-mayors-stream.jpg" alt="3 mayors stream" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7269-max-murphy-podcast-akeem-browder-aaron-commey-mike-tolkin-are-running-for-mayor" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Akeem Browder, Aaron Commey &amp; Mike Tolkin are Running for Mayor</a>&nbsp;— October 23, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7259-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-the-public-advocate-comptroller-debates" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/brigid-at-debate-nyc-votesstream.jpg" alt="brigid at debate nyc votesstream" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7259-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-the-public-advocate-comptroller-debates" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Analyzing the Public Advocate &amp; Comptroller Debates</a>&nbsp;— October 19, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7243-max-murphy-analyzing-the-first-general-election-mayoral-debate" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/debate-stage400.jpg" alt="debate stage400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7243-max-murphy-analyzing-the-first-general-election-mayoral-debate" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Analyzing the First General Election Mayoral Debate</a>&nbsp;— October 11, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7229-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-letitia-james" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/tish-james400.jpg" alt="tish james400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7229-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-letitia-james" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Public Advocate Letitia James</a>&nbsp;— October 2, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7219-max-murphy-podcast-comptroller-candidate-michel-faulkner" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/michel-faulkner400.jpg" alt="Michel faulkner" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7219-max-murphy-podcast-comptroller-candidate-michel-faulkner" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Comptroller candidate Michel Faulkner</a>&nbsp;— September 29, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7201-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-jc-polanco" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/jcpolanco-400.jpg" alt="jcpolanco 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7201-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-jc-polanco" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Public Advocate Candidate JC Polanco</a>&nbsp;— September 18, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7186-max-murphy-podcast-a-candidates-final-hours-of-a-campaign" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/gifford-miller-city-council-400px.jpg" alt="gifford miller city council 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7186-max-murphy-podcast-a-candidates-final-hours-of-a-campaign" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Gifford Miller, former Speaker of the City Council and mayoral candidate</a>&nbsp;— September 11, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7173-max-murphy-podcast-previewing-primary-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/brigid-bergin-and-ben-max400px.jpg" alt="brigid bergin and ben max400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7173-max-murphy-podcast-previewing-primary-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Brigid Bergin of WNYC radio</a>&nbsp;— September 5, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7164-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-author-joseph-viteritti" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/cover-vitteri-stream2.jpg" alt="Joseph Viteritti" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7164-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-author-joseph-viteritti" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">De Blasio Author Joseph Viteritti</a>&nbsp;— August 30, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7158-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-david-eisenbach" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/public-adv-candidate-david-eisenbach400px.jpg" alt="Public advocate Candidate David Eisenbach" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7158-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-david-eisenbach" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Public advocate Candidate David Eisenbach</a>&nbsp;— August 28, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7135-max-murphy-podcast-azi-paybarah" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/azi-paybarah-tv-400px167px.jpg" alt="azi paybarah tv 400px167px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7135-max-murphy-podcast-azi-paybarah" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Azi Paybarah</a>&nbsp;— August 17, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7129-max-murphy-podcast-christina-greer-and-alexis-grenell" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/grenell-max-greer-400-167.png" alt="Dr. Christina Greer and Alexis Grenell" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7129-max-murphy-podcast-christina-greer-and-alexis-grenell" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Representative vs. Substantive Representation, with Dr. Christina Greer and Alexis Grenell</a>&nbsp;— August 15, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7098-max-murphy-podcast-the-mayoral-race-with-top-political-strategists" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"> <img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/max-murphy-katz-fullington-res.jpg" alt="max murphy katz fullington res" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7098-max-murphy-podcast-the-mayoral-race-with-top-political-strategists" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">The Mayoral Race with Top Political Strategists</a>&nbsp;— July 31, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <!