Quantcast

Gotham Gazette

The Place for New York Policy and politics

Citizens Union
 

Michael Grimm

Michael Grimm

  • joe crowley voting

    Rep. Joe Crowley votes (photo: @JoeCrowleyNY)


    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s upset primary defeat of Representative Joe Crowley has sent shockwaves through both the New York and national political worlds.

    The 28-year-old Latina democratic-socialist who has never held elected office and refused money from corporate PACs stood in stark contrast to Crowley, a 56-year-old, ten-term Congressional representative who was a prolific Democratic Party fundraiser, served as the chair of the Queens Democratic Party, and was seen by some as the next Democratic Speaker of the

    ...
  • ocasio-cortez campaign buttons

    Ocasio-Cortez campaign buttons (image via @Ocasio2018)


    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a 28-year-old self-identified democratic socialist, unseated 10-term Congressional representative and Queens Democratic Party leader Joe Crowley in a dramatic upset quickly having ripple effects both locally and nationally. And she won handily, by about 4,000 votes and a 57.5 to 42.5 percent margin.

    Crowley entered the House in 1999 and maintained a largely center-left voting record; he was seen as a strong contender to become the next Democratic Speaker of the House,

    ...
  • grimm donovan ny1

    Rep. Donovan, left, and former Rep. Grimm on NY1


    Perhaps the most-watched congressional primary in New York ahead of Tuesday’s vote is the Republican contest centered on Staten Island, where former Congressional Representative Michael Grimm is attempting to unseat incumbent Representative Dan Donovan in what has been a nasty, hard-fought race with a heavy focus on President Donald Trump.

    The district, which includes all of Staten Island and a sliver of southern Brooklyn, is home to many Trump supporters, especially in the Republican primary, and both

    ...
  • trump dan donovan

    Rep. Dan Donovan with President Trump (photo: @DanDonovanSI)


    New Yorkers will head to the polls on Tuesday, June 26 to vote in Democratic and Republican congressional primary elections, determining which candidates will appear on the parties’ ballots in November’s general election. Not every one of New York’s 27 congressional districts is home to one or two primaries, but some districts are in the midst of competitive primary campaigns.

    In New York City, where just one seat in the House of Representatives delegation is held by a Republican, there are several

    ...