Gotham Gazette Gotham Gazette is an online publication covering New York policy and politics as well as news on public safety, transportation, education, finance and more. http://www.gothamgazette.com/component/tags/tag/israel 2017-12-12T21:55:02+00:00 Webmaster webmaster@gothamgazette.com The Mayor's Media Blitz 2015-10-16T02:35:56+00:00 2015-10-16T02:35:56+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=5935:the-mayors-media-blitz-de-blasio Super User <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/22103478852_c70cdbdc87_z.jpg" alt="de blasio media parade col day" width="600" height="399" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">The mayor &amp; the media (<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/nycmayorsoffice/22103478852/in/dateposted/" target="_blank">photo</a>:&nbsp;Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office)</span></p> <hr /> <p>Have you heard Mayor de Blasio's voice lately? He's been trying harder to ensure you have, sharply increasing the frequency with which he makes extended appearances on television and radio, and holding events to interact directly with New Yorkers.</p> <p>Instead of New Yorkers only hearing and seeing quick clips of the mayor on networks covering his press conferences, de Blasio has pursued greater control over his message, making many more broadcast appearances. The push is indicative of a mayor seeking to correct a public perception problem, lift slumping <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/de-blasio-worst-marks-latest-poll-article-1.2316196" target="_blank">poll numbers</a>, reconnect with his base, and woo more allies.</p> <p>In September, for example, the mayor averaged about one TV or radio interview per day. In July and August, the mayor averaged just one TV or radio interview per week. Going back to June, it was about two per week - more frequent than during the typically slower summer months that included a family vacation, but less often than recently.</p> <p>The uptick <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5865-on-twitter-de-blasio-continues-efforts-at-direct-public-contact" target="_blank">began in late August</a> after worrisome public opinion polls and de Blasio criticizing media coverage of his administration. The trend then took hold in September as the mayor seized on Pope Francis' visit to New York and the start of a new school year.</p> <p>The effort to be on the airwaves more is "clearly part of a concerted effort," says Democratic political strategist Alexis Grenell. "It allows him to connect with the electorate, which is good for him and good for the public. Arguably, he should be doing more."</p> <p>Not coincidentally, the mayor's media blitz has also coincided with an increase in planned in-person interactions with the public: de Blasio did pre-K canvassing, spoke about his housing plans at a church, and held a parents' night at a school, all in Brooklyn; he hosted <a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/city-hall/2015/10/8579742/de-blasio-answers-publics-housing-questions-finally-person" target="_blank">his first</a> town hall meeting, also focused on housing, on Wednesday evening in Washington Heights.</p> <p>"It's about time," said Dr. Christina Greer, a Fordham political science professor. Greer thinks that although a bit late into his term, it was smart for de Blasio to do the initial town hall and that it is key for him to be on the airwaves more. "He needs to control the narrative, and you need to give yourself the opportunities to do so. If you don't leave City Hall, the media can craft the narrative more. If you get on the airwaves, you can deliver the message...if you go to the people, they hear it directly from you," Greer says.</p> <p>With information provided by the mayor's office and gleaned from press advisories, Gotham Gazette counted 13 appearances by de Blasio on radio and TV over 79 days from June 1 through August 18. In the following 55 days, de Blasio made 36 such appearances, beginning with <a href="http://www.wnyc.org/story/mayor-de-blasio-talks-about-pre-k-year-2/" target="_blank">a 40-minute interview</a> on WNYC's The Brian Lehrer Show on August 19.</p> <p>Asked about the sizeable increase in broadcast interviews, Karen Hinton, the mayor's press secretary, emailed Gotham Gazette to say, "Whether it's walking through a neighborhood - something the Mayor often does spontaneously - or taking questions from the public during a radio show or a Town Hall, Mayor de Blasio is always looking for new ways to communicate with New Yorkers so he can learn more about their problems and find solutions."</p> <p>Even frequent de Blasio critics see progress. Republican political strategist Jessica Proud told Gotham Gazette that she sees a different, and welcome, approach by the mayor and that she suspects Hinton has been a key force behind it. Proud, who helped run the campaign of de Blasio's general election opponent, Joe Lhota, said the mayor still has a long way to go, but it is positive for all involved if he is on the airwaves more and doing town halls.</p> <p>"I see a little bit of progress, yes, but he will need a more aggressive pace if he wants to dispel that rap on him," Proud said of the impression that the mayor has been in his own progressive bubble. She said that the mayor and his team have been too siloed, and even as they branch out, they must continue to do more appearances in places like Staten Island, and that the mayor should appear on a broader diversity of radio and TV programs.</p> <p>"Going on The Brian Lehrer Show, that's right in line with his base and his audience," Proud said, referring to the popular political talk show that appears to be de Blasio's favorite on-air venue. "The media and the public would relish the chance to have more in-depth conversations with him" on a wide variety of topics, she said.</p> <p>Evan Siegfried, also a Republican strategist, says that more on-air hits are a good thing for any politician, but that de Blasio needs more accomplishments to boast, which comes down to his policies.