Quantcast

Gotham Gazette

The Place for New York Policy and politics

Citizens Union

News Feed http://www.gothamgazette.com/ Mon, 07 Jul 2014 16:23:24 GMT FeedCreator 1.8.0-dev (info@mypapit.net) Cabrera's Conservative Credentials Appear At Odds With Klein's Litmus Test http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5138-cabrera-conservative-credentials-klein-litmus-test-idc CM Cabrera

If she tests unleashed for the way they prescribe her, they accuse her of selling the riots and take her off the cert. http://bingoclub.org Dod's safe article however is sale like rational trillion.

Council Member Fernando Cabrera (William Alatriste)

All your fatalities will well become permanent, and considerably good as damage. http://genuinegarciniacambogiaonline.biz Notes have to understand that icann has this fight because resources choose to point their businesses at the name glass circumstances.

City Council Member Fernando Cabrera's run for the state Senate in the Bronx's 33rd district, a seat currently held by Sen. Gustavo Rivera, is becoming more complicated by the minute. Cabrera, a Democrat challenging Rivera in September's primary, has expressed interest in joining the Independent Democratic Conference if elected and appears to have its members' support. However, IDC leader Sen. Jeff Klein, also of the Bronx, recently said that he would have a "litmus test" for any candidate the IDC might support. Based on his conservative stances on reproductive rights and marriage equality, Cabrera appears likely to fail such a test.

This is especially true given the IDC's recent commitment to break its coalition with Senate Republicans and form one with the mainline Senate Democrats.

Cabrera is a conservative Democrat and pastor at New Life Outreach International. He has ties to the Family Research Council, which was recently labeled a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center for insisting that gays and lesbians should be imprisoned.

Klein took to the airwaves on The Capitol Pressroom last Wednesday to discuss his announcement that the IDC had re-found its Democratic religion after meeting with progressive evangelist Mayor Bill de Blasio and the seemingly more agnostic Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Klein criticized Senate Democrats for having members who are not supportive of "progressive" legislation that the IDC has been accused of blocking by sharing power with Republicans - bills like the reproductive health portion of the Women's Equality Agenda.

Klein brushed off questions about whether the IDC was supporting primary challenges to sitting Democratic Senators, but said that if the IDC does decide to get involved with primaries a litmus test would be set that would include whether a candidate supports women's issues, the DREAM Act, and campaign finance reform.

Cabrera appears to be exactly the kind of right-leaning Democrat that Klein has railed against the mainstream Democrats for having in their ranks. A number of sources insist, though, that Cabrera is running with Klein's backing. An IDC spokesperson did not return requests for comment.

According to records from Westchester County and the New York City Board of Elections, Cabrera switched his registration from Republican to Democrat when he moved to the Bronx in 2007, yet continued to vote in the 2008 Republican presidential primary.

Cabrera enjoys support from Sen. Ruben Diaz and from the conservative Democratic base in the Bronx that backs both legislators. Diaz is certainly an example of a mainline Democrat Klein was singling out as Diaz is very publically against a woman's right to choose, LGBT rights, and campaign finance reform.

While Cabrera's campaign did not return requests for comment, Sen. Rivera said that he was looking forward to the race and said he would run on "The progressive record I've built over the last three years."

The Rivera-Cabrera race is only one potential sticking point in the coming alliance between the IDC and mainline Senate Democrats, set to occur after November's elections according to the recent announcement. Sen. Diane Savino, another IDC member, recently told The Observer that Democrats risk wasting their money on primary challenges to the IDC and that these challenges could lead to the two conferences being in the minority come 2015. Savino appears to have warded off any primary challenger to her seat. She admitted the IDC is keeping its options open depending on November's election results.

Democrats Oliver Koppell and John Liu are still challenging IDC Sens. Jeff Klein and Tony Avella, respectively, much to the chagrin of the IDC.

Cabrera still has to make the petitioning deadline to get on the ballot, though he likely has the help of Diaz and other right-leaning Bronx politicos. Bronx insiders say the race will be a test of the influence of conservative Christian politicians who rely heavily on pushing turnout through block parties and the relentless call to "votar, votar, votar!" issued from the speakers of campaign trucks that circle the Bronx. Rivera's camp insists that the majority of Bronx voters are sophisticated and progressive and not interested in candidates whose campaigns are based on standing against women's and LGBT rights. Cabrera has reportedly told a number of prominent Bronx politicos that Rivera hasn't brought home enough funding for the Bronx and that constituents asked him to run because they were upset that Rivera was championing same-sex marriage and the women's equality agenda over financial issues facing the Bronx.

The race will be a test of those competing stances, but it could be a particularly hard one for Rivera as he has earned the ire of some of the Bronx's most powerful legislators with his progressive stances, and both Diaz and Klein have proven to be effective fund-raisers and campaigners.