-- Breaks --> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7080-max-murphy-podcast-mayoral-candidate-bo-dietl" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"> <img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/bo-dietl.jpg" alt="bo dietl" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7080-max-murphy-podcast-mayoral-candidate-bo-dietl" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Mayoral Candidate Bo Dietl</a>&nbsp;— July 24, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <!-- Breaks --> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7064-max-murphy-podcast-republican-mayoral-candidate-nicole-malliotakis" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/nicole-malliotakis.jpg" alt="nicole malliotakis" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7064-max-murphy-podcast-republican-mayoral-candidate-nicole-malliotakis" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Republican Mayoral Candidate Nicole Malliotaki</a>&nbsp;— July 13, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7033-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-press-secretary-eric-phillips" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/eric-phillips.jpg" alt="eric phillips" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7033-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-press-secretary-eric-phillips" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Eric Phillips, press secretary to Mayor Bill de Blasio</a>&nbsp;— July 5, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7030-max-murphy-podcast-democratic-mayoral-candidate-sal-albanese" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/sal-albanese.jpg" alt="sal albanese" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7030-max-murphy-podcast-democratic-mayoral-candidate-sal-albanese" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Democratic Mayoral Candidate Sal Albanese</a> — June 26, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7009-max-murphy-podcast-republican-mayoral-candidate-paul-massey" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/paul-massey.jpg" alt="paul massey" width="400" height="167" /></a>&nbsp;</td> <td> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7009-max-murphy-podcast-republican-mayoral-candidate-paul-massey">Republican Mayoral Candidate Paul Massey</a>&nbsp;— June 19, 2017 (note: Paul Massey dropped out of the mayoral race on June 28, though the episode is still worth listening to)</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6989-max-murphy-podcast-mayoral-candidate-bob-gangi" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/bob-gangi.jpg" alt="bob gangi" width="400" height="167" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6989-max-murphy-podcast-mayoral-candidate-bob-gangi">Democratic Mayoral Candidate Bob Gangi</a> — June 12, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo-400px.jpg" alt="mxm logo 400px" width="400" height="167" /></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6997-max-murphy-on-politics-election-season-is-here">Election Season is Here!</a> — June 1, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><br />A variety of earlier episodes of the Max &amp; Murphy Podcast, <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/6183-max-a-murphy-on-housing">through the&nbsp;archive</a>, often focused on New York housing policy and politics — <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/6183-max-a-murphy-on-housing">see all episodes from the start February 12, 2016 to May 25, 2017</a></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo.jpg" alt="mxm logo" width="600" height="239" /></p> <p>Ben Max, left, of Gotham Gazette, and Jarrett Murphy, right, of City Limits</p> <hr /> <p>Max &amp; Murphy on Politics is a podcast hosted by Ben Max of Gotham Gazette and Jarrett Murphy of City Limits. It began in 2016 focused on housing policy and politics when those issues were front and center to city and state politics and government, but it has expanded since. Now, in 2017, we are focused on the city election cycle, heading toward the September primary and November general elections. Find episodes through the links below, or find Max &amp; Murphy wherever you get your podcasts: iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, etc.</p> <p>Our election coverage began with an overview and preview episode June 1. Then we started to talk with mayoral candidates, with Democrat Bob Gangi on June 12 and Republican Paul Massey June 19. We're following those with Democrat Sal Albanese June 26 and we'll continue from there, also featuring episodes with other political figures and candidates for other offices. Have feedback? Find us on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/jarrettmurphy" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@jarrettmurphy</a>.</p> <table style="width: 600px;" cellspacing="3" cellpadding="3"> <tbody><!-- --> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8072-max-murphy-podcast-bail-reform-with-assemblymember-latrice-walker" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/latrice-walker-wbai-400.jpg" alt="latrice walker wbai 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8072-max-murphy-podcast-bail-reform-with-assemblymember-latrice-walker" target="_blank">Bail Reform with Assemblymember Latrice Walker</a> — November 14, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8071-max-murphy-podcast-senate-democratic-leader-andrea-stewart-cousins-election-aftermath" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/asc_andreastewartcousinswbai-400.jpg" alt="asc andreastewartcousinswbai 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8071-max-murphy-podcast-senate-democratic-leader-andrea-stewart-cousins-election-aftermath" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Senate Democratic Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins</a> — November 14, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8055-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-2018-election-results" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/alyssa-katz-wbai-400.jpg" alt="Analyzing 2018 Election Results &amp; Looking Ahead to 2019, with Alyssa Katz of The Daily News" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8055-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-2018-election-results" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Analyzing 