</p> <p>Polls show that the mayor must improve voters' perception of him and the direction of the city under his leadership. It's not clear whether New Yorkers are worried about de Blasio's openness to ideas that don't fit his typical focus on inequality and progressivism as he defines it. Proud argued, though, that "there are a lot of city opinion leaders, civic leaders that do matter - their perception of you has a ripple effect."</p> <p>Grenell, Greer, and Proud all agree that more public exposure is smart for de Blasio in particular because he's actually good at delivering his message. "Some people aren't their own best messengers and need other people to articulate their vision," Greer says, "but [de Blasio] is not that person, he's actually the best person to explain his ideas, he's very good at it."</p> <p>Grenell thinks similarly: "When you listen to the mayor on the radio, he excels, it is only good for him."</p> <p>In short, being on the airwaves more, holding more public events to interact with New Yorkers is both good government and good politics.</p> <p>Still, within de Blasio's media hits lies an ongoing problem for the mayor: his presence on the national stage and the perception that he is not as focused on city governance as he should be.</p> <p>A handful of the mayor's recent TV appearances have been on national programs, like ABC's This Week with George Stephanopoulos, but that has been a trend for the mayor. The real increase in de Blasio's media presence has been on local radio, with more appearances on WNYC as well as 1010 Wins, Hot 97, and AM 970 The Answer.</p> <p>While he has mostly feuded with The New York Post, de Blasio has been <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/17/nyregion/bump-after-bump-bill-de-blasio-is-still-hitting-political-potholes.html?ref=todayspaper&amp;_r=0" target="_blank">critical of the media</a> in general, though less so since August, when he expressed concerns with press focus on topics he finds less appropriate than policy points of his agenda.</p> <p>One way to get around displeasing newspaper coverage is to do fewer press conferences and make more interview appearances over the airwaves. Even if somewhat filtered by the radio or TV host, live appearances offer direct channels to those who tune in.</p> <p>"I'm baffled by why he and his handlers haven't done this more," Dr. Greer said, "because when he talks to the voters, he resonates. When he talks about New York City he makes you feel like no one wants to fight for New York City more than him."</p> <p>Greer asserts that de Blasio's favorability will rise "if he does a sustained effort at TV and radio." Similar to Proud, Siegfried said "de Blasio should also be willing to sit down with adversarial media outlets for interviews. It would demonstrate he is not afraid to talk to people that might not laud him with praise."</p> <p>Greer also said de Blasio should appear on a wide variety of outlets, though she didn't necessarily say they should be "adversarial."</p> <p>"Hearing him on a station that's not say, NPR, it gives him access to people are who are not necessarily paying attention to the political scene throughout," Greer said, citing what she called a strong appearance on Hot 97.</p> <p>It's a novel approach aimed at correcting course as de Blasio nears the halfway point of his term: more broadcast interviews, town hall-style events, and even <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/17/nyregion/de-blasios-attitude-on-bloomberg-shifts.html?smid=tw-nytmetro&amp;smtyp=cur&amp;_r=0" target="_blank">attempting</a> to mend fences with his predecessor, former Mayor Michael Bloomberg.</p> <p>While the mayor is not shying away from his progressive brand of politics and battle with inequality, he and his team are perhaps recognizing a need to change the narrative and do some things differently in order to capture more good will and public approval.</p> <p>To date, October hasn't shown the pace of radio and TV appearances de Blasio struck last month, when he was not only tying his agenda to the Pope's visit and promoting his pre-kindergarten program, but also addressing the NYPD's mishandling of former tennis star James Blake and sparring with Governor Cuomo over MTA funding.</p> <p>When de Blasio returns from a weekend trip to Israel, he'll give indication of whether he intends to resume the more frequent pace of media appearances some say is essential to his potential success.</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank">@TweetBenMax</a></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/22103478852_c70cdbdc87_z.jpg" alt="de blasio media parade col day" width="600" height="399" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">The mayor &amp; the media (<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/nycmayorsoffice/22103478852/in/dateposted/" target="_blank">photo</a>:&nbsp;Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office)</span></p> <hr /> <p>Have you heard Mayor de Blasio's voice lately? He's been trying harder to ensure you have, sharply increasing the frequency with which he makes extended appearances on television and radio, and holding events to interact directly with New Yorkers.</p> <p>Instead of New Yorkers only hearing and seeing quick clips of the mayor on networks covering his press conferences, de Blasio has pursued greater control over his message, making many more broadcast appearances. The push is indicative of a mayor seeking to correct a public perception problem, lift slumping <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/de-blasio-worst-marks-latest-poll-article-1.2316196" target="_blank">poll numbers</a>, reconnect with his base, and woo more allies.</p> <p>In September, for example, the mayor averaged about one TV or radio interview per day. In July and August, the mayor averaged just one TV or radio interview per week. Going back to June, it was about two per week - more frequent than during the typically slower summer months that included a family vacation, but less often than recently.