STATE RACES
STATE SENATE DISTRICT 22
ABOUT EYE ON ALBANY

Bay Ridge, Dyker Heights, Bensonhurst, Bath Beach, southern Sunset Park, Boro Park, St. George, Stapleton, Rosebank, Dongan Hills, Grassmere, New Dorp, South Beach, Midland Beach, Arrochas, Thompkinsville, Clifton.

GENERAL ELECTION RESULTS
Take a look at all the latest results for the November 5, 2002 general election.

x-Martin J. Golden (Rep) 25,209 - 56 percent
Vincent J. Gentile (Dem) 19,942 - 44 percent

Candidates:

  • Vincent Gentile (Dem/Ind/Wor) Incumbent
  • Martin J. Golden (Rep/Con)


CAMPAIGN FEATURE

Voters in the 22nd Senate District in Brooklyn will find two familiar names on the ballot on November 5.

Democrat Vincent Gentile has already served two terms in the State Senate, although the district lines have been redrawn. Republican Martin Golden represents a significant portion of the district in the New York City Council. Voters also get a preview of the general election race earlier this fall when Golden and Gentile battled in the Independence Party primary. Gentile won by 8 votes out of 100 cast.

Residents may have also read about the race in their local newspapers. Unlike many races for the State Legislature, the campaign for District 22 has received attention by the press, if primarily for its negative campaigning. The big campaign story has been an event that occurred in 1978. According to police records, Golden, a former police officer, lost his gun more than two decades ago and was disciplined by the department. Gentile made the disclosure of the records, which had not been released until recently, an issue.

EDUCATION
When it comes to education, Gentile and Golden have a similar answer to the city's schools: funding. The candidates agree that vouchers and the elimination of school boards will not solve the problems.

COMMUTER TAX
Similarly, Gentile and Golden both favor bringing back the commuter tax. Both Gentile and Golden oppose taxes. Gentile worked to rescinded sales taxes on clothing purchases under a set limit. This year in the City Council, Golden voted against raising taxes on cigarettes and cell phones.

HUMAN RIGHTS AND ROCKEFELLER DRUG LAWS
Differences between the two candidates are apparent on issues like State Human Rights Law and the Rockefeller Drug Laws. Gentile favors the inclusion of sexual orientation in the State Human Rights Law, while Golden opposes it. Golden does not believe that the Rockefeller drug laws need to be revised. Gentile, on the other hand, thinks that judges should have more power to place drug users in treatment programs.

CAMPAIGN FINANCE
Both Gentile and Golden are supporters of public campaign financing and putting checks on the fundraising and lobbying process of campaigns. However, Gentile believes that there should be a ceiling on campaign spending, while Golden does not support spending limits. Golden believes that unlimited campaign spending allows challengers running against an incumbent to educate the neighborhood about their stance on issues.

HOW ALBANY WORKS
Golden says that his presence in the Republican Senate majority will give him a greater ability to fight for his district. Gentile believes that the Senate has ignored the minority party, created gridlock in Albany, and shortchanged Brooklyn.

-Posted October 23, 2002


BIOGRAPHIES

Senator Vincent Gentile (Dem/Ind/Wor) was re-elected to the New York State Senate for a third term in 2000. Gentile graduated from Fort Hamilton High School, Cornell University, and earned a law degree from Fordham University. Before his election to the senate, Gentile was a prosecutor in the district attorney's office. Gentile sits on the Codes Committee and is a member of the Crime Victims, Crime and Corrections Committee.

* * * * * *

Martin Golden (Rep/Con) is the current councilmember for New York City Council District 43, barred by term limits for running for reelection in 2003. Before becoming a councilmember, he was a New York City police officer and served on Community Board 10. Golden, who attended the New York School of Printing and John Jay College, also owns a catering hall.

7 BILLS IMPORTANT TO NEW YORK CITY RESIDENTS THAT YOUR STATE REPRESENTATIVE IS LIKELY TO VOTE ON IN THE NEXT TERM:

1. Rent Regulation: The current rent regulation laws expire in June 2003. Supporters of rent regulation hope that the current provisions will be extended for another five years and that the legislature will repeal the provision which deregulates apartments that rent for $2,000 or more a month. The State Assembly passed such a bill this year, but it died in the Senate in the face of opposition from Majority Leader Joseph Bruno. If the Legislature does not take concerted action in June, rent regulation in New York City will end.