2018 Election Results &amp; Looking Ahead to 2019, with Alyssa Katz of The Daily News</a> — November 7, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8054-max-murphy-podcast-election-day-live-show-with-special-guests" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/jumm-williams-1.jpg" alt="Election Day Live Show with Special Guests including Jumaane Williams &amp; Errol Louis" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8054-max-murphy-podcast-election-day-live-show-with-special-guests" target="_blank">Election Day Live Show with Special Guests including Jumaane Williams &amp; Errol Louis</a> — November 6, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8034-max-murphy-podcast-minor-party-candidates-for-comptroller-attorney-general" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/voting_line_in_brooklyn.jpg" alt="voting line in brooklyn" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8034-max-murphy-podcast-minor-party-candidates-for-comptroller-attorney-general" target="_blank" rel="noopener">'Minor Party' Candidates for Comptroller &amp; Attorney General</a> — October 31, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8015-max-murphy-podcast-cuomo-molinaro-debate-analysis" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/cuomo-molinaro-debate-400.jpg" alt="Cuomo-Molinaro Debate Analysis" width="400" height="198" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/8015-max-murphy-podcast-cuomo-molinaro-debate-analysis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Cuomo-Molinaro Debate Analysis</a> — October 23, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8014-max-murphy-podcast-u-s-rep-dan-donovan" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/us-rep-dd-400.jpg" alt="U.S. Rep. Dan Donovan" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8014-max-murphy-podcast-u-s-rep-dan-donovan" target="_blank" rel="noopener">U.S. Rep. Dan Donovan</a> — October 23, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7998-max-murphy-podcast-battle-for-control-of-the-state-senate" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mg-td-wbai-400.jpg" alt="Michael Gianaris Thomas Doherty WBAI" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7998-max-murphy-podcast-battle-for-control-of-the-state-senate" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Battle for Control of the State Senate</a> — October 10, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7986-max-murphy-podcast-larry-sharpe-libertarian-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/larry-sharpe-wbai-400.jpg" alt="larry sharpe wbai 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7986-max-murphy-podcast-larry-sharpe-libertarian-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Larry Sharpe, Libertarian nominee for Governor</a> — October 10, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7985-max-murphy-podcast-republican-attorney-general-nominee-keith-wofford" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/keith-wofford-wbai-400-2.jpg" alt="keith wofford wbai 400 2" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7985-max-murphy-podcast-republican-attorney-general-nominee-keith-wofford" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Republican Attorney General Nominee Keith Wofford</a> — October 10, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7975-max-murphy-podcast-comptroller-tom-dinapoli" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/tom-dinapoli-400.jpg" alt="tom dinapoli 400" width="400" height="267" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7975-max-murphy-podcast-comptroller-tom-dinapoli" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Comptroller Tom DiNapoli</a> — October 3, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7974-max-murphy-podcast-jonathan-trichter-republican-nominee-for-comptroller" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/john-trichter-130.jpg" alt="john trichter 130" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7974-max-murphy-podcast-jonathan-trichter-republican-nominee-for-comptroller" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Jonathan Trichter, Republican nominee for Comptroller</a> — October 3, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7958-max-murphy-podcast-stephanie-miner-serve-america-movement-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/stephanie-miner-400px.jpg" alt="stephanie miner 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7958-max-murphy-podcast-stephanie-miner-serve-america-movement-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Stephanie Miner, Serve America Movement Nominee for Governor</a> — September 26, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7959-max-murphy-podcast-howie-hawkins-green-party-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/hawkins_2010t.jpg" alt="Howie Hawkins, Green Party Nominee for Governor" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7959-max-murphy-podcast-howie-hawkins-green-party-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Howie Hawkins, Green Party Nominee for Governor</a> — September 26, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7941-max-murphy-podcast-marc-molinaro-republican-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/marc-molinaro-pod400.jpg" alt="marc molinaro pod400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7941-max-murphy-podcast-marc-molinaro-republican-nominee-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Marc Molinaro, Republican Nominee for Governor</a>&nbsp;— September 19, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7942-max-murphy-podcast-primary-post-mortem-with-rebecca-katz-top-cynthia-nixon-strategist" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/rebecca-katz-400.jpg" alt="rebecca katz 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7942-max-murphy-podcast-primary-post-mortem-with-rebecca-katz-top-cynthia-nixon-strategist" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Primary Post-Mortem with Top Cynthia Nixon Strategist</a>&nbsp;— September 19, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7929-max-murphy-podcast-2018-primary-day-is-here" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/primary-day-sept-400.jpg" alt="primary