</p> <p>The uptick <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5865-on-twitter-de-blasio-continues-efforts-at-direct-public-contact" target="_blank">began in late August</a> after worrisome public opinion polls and de Blasio criticizing media coverage of his administration. The trend then took hold in September as the mayor seized on Pope Francis' visit to New York and the start of a new school year.</p> <p>The effort to be on the airwaves more is "clearly part of a concerted effort," says Democratic political strategist Alexis Grenell. "It allows him to connect with the electorate, which is good for him and good for the public. Arguably, he should be doing more."</p> <p>Not coincidentally, the mayor's media blitz has also coincided with an increase in planned in-person interactions with the public: de Blasio did pre-K canvassing, spoke about his housing plans at a church, and held a parents' night at a school, all in Brooklyn; he hosted <a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/city-hall/2015/10/8579742/de-blasio-answers-publics-housing-questions-finally-person" target="_blank">his first</a> town hall meeting, also focused on housing, on Wednesday evening in Washington Heights.</p> <p>"It's about time," said Dr. Christina Greer, a Fordham political science professor. Greer thinks that although a bit late into his term, it was smart for de Blasio to do the initial town hall and that it is key for him to be on the airwaves more. "He needs to control the narrative, and you need to give yourself the opportunities to do so. If you don't leave City Hall, the media can craft the narrative more. If you get on the airwaves, you can deliver the message...if you go to the people, they hear it directly from you," Greer says.</p> <p>With information provided by the mayor's office and gleaned from press advisories, Gotham Gazette counted 13 appearances by de Blasio on radio and TV over 79 days from June 1 through August 18. In the following 55 days, de Blasio made 36 such appearances, beginning with <a href="http://www.wnyc.org/story/mayor-de-blasio-talks-about-pre-k-year-2/" target="_blank">a 40-minute interview</a> on WNYC's The Brian Lehrer Show on August 19.</p> <p>Asked about the sizeable increase in broadcast interviews, Karen Hinton, the mayor's press secretary, emailed Gotham Gazette to say, "Whether it's walking through a neighborhood - something the Mayor often does spontaneously - or taking questions from the public during a radio show or a Town Hall, Mayor de Blasio is always looking for new ways to communicate with New Yorkers so he can learn more about their problems and find solutions."</p> <p>Even frequent de Blasio critics see progress. Republican political strategist Jessica Proud told Gotham Gazette that she sees a different, and welcome, approach by the mayor and that she suspects Hinton has been a key force behind it. Proud, who helped run the campaign of de Blasio's general election opponent, Joe Lhota, said the mayor still has a long way to go, but it is positive for all involved if he is on the airwaves more and doing town halls.</p> <p>"I see a little bit of progress, yes, but he will need a more aggressive pace if he wants to dispel that rap on him," Proud said of the impression that the mayor has been in his own progressive bubble. She said that the mayor and his team have been too siloed, and even as they branch out, they must continue to do more appearances in places like Staten Island, and that the mayor should appear on a broader diversity of radio and TV programs.</p> <p>"Going on The Brian Lehrer Show, that's right in line with his base and his audience," Proud said, referring to the popular political talk show that appears to be de Blasio's favorite on-air venue. "The media and the public would relish the chance to have more in-depth conversations with him" on a wide variety of topics, she said.</p> <p>Evan Siegfried, also a Republican strategist, says that more on-air hits are a good thing for any politician, but that de Blasio needs more accomplishments to boast, which comes down to his policies.</p> <p>Polls show that the mayor must improve voters' perception of him and the direction of the city under his leadership. It's not clear whether New Yorkers are worried about de Blasio's openness to ideas that don't fit his typical focus on inequality and progressivism as he defines it. Proud argued, though, that "there are a lot of city opinion leaders, civic leaders that do matter - their perception of you has a ripple effect."</p> <p>Grenell, Greer, and Proud all agree that more public exposure is smart for de Blasio in particular because he's actually good at delivering his message. "Some people aren't their own best messengers and need other people to articulate their vision," Greer says, "but [de Blasio] is not that person, he's actually the best person to explain his ideas, he's very good at it."</p> <p>Grenell thinks similarly: "When you listen to the mayor on the radio, he excels, it is only good for him."</p> <p>In short, being on the airwaves more, holding more public events to interact with New Yorkers is both good government and good politics.</p> <p>Still, within de Blasio's media hits lies an ongoing problem for the mayor: his presence on the national stage and the perception that he is not as focused on city governance as he should be.</p> <p>A handful of the mayor's recent TV appearances have been on national programs, like ABC's This Week with George Stephanopoulos, but that has been a trend for the mayor. The real increase in de Blasio's media presence has been on local radio, with more appearances on WNYC as well as 1010 Wins, Hot 97, and AM 970 The Answer.</p> <p>While he has mostly feuded with The New York Post, de Blasio has been <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/17/nyregion/bump-after-bump-bill-de-blasio-is-still-hitting-political-potholes.html?ref=todayspaper&amp;_r=0" target="_blank">critical of the media</a> in general, though less so since August, when he expressed concerns with press focus on topics he finds less appropriate than policy points of his agenda.