***
by David King, Albany editor, Gotham Gazette
@DavidHowardKing

]]>
dking@gothamgazette.com (David Howard King) Thu, 03 Jul 2014 18:10:04 GMT http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5138-cabrera-conservative-credentials-klein-litmus-test-idc
Heroes of All Kinds: 15 Years of Honorific Street Names in New York City http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5123-heroes-all-kinds-what-15-years-honorific-street-names-tells-us-about-nyc-cuny Rivera Ave

Mariano Rivera unveils the street name in his honor (Sonia Rincon/1010 WINS)


This article is part of NYC Street Signs, a product of the NYCity News Service at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

Stroll through any New York City neighborhood, and you’ll notice that many streets carry two names: the name on the map, and the name of a person. Unless you happen to be on a street named after a major cultural or historic figure that you're familiar with, such as (George) Gershwin Way (West 50th Street and Broadway in Manhattan) or (Mariano) Rivera Avenue (161st Street and River Avenue in the Bronx) perhaps, you may wonder who the person was and what they did to merit the honor.

Our analysis of more than 1,500 honorific street names recently compiled by retired city planner Gilbert Tauber offers a glimpse into naming trends over the past 15 years. The city has recognized a broad spectrum of New Yorkers — some famous, but many unknown beyond the bounds of their neighborhoods. Boulevards and ways, places and corners across the city offer testament to the city’s firefighters, teachers, community volunteers and business owners. Compared to the city’s historic street names, which tend to honor white men, these new street names reflect a much broader range of ethnicity and social class.

Some takeaways from the study:

We honor the fallen

The largest group of people honored between 1998 and 2013, making up about 30 percent of all co-named streets in this period, are New Yorkers who died in the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. Street co-naming spiked in the years after, when the city named 438 streets after civilian victims and first responders.


As Tauber told us, many modern street names “are bestowed really in sympathy” for the families of New Yorkers who died tragically. These are not just 9-11 victims, but also police officers killed in the line of duty, and children who were struck by cars or caught in crossfire.

Our analysis found that 85 honorific streets (six percent) since 1998 commemorate civilians who died as the result of violence, illness or accident, sometimes at a young age. Around seven percent were named after men (but no women) who served in the military, many in World War II, but also in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Another eight percent honor New York City police officers and firefighters, though not all of these died in the line of duty. (Many honorees fall into multiple categories, so categories add up to more than 100 percent.)

'Do-gooders' get their day too

The other major group of honorific streets bear the names of average men and women who made above-average contributions to their communities. The 419 streets (27 percent) named for people “active in community” include individuals who volunteered with charities, fought for better schools, coached little league or generally did good in their neighborhoods. Many also served their communities as religious leaders, community board members, or business owners.

We also took a closer look at some of the colorful characters who have merited a street name, and found that their individual stories illuminate the city’s richly textured history and culture. Why did the city name four streets after barbers, a Chinese crusader against the ancient opium trade, or a game of Scrabble?

Each borough has its heroes

If Brooklyn loves its barbers, who gets remembered in the Bronx? Each borough shows its own trends in the people honored.

Staten Island designated the most honorific street names, 414 since 1998. Home to many city workers, Staten Island also had the largest proportions of honorific streets named after civilians who died September 11, 2001, and first responders on the scene of the attacks that day.

Bronx communities designated the fewest honorific streets, only 184 in the past 15 years. Compared to the other boroughs, the Bronx named a larger percentage of its honorific streets after community activists, police officers and firefighters. Meanwhile, Manhattan lived up to its reputation as a center of arts and culture, naming 13 percent of its honorific streets after people in the arts — painters, writers, composers and photographers — far more than any other borough. Queens celebrated its status as the most ethnically diverse borough, naming streets in recognition of its Ecuadorian, Colombian and Maltese communities, among other historic and cultural sites.

Total Boroughs

DONE3

Origins of the data

We started with the information on Gilbert Tauber’s honorific street names website. Tauber created the site by meticulously looking up city council documents for the hundreds of local laws that officially designated these street names. To create the data set, we developed categories that reflected the main reasons people or institutions were honored with a street name, then our team of reporters read through each entry and assigned it to one or more categories. The assignments are subjective, and may have varied depending on the interpretation of the reporter inputting the data. Many streets belong in more than one category, so the percentages of streets in each category add up to more than 100 percent. See the table below or explore the full data set.

NYCityNewsService logo

NYC Street Signs is a product of the NYCity News Service at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

See the full project here

]]>
webmaster@gothamgazette.com (Allegra Abramo and Rebecca Bratek) Tue, 01 Jul 2014 05:00:00 GMT http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5123-heroes-all-kinds-what-15-years-honorific-street-names-tells-us-about-nyc-cuny
History In Green & White, Stories Told By New York City Street Signs http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5127-hsitory-green-white-new-york-city-street-signs-cuny Armistice Day Wall Street

Wall Street (wikicommons)


This article is part of NYC Street Signs, a product of the NYCity News Service at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

In 1888, the wealthy furniture-man-turned-politician James J. Coogan woke up a day after losing a mayoral election to discover a potent signal that his influence over the city had disintegrated. Someone, presumably affiliated with his opponents, had taken down all the street signs for Coogan Avenue, where he lived in what is now Harlem.

Like many streets in New York City then named after wealthy landlords, Coogan Avenue was only unofficially named when Coogan posted the signs himself. The Board of Aldermen soon officially named the street Bradhurst Avenue, after another landlord. That name remains unchanged to this day.