day sept 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7929-max-murphy-podcast-2018-primary-day-is-here" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Primary Day Is Here</a> — September 12, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7913-max-murphy-podcast-final-days-of-the-lieutenant-governor-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/podcast-hocul-williams-400.jpg" alt="Final Days of the Lieutenant Governor Primary between Kathy Hochul &amp; Jumaane Williams" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7913-max-murphy-podcast-final-days-of-the-lieutenant-governor-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Final Days of the Lieutenant Governor Primary between Kathy Hochul &amp; Jumaane Williams</a> — September 5, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7897-max-murphy-podcast-an-intense-queens-senate-primary-with-jessica-ramos-and-senator-jose-peralta" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/podcast-ramos-perlata-400.jpg" alt="Intense Queens Senate Primary Centers on Delivering for Immigrant Communities, with Jessica Ramos &amp; State Senator Jose Peralta" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7897-max-murphy-podcast-an-intense-queens-senate-primary-with-jessica-ramos-and-senator-jose-peralta" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Intense Queens Senate Primary Centers on Delivering for Immigrant Communities, with Jessica Ramos &amp; State Senator Jose Peralta</a> — August 30, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7881-max-murphy-podcast-race-politics-in-ten-years-since-obama-s-nomination" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/christine-greer-400.jpg" alt="christine greer 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7881-max-murphy-podcast-race-politics-in-ten-years-since-obama-s-nomination" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Race &amp; Politics in Ten Years Since Obama's NominationRace &amp; Politics in Ten Years Since Obama's Nomination</a> — August 22, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7880-max-murphy-podcast-preparing-for-primary-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mara-gay-400.jpg" alt="mara gay 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7880-max-murphy-podcast-preparing-for-primary-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Preparing for Primary DayMax &amp; Murphy Podcast: Preparing for Primary Day</a> — August 22, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7869-max-murphy-podcast-central-brooklyn-senate-primary-tests-idc-awareness" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/myrie-hamilton-400.jpg" alt="myrie hamilton 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7869-max-murphy-podcast-central-brooklyn-senate-primary-tests-idc-awareness" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Central Brooklyn Senate Primary Tests IDC Awareness (with Zellnor Myrie and Senator Jesse Hamilton)</a> — August 15, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7850-max-murphy-podcast-queens-state-senate-rematch-features-different-kinds-of-democrat" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/tony-avella-john-liu-wbai-400.jpg" alt="Queens State Senate Rematch Features Different Kinds of Democrats (with Senator Tony Avella and challenger John Liu)" width="400" height="206" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7850-max-murphy-podcast-queens-state-senate-rematch-features-different-kinds-of-democrat" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Queens State Senate Rematch Features Different Kinds of Democrats (with Senator Tony Avella and challenger John Liu)</a> — August 8, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7849-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-sean-patrick-maloney" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/sean-patrick-maloney-wbai-podcast-400.jpg" alt="Attorney General Candidate Sean Patrick Maloney" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7849-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-sean-patrick-maloney" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Attorney General Candidate Sean Patrick Maloney</a> — August 8, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7836-max-murphy-podcast-manhattan-state-senate-rematch-centered-on-breakaway-democrats" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/marisol-alcantara-robert-jackson-state-400.jpg" alt="marisol alcantara robert jackson state 400" width="400" height="201" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7836-max-murphy-podcast-manhattan-state-senate-rematch-centered-on-breakaway-democrats" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Manhattan State Senate Rematch Centered on Breakaway Democrats</a>&nbsp;— August 1, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7824-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-leecia-eve" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/leecia-eve-400px.jpg" alt="leecia eve 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7824-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-leecia-eve" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Attorney General Candidate Leecia Eve</a>&nbsp;— July 25, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7812-max-murphy-podcast-letitia-james-the-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/tish-james-400px.jpg" alt="tish james 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7812-max-murphy-podcast-letitia-james-the-attorney-general-primary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Letitia James &amp; the Attorney General Primary</a>&nbsp;— July 18, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7791-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-zephyr-teachout" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/zephyr-teachout-400.jpg" alt="zephyr teachout 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7791-max-murphy-podcast-attorney-general-candidate-zephyr-teachout" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Attorney General Candidate Zephyr Teachout</a>&nbsp;— July 9, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7767-max-murphy-podcast-the-long-fight-for-new-city-sexual-harassment-laws" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/rosenthal-holtzman-pod-400.jpg" alt="rosenthal holtzman pod 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7767-max-murphy-podcast-the-long-fight-for-new-city-sexual-harassment-laws" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Long Fight for New City Sexual Harassment Laws</a>&nbsp;— June 25, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7751-max-murphy-podcast-a-new-era-at-the-mta" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/gelinas-477.jpg" alt="gelinas 477" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7751-max-murphy-podcast-a-new-era-at-the-mta" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A New Era at The MTA? with Nicole Gelinas</a>&nbsp;— June 21, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7737-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-kathy-hochul" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/kathy-hochul-400.jpg" alt="Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7737-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-kathy-hochul" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul</a>&nbsp;— June 14, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7712-max-murphy-podcast-criminal-justice-reform-in-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/fortune-society-reps-for-400.jpg" alt="fortune society reps for 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7712-max-murphy-podcast-criminal-justice-reform-in-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Criminal Justice Reform in New York</a>&nbsp;— June 5, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7707-max-murphy-podcast-senate-democratic-leader-andrea-stewart-cousins" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2016/andrea-s-c-pod-400px.jpg" alt="Senate Democratic Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7707-max-murphy-podcast-senate-democratic-leader-andrea-stewart-cousins" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Senate Democratic Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins</a>&nbsp;— June 1, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7692-max-murphy-podcast-state-party-conventions-nominations" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo-400px.jpg" alt="mxm logo 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7692-max-murphy-podcast-state-party-conventions-nominations" target="_blank" rel="noopener">State Party Conventions &amp; Nominations</a>&nbsp;— May 25, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7673-max-murphy-podcast-stephanie-miner-syracuse-mayor-cuomo" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/pod-steph-miner-400-163.jpg" alt="pod steph miner 400 163" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7673-max-murphy-podcast-stephanie-miner-syracuse-mayor-cuomo" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Stephanie Miner</a>&nbsp;— May 15, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7659-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-joe-borelli" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/joe-borelli-podcast-map-400.jpg" alt="joe borelli podcast map 400" width="400" height="315" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7659-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-joe-borelli" target="_blank" rel="noopener">City Council Member Joe Borelli</a>&nbsp;— May 7, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/eric-adams-m-m-pod-400px.jpg" alt="eric adams m m pod 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7648-max-murphy-podcast-brooklyn-borough-president-eric-adams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams</a>&nbsp;— May 1, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7632-max-murphy-podcast-political-purity-tests-in-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/m-m-stanley-fritz-citizen-action-400px.jpg" alt="Stanley fritz citizen action 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7632-max-murphy-podcast-political-purity-tests-in-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Political Purity Tests in New York</a>&nbsp;— April 25, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7617-max-murphy-podcast-reforming-special-elections-more-in-albany" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/susan-lerner-cc-ny-400px.jpg" alt="susan lerner cc ny 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7617-max-murphy-podcast-reforming-special-elections-more-in-albany" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reforming Special Elections &amp; More in Albany</a>&nbsp;— April 17, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7597-max-murphy-suing-nycha" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/suing-nycha-400.jpg" alt="suing nycha 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7597-max-murphy-suing-nycha" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Suing NYCHA</a>&nbsp;— April 10, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7583-max-murphy-podcast-molinaro-launches-campaign-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/marc-molinaro400px.jpg" alt="Marc Molinaro Launches Campaign for Governor" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7583-max-murphy-podcast-molinaro-launches-campaign-for-governor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Molinaro Launches Campaign for Governor</a>&nbsp;— April 2, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7568-max-murphy-podcast-chirlane-mccray" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/ch-mccray-400px.jpg" alt="Chirlane McCray" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7568-max-murphy-podcast-chirlane-mccray" target="_blank" rel="noopener">First Lady Chirlane McCray</a>&nbsp;— March 26, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7548-max-murphy-podcast-michelle-de-la-uz" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/michelle-de-la-uz-400.jpg" alt="michelle de la uz 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7548-max-murphy-podcast-michelle-de-la-uz" target="_blank" rel="noopener">City Planning Commissioner Michelle de la Uz</a>&nbsp;— March 19, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7536-max-murphy-podcast-a-journalist-runs-for-state-senate" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/ross-barkan-senate400.jpg" alt="ross