</p> <p>One way to get around displeasing newspaper coverage is to do fewer press conferences and make more interview appearances over the airwaves. Even if somewhat filtered by the radio or TV host, live appearances offer direct channels to those who tune in.</p> <p>"I'm baffled by why he and his handlers haven't done this more," Dr. Greer said, "because when he talks to the voters, he resonates. When he talks about New York City he makes you feel like no one wants to fight for New York City more than him."</p> <p>Greer asserts that de Blasio's favorability will rise "if he does a sustained effort at TV and radio." Similar to Proud, Siegfried said "de Blasio should also be willing to sit down with adversarial media outlets for interviews. It would demonstrate he is not afraid to talk to people that might not laud him with praise."</p> <p>Greer also said de Blasio should appear on a wide variety of outlets, though she didn't necessarily say they should be "adversarial."</p> <p>"Hearing him on a station that's not say, NPR, it gives him access to people are who are not necessarily paying attention to the political scene throughout," Greer said, citing what she called a strong appearance on Hot 97.</p> <p>It's a novel approach aimed at correcting course as de Blasio nears the halfway point of his term: more broadcast interviews, town hall-style events, and even <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/17/nyregion/de-blasios-attitude-on-bloomberg-shifts.html?smid=tw-nytmetro&amp;smtyp=cur&amp;_r=0" target="_blank">attempting</a> to mend fences with his predecessor, former Mayor Michael Bloomberg.</p> <p>While the mayor is not shying away from his progressive brand of politics and battle with inequality, he and his team are perhaps recognizing a need to change the narrative and do some things differently in order to capture more good will and public approval.</p> <p>To date, October hasn't shown the pace of radio and TV appearances de Blasio struck last month, when he was not only tying his agenda to the Pope's visit and promoting his pre-kindergarten program, but also addressing the NYPD's mishandling of former tennis star James Blake and sparring with Governor Cuomo over MTA funding.</p> <p>When de Blasio returns from a weekend trip to Israel, he'll give indication of whether he intends to resume the more frequent pace of media appearances some say is essential to his potential success.</p> <p>***<br />by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank">@TweetBenMax</a></p> The Week That Was in New York Politics, October 12-16 2015-10-16T15:31:18+00:00 2015-10-16T15:31:18+00:00 http://www.gothamgazette.com/?id=5936:the-week-that-was-in-new-york-politics-october-12-16 Super User <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/week_in_review_bus_readers.jpg" alt="week in review bus readers" width="600" height="409" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://blog.mcny.org/2012/04/24/a-ride-on-the-subway-in-1946-with-stanley-kubrick/" target="_blank">photo</a>: Stanley Kubrick via Museum of the City of New York</span></p> <hr /> <p>Gotham Gazette's Week in Review, Friday October 16</p> <p><strong>PHOTO OF THE WEEK:&nbsp;</strong>Mayor de Blasio and former Mayor David Dinkins at the ceremony naming The David N. Dinkins Municipal Building, via The Mayor's Office; Hillary Clinton and Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito at a protest rally in Las Vegas before the Democratic presidential debate, <a href="https://twitter.com/PedroJulio/status/653735190309703680" target="_blank">via Pedro Julio Serrano</a></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/BdB_Dinkins_via_mayors_office.jpg" alt="BdB Dinkins via mayors office" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="400" height="266" /></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/HRC_MMV.jpg" alt="HRC MMV" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="400" height="400" /></p> <p><strong>TOP FIVE STORIES OF THE WEEK:</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>1. MTA Funding Deal:</strong> This past Saturday, after months of debate, city and state officials reached a <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/editorial-mta-capital-plan-finally-article-1.2393980" target="_blank">deal</a> over funding for the MTA’s capital plan. New York City will pay an additional $2.5 billion, while the state will contribute $8.3 billion to meet what was the outstanding need of the $26 billion plan to expand and repair the MTA system over the next five years. As part of the <a href="http://observer.com/2015/10/cuomo-and-de-blasio-bury-hatchet-in-mta-funding-fight/" target="_blank">deal</a>, the state cannot divert funds from the capital plan, as the state has repeatedly removed money from the MTA budget in the past. Questions remain, however, over how the state and the city plan to pay for their shares - Republican Senate Majority Leader John Flanagan has <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/exclusive-nys-eyes-ways-fund-8-3b-mta-article-1.2393330" target="_blank">said</a> his conference won’t support new taxes to pay for the commitment and questioned new borrowing. De Blasio’s team is expected to outline its plans as part of a reworked capital budget in 2016.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>2. De Blasio’s First Town Hall:</strong> Mayor de Blasio held the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/15/nyregion/mayor-de-blasio-at-rare-public-forum-presents-himself-as-a-protector-of-tenants.html?ref=nyregion&amp;_r=0" target="_blank">first town hall</a> of his mayoralty in Washington Heights on Wednesday evening. The mayor took questions from a crowd of about 250 during the two-hour town hall with a focus on rent security and tenant protection. The town hall seems to be <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5935-the-mayors-media-blitz-de-blasio" target="_blank">part of a shifting strategy</a> for public interaction that began in late August, when Mayor de Blasio began <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5935-the-mayors-media-blitz-de-blasio" target="_blank">making more appearances on TV and radio shows</a>, as well as more formal in-person outreach to New Yorkers.