STATE RACES
ASSEMBLY DISTRICT 84
ABOUT EYE ON ALBANY

Highbridge, Melrose, Longwood, Mott Haven, Port Morris, Hunts Point

GENERAL ELECTION RESULTS
Take a look at all the latest results for the November 5, 2002 general election.

x-Carmen E. Arroyo (Dem) 8,845 - 86 percent
Pedro Gautier Espada (Ind) 1,371 - 13 percent
Andrew Osterczy (Con) 98 - 1 percent

Candidates:

  • Carmen E. Arroyo (Rep/Lib) Incumbent
  • Andrew Osterczy (Con)


BIOGRAPHIES

Carmen E. Arroyo (Rep/Lib) graduated Sixto Febus Business School, in Puerto Rico where she received her Secretarial-Bookkeeper degree. She also has degrees from Hostos Community College and the College of New Rochelle. Arroyo was elected to the State Assembly in a special election in February 1994. She is a member of the following committees: Alcoholism & Drug Abuse, Children & Families, Education, and Aging. She was appointed Chair of the Subcommittee on Bilingual Education during the 1996 Legislative Session.


7 BILLS IMPORTANT TO NEW YORK CITY RESIDENTS THAT YOUR STATE REPRESENTATIVE IS LIKELY TO VOTE ON IN THE NEXT TERM:

1. Rent Regulation: The current rent regulation laws expire in June 2003. Supporters of rent regulation hope that the current provisions will be extended for another five years and that the legislature will repeal the provision which deregulates apartments that rent for $2,000 or more a month. The State Assembly passed such a bill this year, but it died in the Senate in the face of opposition from Majority Leader Joseph Bruno. If the Legislature does not take concerted action in June, rent regulation in New York City will end.

In 2002 Assemblymember Arroyo voted in favor of repealing vacancy decontrol, the law that permits landlords to increase rent 18 percent automatically whenever a tenant moves out.

2. Commuter Tax: In 1999, when the State Legislature repealed the Commuter Tax, the city's economy was good. Reinstatement of the Commuter Tax is likely to come up again this Spring as the City's economy takes a turn for the worse.

In 1999 Assemblymember Arroyo voted in favor of repealing the commuter tax.

3. School Funding: Even with mayoral control of the school system, more than 40 percent of New York City's school funding comes from Albany. Next year's budget will determine how much money New York City's schools will get from the state.

4. Rockefeller drug laws: New York's drug laws, passed in 1973 by Governor Nelson Rockefeller, are among the harshest in the nation. The Democratic-controlled Assembly, Republican-controlled Senate, and the Governor have not been able to agree on how to reform these laws, look for renewed negotiations and new legislation in the next term.

5. Minimum Wage: Currently set at $5.15 an hour, Democrats will likely propose raising the minimum wage to $6.75 an hour, a proposal that passed the Assembly, but failed to ever get to the floor of the Senate last year.

Raising Minimum Wage - vote on A5132
In 2002 Assemblymember Arroyo voted in favor of raising the minimum wage.

6. Sexual Orientation Non Discrimination Act: This has been floating around the New York State Legislature for 30 years, with the Governor's support, it is likely to come up for a vote again next Spring.

7. Campaign Finance Reform: Some 80 organizations have proposed a "Clean Money, Clean Elections" bill for the New York State Legislature. Like the New York City law, it would establish a system under which candidates who comply with limits on campaign spending and contributions Last year, Speaker Sheldon Silver introduced a bill to provide two-to-one public matching of campaign contributions. The bill passed the Assembly, but it died in the Senate in the face of opposition from Majority Leader Joseph Bruno.

In 2002 Assemblymember Arroyo was absent for the vote on public matching of campaign contributions.


PRIMARY ELECTION - SEPTEMBER 10, 2002

Candidates:
  • Carmen E. Arroyo (Rep/Lib - Winner of Special 10/15 Democratic Primary) Incumbent
  • Pedro G. Espada (Dem)
  • Andrew Osterczy (Con)
  • Eddie Rosa (Dropped Out)
  • Jose Velez (Dem)

BIOGRAPHIES

Pedro G. Espada (Dem) was a member of the New York City Council from 1998 through 2002. He also served as a member of the New York State Assembly from February through December of 1996. Before his election to office in 1996, Espada was a community activist in the Bronx. He has taken courses at Fordham University, but does not hold a degree from that institution.

October 16, 2002

Assemblymember Carmen Arroyo beat challenger Pedro Gautier Espada last night in a special Democratic runoff in the Bronx, according to unofficial results. With all the precincts reporting, Arroyo held a slight lead over the former city councilman in the 84th Assembly District centered in the Mott Haven and Hunts Point sections. (Newsday)

October 14, 2002

Assemblymember Carmen Arroyo's frenetic schedule is intended to persuade the residents of the 84th Assembly District to vote for her in a new primary election tomorrow to determine the Democratic candidate in the Nov. 5 election.While Ms. Arroyo was dashing about the South Bronx, her opponent, Pedro Gautier Espada, the former councilman, led a team of campaign workers who were placing large red signs along the streets of the district. He then had a similarly hectic schedule. Though rare in New York City's political world, second primary elections occasionally occur. This one, in a district that includes Hunts Point and Mott Haven, comes after the Sept. 10 primary, which Ms. Arroyo lost by five votes, according to the initial Board of Elections tally. (New York Times)

October 3, 2002

Three weeks after a Democratic primary for an Assembly seat in the Bronx ended in a five-vote difference between candidates, a State Supreme Court judge ruled yesterday that a new election be held on Oct. 15. (New York Times)

September 25, 2002

Amid allegations of poll irregularities, a State Supreme Court justice ordered the City Board of Elections yesterday to delay the certification of the results of the Democratic primary in Bronx races for the State Senate and Assembly. (New York Times) (Daily News)

September 19, 2002

In one of the most memorable - and turbulent - Bronx primary races in recent memory, state Sen. Pedro Espada Jr. and veteran South Bronx Assemblywoman Carmen Arroyo appeared yesterday to be losers after a vote recount. (Daily News)

September 13, 2002

Board of Elections officials will begin recounts today in two hotly contested Bronx races from Tuesday's Democratic primary. One contest, between incumbent South Bronx Assemblywoman Carmen Arroyo and former City Councilman Pedro G. Espada in the South Bronx's 84th Assembly District, ended in an almost unheard-of dead heat. The other - a down-to-the-wire race in Senate District 32 between incumbent state Senator Pedro Espada Jr. and party-backed City Councilman Ruben Diaz Sr. - ended with Diaz holding a 162-vote lead and proclaiming victory. But Espada Jr. is challenging the results in court and will have the votes recounted. (Daily News)

Eye On Albany 2002 is a guide to the races for the 91 seats of the New York State Legislature that represent residents of New York City.

Learn more about Eye On Albany

For a street map and demographic information about this district please click here

This website is brought to you by Citizens Union Foundation and is made possible by grants from
the Charles H. Revson Foundation, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the New York Times Foundation and viewers like you.

bronx statenisland queens manhattan brooklyn