barkan senate" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7536-max-murphy-podcast-a-journalist-runs-for-state-senate" target="_blank">A Journalist Runs for State Senate</a>&nbsp;— March 13, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7517-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-s-progress-fighting-homelessness" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/bdb-homelessness-400.jpg" alt="De Blasio's Progress Fighting Homelessness" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7517-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-s-progress-fighting-homelessness" target="_blank" rel="noopener">De Blasio's Progress Fighting Homelessness</a>&nbsp;— March 5, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7494-max-murphy-podcast-idc-challengers-robert-jackson-jessica-ramos" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/ramos-jackson-podcast.jpg" alt="ramos jackson podcast" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/state/7494-max-murphy-podcast-idc-challengers-robert-jackson-jessica-ramos" target="_blank" rel="noopener">IDC Challengers Robert Jackson &amp; Jessica Ramos</a>&nbsp;— February 26, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7490-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-candidate-jumaane-williams" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/jumanne-williams-pod-400.jpg" alt="Jumaane Williams" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7490-max-murphy-podcast-lieutenant-governor-candidate-jumaane-williams" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Lieutenant Governor Candidate Jumaane Williams</a>&nbsp;— February 23, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7478-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-de-blasio-s-state-of-the-city-address" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/feb14-podcast.jpg" alt="feb14 podcast" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7478-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-de-blasio-s-state-of-the-city-address" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Analyzing De Blasio's State of the City Address</a>&nbsp;— February 14, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7462-max-murphy-podcast-deconstructing-de-blasio-s-visit-to-albany" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/3kall-pod-400.jpg" alt="Deconstructing De Blasio's Visit to Albany" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7462-max-murphy-podcast-deconstructing-de-blasio-s-visit-to-albany" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Deconstructing De Blasio's Visit to Albany</a>&nbsp;— January 30, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7448-max-murphy-podcast-education-in-de-blasio-s-second-term" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/bdb-mayor-hearing-400px.jpg" alt="bdb mayor hearing 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7448-max-murphy-podcast-education-in-de-blasio-s-second-term" target="_blank" rel="noopener">De Blasio's 2nd Term Focus on Education</a>&nbsp;— January 30, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7433-max-murphy-podcast-congestion-pricing-with-alex-matthiessen-of-move-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/alex-matthiessen-move-ny-400.jpg" alt="alex matthiessen move ny 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7433-max-murphy-podcast-congestion-pricing-with-alex-matthiessen-of-move-new-york" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Congestion Pricing with Alex Matthiessen of Move New York</a>&nbsp;— January 22, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7426-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-ritchie-torres-on-the-new-council-his-new-role" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/ritchie-torres-400px.jpg" alt="ritchie torres 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7426-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-ritchie-torres-on-the-new-council-his-new-role" target="_blank" rel="noopener">City Council Member Ritchie Torres on The New Council &amp; His New Role</a>&nbsp;— January 17, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7413-max-murphy-podcast-new-city-council-members-justin-brannan-carlina-rivera" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/rivera-brannan-400x167.jpg" alt="rivera brannan 400x167" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7413-max-murphy-podcast-new-city-council-members-justin-brannan-carlina-rivera" target="_blank" rel="noopener">New City Council Members Justin Brannan &amp; Carlina Rivera</a>&nbsp;— January 10, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7400-max-murphy-big-political-news-to-start-2018" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/bdb400px.jpg" alt="bdb400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7400-max-murphy-big-political-news-to-start-2018" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Big Political News to Start 2018</a>&nbsp;— January 3, 2018</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7383-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-speaker-melissa-mark-viverito" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/melissa-mark-viverito-alatriste-podium400.jpg" alt="melissa mark viverito alatriste podium400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7383-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-speaker-melissa-mark-viverito" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito</a>&nbsp;— December 15, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7363-max-murphy-podcast-eric-koch-former-city-council-communications-director" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/eric-koch-400.jpg" alt="eric koch 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7363-max-murphy-podcast-eric-koch-former-city-council-communications-director" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Eric Koch, former City Council communications director</a>&nbsp;— December 15, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7355-max-murphy-podcast-nycha-ceo-shola-olatoye" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/shola-olayote-400.jpg" alt="Shola