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>3. Cuomo Team Returns to Puerto Rico:</strong> A delegation of New York State officials led by Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul returned to <a href="http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Hochul-to-lead-team-on-Puerto-Rico-trip-6565430.php" target="_blank">Puerto Rico</a> this week in an attempt to help the territory deal with its debt and health care crises. The delegation <a href="http://www.nystateofpolitics.com/2015/10/cuomo-admin-sends-more-help-to-puerto-rico/" target="_blank">included</a> Health Commissioner Howard Zucker, Medicaid Director Jason Helgerson, and Assemblymembers Marco Crespo and Richard Gottfried. Cuomo led the first delegation to Puerto Rico about a month ago.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>4. De Blasio to Israel:</strong> The mayor&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/15/nyregion/mayor-de-blasio-on-israel-trip-plans-visit-with-palestinians.html" target="_blank">headed to Israel</a> late Thursday to deliver a keynote address at the annual Conference of Mayors, where he will speak on the <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/mayor-de-blasio-israel-international-conference-article-1.2390617">topic</a> “Anti-Semitism in the West: How Cities Must Lead.” During the three-day trip, Mayor de Blasio will meet with Palestinians at a bilingual school in Jerusalem, a break from his predecessors, who only met with Israelis while visiting Israel in the past - though mayor won’t be meeting with official representatives of the Palestinian government. Questions remain around the private funding of de Blasio’s trip.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>5. Cuomo’s Common Core Task Force:</strong> Governor Cuomo's "Common Core Task Force"&nbsp;<a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/albany/2015/10/8579078/cuomos-common-core-panel-set-meet-next-week" target="_blank">met</a> for the first time Friday. The panel, made up of 15 educators, lawmakers, and business leaders, could suggest overhauling the Common Core standards in New York. Governor Cuomo <a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/albany/2015/09/8578053/new-task-force-familiar-faces-cuomo-wants-common-core-total-reboot" target="_blank">announced</a> a ‘total reboot’ of Common Core was necessary after roughly 20 percent of state students opted not to take standardized tests aligned with the tougher standards. On a related note, earlier in the week, the State Assembly education committee held a meeting on the state's most struggling schools. After Friday's meeting the Common Core Task Force announced plans for at least a dozen public forums and that it had appointed its first "student ambassador." [From September 29 when the task force had just been announced:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5913-absent-from-cuomos-new-education-task-force-a-student" target="_blank">Absent from Cuomo's New Education Task Force: A Student</a>]</p> <p><strong>THIS WEEK'S NUMBERS:</strong></p> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>$1.67 million</strong> in unclaimed funds have been <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/exclusive-nyc-finds-1-67m-lost-cash-state-registry-article-1.2393467" target="_blank">returned</a> to the city after Public Advocate Letitia James led a push for the city to recover money from New York’s unclaimed funds registry, which found that the city had more than 2,000 accounts with unclaimed funds.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>$174,000</strong>is outgoing Bronx District Attorney Robert Johnson’s new judicial <a href="http://nypost.com/2015/10/10/outgoing-bronx-da-to-score-300k-in-judge-salary-pension/" target="_blank">salary</a>, which he intends to collect in addition to his pension, which is estimated could be as much as $142,000 per year, according to The New York Post.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>41 months</strong> in federal prison for former Rikers correction officer Austin Romain for accepting over $11,000 in <a href="http://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/news/2015/10/13/former-rikers-correction-officer-who-accepted-more-than--11k-in-bribes-gets-41-months-in-federal-prison.html" target="_blank">bribes</a> as part of a scheme to distribute marijuana to Rikers inmates.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>3 states, 8 people, and over $100,000</strong> in <a href="http://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/criminal-justice/2015/10/14/eight-face-charges-in-connection-with-alleged-illegal-gun-smuggling-operation.html" target="_blank">illegal weapons</a> were involved in a gun-running ring busted by Brooklyn District Attorney Ken Thompson. 112 guns were sold to an undercover police officer during the year-long investigation into the gun-smuggling ring.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>11-year&nbsp;</strong>difference between the <a href="http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Community-Health-Profiles-Show-Disparity-Between-New-York-City-Neighborhoods-332607172.html" target="_blank">life expectancy</a> of residents of Brooklyn’s impoverished Brownsville neighborhood and the residents of Manhattan’s more affluent financial district.</li> </ul> <p><strong>THE GLORY AND THE GOAT:</strong></p> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>It was a good week for</strong> former New York City Mayor David Dinkins, who this week had the Manhattan Municipal Building <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/municipal-building-renamed-mayor-david-dinkins-article-1.2383824" target="_blank">renamed</a> in his honor.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>It was a bad week for</strong> Wendell Walters, former assistant commissioner of the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development, who was sentenced to three years in prison on Wednesday for accepting $2.5 million in <a href="http://goo.gl/hacbvH" target="_blank">bribes</a>.