2. Commuter Tax: In 1999, when the State Legislature repealed the Commuter Tax, the city's economy was good. Reinstatement of the Commuter Tax is likely to come up again this Spring as the City's economy takes a turn for the worse.

In 1999 Senator Gentile voted against the repeal of the commuter tax .

3. School Funding: Even with mayoral control of the school system, more than 40 percent of New York City's school funding comes from Albany. Next year's budget will determine how much money New York City's schools will get from the state.

4. Rockefeller drug laws: New York's drug laws, passed in 1973 by Governor Nelson Rockefeller, are among the harshest in the nation. The Democratic-controlled Assembly, Republican-controlled Senate, and the Governor have not been able to agree on how to reform these laws, look for renewed negotiations and new legislation in the next term.

5. Minimum Wage: Currently set at $5.15 an hour, Democrats will likely propose raising the minimum wage to $6.75 an hour, a proposal that failed last year.

6. Sexual Orientation Non Discrimination Act: This has been floating around the New York State Legislature for 30 years, with the Governor's support, it is likely to come up for a vote again next Spring.

7. Campaign Finance Reform: Some 80 organizations have proposed a "Clean Money, Clean Elections" bill for the New York State Legislature. Like the New York City law, it would establish a system under which candidates who comply with limits on campaign spending and contributions would receive public funds for their political campaigns.

HOW OTHER ORGANIZATIONS RANKED SENATOR VINCENT GENTILE:

EMPIRE STATE PRIDE AGENDA

Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act

The Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act adds actual or perceived sexual orientation to the state's existing laws which prohibit discrimination in employment, housing, public accommodations, education, and credit on the basis of age, race, creed, color, national origin, sex, disability or marital status.

Pride Agenda's Position: SUPPORT
Vincent Gentile's Position: SUPPORT

Hate Crimes Act

The Hate Crimes Act enhances criminal penalties for a long list of crimes in which perpetrators intentionally select a target based on the victim's actual or perceived race, color, national origin, ancestry, gender, religion, religious practice, age, disability or sexual orientation. The Hate Crimes Act also requires the state to collect, analyze and annually report on data regarding hate crimes throughout the state.

Pride Agenda's Position: SUPPORT
Vincent Gentile's Position: SUPPORT

THE BUSINESS COUNCIL OF NEW YORK STATE

Taxable Status of Nuclear-Powered Electrical Generating Facilities Act

This measure establishes that nuclear powered electric generating facilities must pay property tax.

BC of NYS Position: SUPPORT
Vincent Gentile's Position: SUPPORT

Plumbing Standards

This measure creates a new article in labor laws by providing standards for plumbing materials and makes certain plumbing and piping provisions of the state uniform fire prevention and building code.

BC of NYS Position: OPPOSITION
Vincent Gentile's Position: SUPPORT

October 24, 2002

New York Times endorses Liz Krueger in the 26th State Senate Distrct and Vincent Gentil in the 22nd State Senate District. (New York Times)

October 9, 2002

The prevailing sentiment in the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Bay Ridge, Dyker Heights and Bensonhurst, which are included in the 22nd State Senate District is that it is going to be a close race for State Senate. Vicent Gentile, the incumbent, is being challenged by City Councilman Martin J. Golden, a Republican who is waging a tough battle in an area where the Republicans believe they can regain a seat. (New York Times)

October 3, 2002

After admitting he was once disciplined by the Police Department for losing his gun, cop-turned-City Councilman Martin Golden will release his NYPD record.Golden (R-Bay Ridge), who is battling state Sen. Vincent Gentile (D-Bay Ridge) to represent the newly created 22nd Senate District, has been under pressure for years to release his record. (NY Daily News)

August 21, 2002

Suspicious signatures on a nominating petition got a surprise candidate for the newly-created 22nd State Senate District thrown off of the Conservative Party ballot.The names of a judge and a dead man were among the signatures on a petition nominating Ira Rudolph, 55, for a spot on the party's primary ballot, said party spokesman Jerry Kassar. (New York Daily News)

Eye On Albany 2002 is a guide to the races for the 91 seats of the New York State Legislature that represent residents of New York City.

Learn more about Eye On Albany

For a street map and demographic information about this district please click here

This website is brought to you by Citizens Union Foundation and is made possible by grants from
the Charles H. Revson Foundation, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the New York Times Foundation and viewers like you.

bronx statenisland queens manhattan brooklyn