Olayote" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7355-max-murphy-podcast-nycha-ceo-shola-olatoye" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">NYCHA CEO Shola Olatoye</a>&nbsp;— December 7, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7348-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-elizabeth-crowley" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/liz-crowley-podcast-400.jpg" alt="liz crowley podcast 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7348-max-murphy-podcast-city-council-member-elizabeth-crowley" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">City Council Member Elizabeth Crowley</a>&nbsp;— December 5, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7337-max-murphy-podcast-previewing-de-blasio-s-second-term" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/bill_de_blasio_2nd_term_400px.jpg" alt="bill de blasio 2nd term 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7337-max-murphy-podcast-previewing-de-blasio-s-second-term" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Previewing de Blasio's 2nd term</a>&nbsp;— November 27, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7308-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-election-results" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/bdb-voting-sign-in-400.jpg" alt="bdb voting sign in 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7308-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-election-results" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Analyzing the 2017 Election Results</a>&nbsp;— November 9, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7301-max-murphy-podcast-10-things-to-think-about-on-election-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/mayor-bdb-400.jpg" alt="mayor bdb 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7301-max-murphy-podcast-10-things-to-think-about-on-election-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">10 Things to Think About on Election Day</a>&nbsp;— November 7, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7292-max-murphy-podcast-resetting-the-mayoral-race-after-the-final-debate" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/mayoral-candidates-400.jpg" alt="mayoral candidates 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7292-max-murphy-podcast-resetting-the-mayoral-race-after-the-final-debate" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Resetting the Mayoral Race after the Final Debate</a>&nbsp;— November 3, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7269-max-murphy-podcast-akeem-browder-aaron-commey-mike-tolkin-are-running-for-mayor" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/3-mayors-stream.jpg" alt="3 mayors stream" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7269-max-murphy-podcast-akeem-browder-aaron-commey-mike-tolkin-are-running-for-mayor" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Akeem Browder, Aaron Commey &amp; Mike Tolkin are Running for Mayor</a>&nbsp;— October 23, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7259-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-the-public-advocate-comptroller-debates" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/brigid-at-debate-nyc-votesstream.jpg" alt="brigid at debate nyc votesstream" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7259-max-murphy-podcast-analyzing-the-public-advocate-comptroller-debates" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Analyzing the Public Advocate &amp; Comptroller Debates</a>&nbsp;— October 19, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7243-max-murphy-analyzing-the-first-general-election-mayoral-debate" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/debate-stage400.jpg" alt="debate stage400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7243-max-murphy-analyzing-the-first-general-election-mayoral-debate" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Analyzing the First General Election Mayoral Debate</a>&nbsp;— October 11, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7229-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-letitia-james" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/tish-james400.jpg" alt="tish james400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7229-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-letitia-james" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Public Advocate Letitia James</a>&nbsp;— October 2, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7219-max-murphy-podcast-comptroller-candidate-michel-faulkner" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/michel-faulkner400.jpg" alt="Michel faulkner" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7219-max-murphy-podcast-comptroller-candidate-michel-faulkner" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Comptroller candidate Michel Faulkner</a>&nbsp;— September 29, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7201-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-jc-polanco" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/jcpolanco-400.jpg" alt="jcpolanco 400" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7201-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-jc-polanco" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Public Advocate Candidate JC Polanco</a>&nbsp;— September 18, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7186-max-murphy-podcast-a-candidates-final-hours-of-a-campaign" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/gifford-miller-city-council-400px.jpg" alt="gifford miller city council 400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7186-max-murphy-podcast-a-candidates-final-hours-of-a-campaign" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Gifford Miller, former Speaker of the City Council and mayoral candidate</a>&nbsp;— September 11, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7173-max-murphy-podcast-previewing-primary-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/brigid-bergin-and-ben-max400px.jpg" alt="brigid bergin and ben max400px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7173-max-murphy-podcast-previewing-primary-day" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Brigid