</li> </ul> <p><strong>THE FLASH:</strong></p> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>Around this time 103 years ago</strong>, on October 14, 1912, then-presidential candidate Teddy Roosevelt was <a href="http://www.politico.com/story/2007/10/roosevelt-shot-in-milwaukee-on-oct-14-1912-006332" target="_blank">shot</a> in the chest by a Manhattan man while campaigning in Milwaukee. He went on with a scheduled speech despite his wound.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>Around this time three years ago</strong>, on October 16, 2012, the FBI arrested Mohammed Nafis for plotting to <a href="http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2012/10/17/man-arrested-in-plot-to-blow-up-federal-reserve-bank-in-new-york/" target="_blank">detonate</a> a 1,000 pound car bomb in front of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>Around this time last year</strong>, on October 14, 2014, Mayor de Blasio kicked off two Hurricane Sandy-related employment programs in Queens as a means to better connect residents with <a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/city-hall/2014/10/8554657/de-blasio-kicks-sandy-jobs-programs-rockaways" target="_blank">jobs</a> and training programs in the storm-ravaged Rockaways.</li> </ul> <p><strong>GOTHAM GAZETTE HIGHLIGHTS OF THE WEEK:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5935-the-mayors-media-blitz-de-blasio" target="_blank">The Mayor's Media Blitz</a>, by Ben Max</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5934-reform-proposals-fly-as-panel-evaluates-ethics-watchdog" target="_blank">Reform Proposals Fly as Panel Evaluates Ethics Watchdog</a>, by Samar Khurshid</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5933-measuring-the-mayors-education-agenda" target="_blank">Measuring the Mayor’s Education Agenda</a>, by Kaela Sanborn-Hum</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/opinion/5932-albany-transparency-and-the-mta-funding-deal-show-us-our-money" target="_blank">Albany Transparency and the MTA Funding Deal: Show Us Our Money</a>, by John Kaehny (opinion)</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong><span face="Times New Roman">MORE FOR THE WEEKEND:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li dir="ltr">Gotham Gazette's David King <a href="http://www.twcnews.com/nys/capital-region/capital-tonight-interviews/2015/10/9/reporter-roundtable-100915.html" target="_blank">appeared on last Capital Tonight's reporters roundtable</a>&nbsp;to discuss the latest in New York state politics [video].</li> <li dir="ltr">Politico New York's Azi Paybarah <a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/city-hall/2015/10/8579843/quinns-next-chapter-working-homeless" target="_blank">looks at former City Council Speaker Christine Quinn's next chapter</a>, which she begins soon as head of a nonprofit combatting homelessness and its effects</li> <li dir="ltr">The Manhattan District Attorney's Office and John Jay College <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/witness-for-the-prosecution-1444946704" target="_blank">are partnering to open a new think tank</a> focused on prosecutorial training and practice.</li> <li dir="ltr">And, the Mets won their NLDS series against the Dodgers; they'll start the NLCS with the Cubs Saturday night at Citi Field in Queens.</li> </ul> <p><em>***<br />NOTE TO READERS: we hope you enjoy this new Gotham Gazette weekly feature - please share it if you do; on Twitter, use our handle&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank">@GothamGazette</a>.</em></p> <p><em>If you have feedback on this feature for us, you can email editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a></em></p> <p><em>Watch Sunday evening for our latest Week Ahead in New York Politics, which gives you a preview of key issues and events to be aware of for the week about to start. In the meantime, catch up on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government" target="_blank">the latest original reporting from Gotham Gazette here</a>. And have a great weekend!</em></p> <p><em>***</em><br />by Meg O'Connor and Ben Max</p> <p>Note: this article has been updated</p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2014/03/week_in_review_bus_readers.jpg" alt="week in review bus readers" width="600" height="409" /></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://blog.mcny.org/2012/04/24/a-ride-on-the-subway-in-1946-with-stanley-kubrick/" target="_blank">photo</a>: Stanley Kubrick via Museum of the City of New York</span></p> <hr /> <p>Gotham Gazette's Week in Review, Friday October 16</p> <p><strong>PHOTO OF THE WEEK:&nbsp;</strong>Mayor de Blasio and former Mayor David Dinkins at the ceremony naming The David N. Dinkins Municipal Building, via The Mayor's Office; Hillary Clinton and Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito at a protest rally in Las Vegas before the Democratic presidential debate, <a href="https://twitter.com/PedroJulio/status/653735190309703680" target="_blank">via Pedro Julio Serrano</a></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/BdB_Dinkins_via_mayors_office.jpg" alt="BdB Dinkins via mayors office" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="400" height="266" /></p> <p><img src="http://www.gothamgazette.com/images/HRC_MMV.jpg" alt="HRC MMV" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="400" height="400" /></p> <p><strong>TOP FIVE STORIES OF THE WEEK:</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>1. MTA Funding Deal:</strong> This past Saturday, after months of debate, city and state officials reached a <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/editorial-mta-capital-plan-finally-article-1.2393980" target="_blank">deal</a> over funding for the MTA’s capital plan. New York City will pay an additional $2.5 billion, while the state will contribute $8.3 billion to meet what was the outstanding need of the $26 billion plan to expand and repair the MTA system over the next five years. As part of the <a href="http://observer.com/2015/10/cuomo-and-de-blasio-bury-hatchet-in-mta-funding-fight/" target="_blank">deal</a>, the state cannot divert funds from the capital plan, as the state has repeatedly removed money from the MTA budget in the past. Questions remain, however, over how the state and the city plan to pay for their shares - Republican Senate Majority Leader John Flanagan has <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/exclusive-nys-eyes-ways-fund-8-3b-mta-article-1.2393330" target="_blank">said</a> his conference won’t support new taxes to pay for the commitment and questioned new borrowing. De Blasio’s team is expected to outline its plans as part of a reworked capital budget in 2016.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>2. De Blasio’s First Town Hall:</strong> Mayor de Blasio held the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/15/nyregion/mayor-de-blasio-at-rare-public-forum-presents-himself-as-a-protector-of-tenants.html?ref=nyregion&amp;_r=0" target="_blank">first town hall</a> of his mayoralty in Washington Heights on Wednesday evening. The mayor took questions from a crowd of about 250 during the two-hour town hall with a focus on rent security and tenant protection. The town hall seems to be <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5935-the-mayors-media-blitz-de-blasio" target="_blank">part of a shifting strategy</a> for public interaction that began in late August, when Mayor de Blasio began <a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5935-the-mayors-media-blitz-de-blasio" target="_blank">making more appearances on TV and radio shows</a>, as well as more formal in-person outreach to New Yorkers.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>3. Cuomo Team Returns to Puerto Rico:</strong> A delegation of New York State officials led by Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul returned to <a href="http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Hochul-to-lead-team-on-Puerto-Rico-trip-6565430.php" target="_blank">Puerto Rico</a> this week in an attempt to help the territory deal with its debt and health care crises. The delegation <a href="http://www.nystateofpolitics.com/2015/10/cuomo-admin-sends-more-help-to-puerto-rico/" target="_blank">included</a> Health Commissioner Howard Zucker, Medicaid Director Jason Helgerson, and Assemblymembers Marco Crespo and Richard Gottfried. Cuomo led the first delegation to Puerto Rico about a month ago.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>4. De Blasio to Israel:</strong> The mayor&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/15/nyregion/mayor-de-blasio-on-israel-trip-plans-visit-with-palestinians.html" target="_blank">headed to Israel</a> late Thursday to deliver a keynote address at the annual Conference of Mayors, where he will speak on the <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/mayor-de-blasio-israel-international-conference-article-1.2390617">topic</a> “Anti-Semitism in the West: How Cities Must Lead.” During the three-day trip, Mayor de Blasio will meet with Palestinians at a bilingual school in Jerusalem, a break from his predecessors, who only met with Israelis while visiting Israel in the past - though mayor won’t be meeting with official representatives of the Palestinian government. Questions remain around the private funding of de Blasio’s trip.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>5. Cuomo’s Common Core Task Force:</strong> Governor Cuomo's "Common Core Task Force"&nbsp;<a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/albany/2015/10/8579078/cuomos-common-core-panel-set-meet-next-week" target="_blank">met</a> for the first time Friday. The panel, made up of 15 educators, lawmakers, and business leaders, could suggest overhauling the Common Core standards in New York. Governor Cuomo <a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/albany/2015/09/8578053/new-task-force-familiar-faces-cuomo-wants-common-core-total-reboot" target="_blank">announced</a> a ‘total reboot’ of Common Core was necessary after roughly 20 percent of state students opted not to take standardized tests aligned with the tougher standards. On a related note, earlier in the week, the State Assembly education committee held a meeting on the state's most struggling schools. After Friday's meeting the Common Core Task Force announced plans for at least a dozen public forums and that it had appointed its first "student ambassador." [From September 29 when the task force had just been announced:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5913-absent-from-cuomos-new-education-task-force-a-student" target="_blank">Absent from Cuomo's New Education Task Force: A Student</a>]</p> <p><strong>THIS WEEK'S NUMBERS:</strong></p> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>$1.67 million</strong> in unclaimed funds have been <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/exclusive-nyc-finds-1-67m-lost-cash-state-registry-article-1.2393467" target="_blank">returned</a> to the city after Public Advocate Letitia James led a push for the city to recover money from New York’s unclaimed funds registry, which found that the city had more than 2,000 accounts with unclaimed funds.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>$174,000</strong>is outgoing Bronx District Attorney Robert Johnson’s new judicial <a href="http://nypost.com/2015/10/10/outgoing-bronx-da-to-score-300k-in-judge-salary-pension/" target="_blank">salary</a>, which he intends to collect in addition to his pension, which is estimated could be as much as $142,000 per year, according to The New York Post.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>41 months</strong> in federal prison for former Rikers correction officer Austin Romain for accepting over $11,000 in <a href="http://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/news/2015/10/13/former-rikers-correction-officer-who-accepted-more-than--11k-in-bribes-gets-41-months-in-federal-prison.html" target="_blank">bribes</a> as part of a scheme to distribute marijuana to Rikers inmates.