Bergin of WNYC radio</a>&nbsp;— September 5, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7164-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-author-joseph-viteritti" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/cover-vitteri-stream2.jpg" alt="Joseph Viteritti" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7164-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-author-joseph-viteritti" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">De Blasio Author Joseph Viteritti</a>&nbsp;— August 30, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7158-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-david-eisenbach" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/public-adv-candidate-david-eisenbach400px.jpg" alt="Public advocate Candidate David Eisenbach" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7158-max-murphy-podcast-public-advocate-candidate-david-eisenbach" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Public advocate Candidate David Eisenbach</a>&nbsp;— August 28, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7135-max-murphy-podcast-azi-paybarah" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/azi-paybarah-tv-400px167px.jpg" alt="azi paybarah tv 400px167px" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7135-max-murphy-podcast-azi-paybarah" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Azi Paybarah</a>&nbsp;— August 17, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7129-max-murphy-podcast-christina-greer-and-alexis-grenell" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/grenell-max-greer-400-167.png" alt="Dr. Christina Greer and Alexis Grenell" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7129-max-murphy-podcast-christina-greer-and-alexis-grenell" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Representative vs. Substantive Representation, with Dr. Christina Greer and Alexis Grenell</a>&nbsp;— August 15, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7098-max-murphy-podcast-the-mayoral-race-with-top-political-strategists" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"> <img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/max-murphy-katz-fullington-res.jpg" alt="max murphy katz fullington res" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7098-max-murphy-podcast-the-mayoral-race-with-top-political-strategists" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">The Mayoral Race with Top Political Strategists</a>&nbsp;— July 31, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <!-- Breaks --> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7080-max-murphy-podcast-mayoral-candidate-bo-dietl" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"> <img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/bo-dietl.jpg" alt="bo dietl" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7080-max-murphy-podcast-mayoral-candidate-bo-dietl" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Mayoral Candidate Bo Dietl</a>&nbsp;— July 24, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <!-- Breaks --> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7064-max-murphy-podcast-republican-mayoral-candidate-nicole-malliotakis" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/nicole-malliotakis.jpg" alt="nicole malliotakis" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7064-max-murphy-podcast-republican-mayoral-candidate-nicole-malliotakis" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Republican Mayoral Candidate Nicole Malliotaki</a>&nbsp;— July 13, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7033-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-press-secretary-eric-phillips" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/eric-phillips.jpg" alt="eric phillips" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7033-max-murphy-podcast-de-blasio-press-secretary-eric-phillips" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Eric Phillips, press secretary to Mayor Bill de Blasio</a>&nbsp;— July 5, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7030-max-murphy-podcast-democratic-mayoral-candidate-sal-albanese" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/sal-albanese.jpg" alt="sal albanese" width="400" height="167" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7030-max-murphy-podcast-democratic-mayoral-candidate-sal-albanese" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Democratic Mayoral Candidate Sal Albanese</a> — June 26, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7009-max-murphy-podcast-republican-mayoral-candidate-paul-massey" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/paul-massey.jpg" alt="paul massey" width="400" height="167" /></a>&nbsp;</td> <td> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7009-max-murphy-podcast-republican-mayoral-candidate-paul-massey">Republican Mayoral Candidate Paul Massey</a>&nbsp;— June 19, 2017 (note: Paul Massey dropped out of the mayoral race on June 28, though the episode is still worth listening to)</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6989-max-murphy-podcast-mayoral-candidate-bob-gangi" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/podcast/bob-gangi.jpg" alt="bob gangi" width="400" height="167" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" /></a></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6989-max-murphy-podcast-mayoral-candidate-bob-gangi">Democratic Mayoral Candidate Bob Gangi</a> — June 12, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 400px;"><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/mxm-logo-400px.jpg" alt="mxm logo 400px" width="400" height="167" /></td> <td><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6997-max-murphy-on-politics-election-season-is-here">Election Season is Here!</a> — June 1, 2017</td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><br />A variety of earlier episodes of the Max &amp; Murphy Podcast, <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/6183-max-a-murphy-on-housing">through the&nbsp;archive</a>, often focused on New York housing policy and politics — <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/6183-max-a-murphy-on-housing">see all episodes from the start February 12, 2016 to May 25, 2017</a></p>