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>3 states, 8 people, and over $100,000</strong> in <a href="http://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/criminal-justice/2015/10/14/eight-face-charges-in-connection-with-alleged-illegal-gun-smuggling-operation.html" target="_blank">illegal weapons</a> were involved in a gun-running ring busted by Brooklyn District Attorney Ken Thompson. 112 guns were sold to an undercover police officer during the year-long investigation into the gun-smuggling ring.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>11-year&nbsp;</strong>difference between the <a href="http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Community-Health-Profiles-Show-Disparity-Between-New-York-City-Neighborhoods-332607172.html" target="_blank">life expectancy</a> of residents of Brooklyn’s impoverished Brownsville neighborhood and the residents of Manhattan’s more affluent financial district.</li> </ul> <p><strong>THE GLORY AND THE GOAT:</strong></p> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>It was a good week for</strong> former New York City Mayor David Dinkins, who this week had the Manhattan Municipal Building <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/municipal-building-renamed-mayor-david-dinkins-article-1.2383824" target="_blank">renamed</a> in his honor.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>It was a bad week for</strong> Wendell Walters, former assistant commissioner of the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development, who was sentenced to three years in prison on Wednesday for accepting $2.5 million in <a href="http://goo.gl/hacbvH" target="_blank">bribes</a>.</li> </ul> <p><strong>THE FLASH:</strong></p> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>Around this time 103 years ago</strong>, on October 14, 1912, then-presidential candidate Teddy Roosevelt was <a href="http://www.politico.com/story/2007/10/roosevelt-shot-in-milwaukee-on-oct-14-1912-006332" target="_blank">shot</a> in the chest by a Manhattan man while campaigning in Milwaukee. He went on with a scheduled speech despite his wound.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>Around this time three years ago</strong>, on October 16, 2012, the FBI arrested Mohammed Nafis for plotting to <a href="http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2012/10/17/man-arrested-in-plot-to-blow-up-federal-reserve-bank-in-new-york/" target="_blank">detonate</a> a 1,000 pound car bomb in front of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.</li> </ul> <ul> <li dir="ltr"><strong>Around this time last year</strong>, on October 14, 2014, Mayor de Blasio kicked off two Hurricane Sandy-related employment programs in Queens as a means to better connect residents with <a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/city-hall/2014/10/8554657/de-blasio-kicks-sandy-jobs-programs-rockaways" target="_blank">jobs</a> and training programs in the storm-ravaged Rockaways.</li> </ul> <p><strong>GOTHAM GAZETTE HIGHLIGHTS OF THE WEEK:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5935-the-mayors-media-blitz-de-blasio" target="_blank">The Mayor's Media Blitz</a>, by Ben Max</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5934-reform-proposals-fly-as-panel-evaluates-ethics-watchdog" target="_blank">Reform Proposals Fly as Panel Evaluates Ethics Watchdog</a>, by Samar Khurshid</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5933-measuring-the-mayors-education-agenda" target="_blank">Measuring the Mayor’s Education Agenda</a>, by Kaela Sanborn-Hum</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/opinion/5932-albany-transparency-and-the-mta-funding-deal-show-us-our-money" target="_blank">Albany Transparency and the MTA Funding Deal: Show Us Our Money</a>, by John Kaehny (opinion)</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong><span face="Times New Roman">MORE FOR THE WEEKEND:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li dir="ltr">Gotham Gazette's David King <a href="http://www.twcnews.com/nys/capital-region/capital-tonight-interviews/2015/10/9/reporter-roundtable-100915.html" target="_blank">appeared on last Capital Tonight's reporters roundtable</a>&nbsp;to discuss the latest in New York state politics [video].</li> <li dir="ltr">Politico New York's Azi Paybarah <a href="http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/city-hall/2015/10/8579843/quinns-next-chapter-working-homeless" target="_blank">looks at former City Council Speaker Christine Quinn's next chapter</a>, which she begins soon as head of a nonprofit combatting homelessness and its effects</li> <li dir="ltr">The Manhattan District Attorney's Office and John Jay College <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/witness-for-the-prosecution-1444946704" target="_blank">are partnering to open a new think tank</a> focused on prosecutorial training and practice.</li> <li dir="ltr">And, the Mets won their NLDS series against the Dodgers; they'll start the NLCS with the Cubs Saturday night at Citi Field in Queens.</li> </ul> <p><em>***<br />NOTE TO READERS: we hope you enjoy this new Gotham Gazette weekly feature - please share it if you do; on Twitter, use our handle&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/GothamGazette" target="_blank">@GothamGazette</a>.</em></p> <p><em>If you have feedback on this feature for us, you can email editor Ben Max:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com"></a><a href="mailto:bmax@gothamgazette.com">bmax@gothamgazette.com</a></em></p> <p><em>Watch Sunday evening for our latest Week Ahead in New York Politics, which gives you a preview of key issues and events to be aware of for the week about to start. In the meantime, catch up on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government" target="_blank">the latest original reporting from Gotham Gazette here</a>. And have a great weekend!</em></p> <p><em>***</em><br />by Meg O'Connor and Ben Max</p> <p>Note: this article has been updated</p>