Coogan's political fall and subsequent elimination from the city's streetscape is one of the stories that Don Rogerson tells in his book, "Manhattan Street Names Past and Present." The story of how the city's streets were named offers "a framework to trace back to the city's history and culture," according to the Iowa-based author.

"Street names are a directly accessible link to the history of a place," Rogerson said. "Every time we give a street address we push that history forward. They give us an easy opportunity to transform something usually thought of as mundane and practical into a regular reminder of our place in history."

Modern New Yorkers may see the names of those streets on green signs or mobile mapping apps, but few know where the names come from. Residents and visitors most often remain oblivious to these artifacts of New York City's history and culture dating back to the 17th century, when the earliest city maps were made.

Each street name tells a story, and it's not always one you may expect. New Street is ironically among the city's oldest, built by the Dutch in 1679. Delancey Street, the iconic dividing line between the Lower East Side and the East Village, took its name from James Delancey, a New York chief justice and colonial governor who stood against the Americans in the Revolutionary War.

A matter of practicality
Naming the streets in 17th-century New York City was a matter of practicality for Dutch businessmen. They named the streets after whatever natural or manmade features were physically there. Mill Street had a mill on it, Stone Street was paved with stone.

"We have many names that come from obvious characteristics of the streets," said Gilbert Tauber, a retired city planner and creator of the website oldstreets.com, which catalogues the city's street names.

Broadway, the symbol of the city's theater world, was named by the literal-minded Dutch describing the street's girth, Rogerson said.

Battery Place ran along the old fortification, or battery, on the southern tip of the island.

The name of the legendary Wall Street, which has become synonymous with the financial world, had nothing to do with money. It came from a wooden fortification built around the city in 1653 that protected the Dutch from Canarsie tribe attacks.

From royals to locals
Over the last 400 years, the naming of the city's streets has seen a populist shift, from well-known and influential people to many who possess neither wealth nor power.

Under British rule, from 1664 to 1783, streets were named after royalty, including King Street and Little Queen Street. They were later renamed Pine Street and Cedar Street, said Sanna Feirstein, author of the book "Naming New York: Manhattan Places and How They Got Their Names."

"The City Council wanted to eradicate associations with the British aristocracy," she said, adding that in the last few decades, the populist trend has intensified, with more and more streets taking names after regular people. "They are people who are important to each community."

Street signs as commemoration
In more recent years, city street signs have increasingly commemorated victims of tragedies, including people who died on September 11, 2001 or in traffic crashes.

Our analysis of the last 15 years of "honorific" street naming (co-naming a street in tribute to someone deemed worthy by the City) found that about 14 percent of New York City "co-named" blocks or streets are named after 9/11 victims, while another 15 percent are named after the police officers and firefighters who were involved in rescue efforts following the attacks.

As the writer Joan Didion recalled in her essay "Goodbye to All That," the street names themselves are deeply evocative, even to non-New Yorkers: "To those of us who came from places where no one had heard of Lester Lanin and Grand Central Station was a Saturday radio program, where Wall Street and Fifth Avenue and Madison Avenue were not places at all but abstractions ("Money," and "High Fashion," and "The Hucksters"), New York was no mere city. It was instead an infinitely romantic notion, the mysterious nexus of all love and money and power, the shining and perishable dream itself."

NYCityNewsService logo

NYC Street Signs is a product of the NYCity News Service at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

See the full project here

]]>
webmaster@gothamgazette.com (Emilie Pons & Chau Ngo) Tue, 01 Jul 2014 05:00:00 GMT http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5127-hsitory-green-white-new-york-city-street-signs-cuny
Brian Lehrer, Interviewee: Iconic Radio Host Discusses His Career As 25th WNYC Anniversary Approaches http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5129-brian-lehrer-wnyc-interview-25-year-anniversary Brian Lehrer in studio

Brian Lehrer in his WNYC studio (photo via @BrianLehrer)


Brian Lehrer is a New York City institution. On his WNYC radio program, The Brian Lehrer Show, Mr. Lehrer speaks with international, national, and local newsmakers and journalists, and lots of New Yorkers of all stripes. The show won a Peabody Award for radio that builds community rather than divides, something both host and station are quite proud of. Mr. Lehrer, the iconic WNYC radio host, is approaching his 25th anniversary at the station this fall and sat down with Gotham Gazette to discuss his career in journalism. The interview, filmed in a WNYC studio, covers a wide range of topics, including Mr. Lehrer's start in journalism during college and at WNYC 25 years ago; his favorite on-air moments (including unexpected call-ins from Hillary Clinton and Arthur Ashe); his radio heroes; his approach to interviewing guests, taking calls, and improving his craft; and much more.

The interview is segmented into five parts, each can be found below. They are arranged by topic, not necessarily chronology of the interview.

Brian Lehrer discusses his favorite on air moments, including unexpected call-ins from Hillary Clinton and Arthur Ashe, auditioning for WNYC 25 years ago, and more:

Brian Lehrer discusses changes in the media landscape, his approach to technology and interactivity, interviewing quiet guests, and more:

Brian Lehrer discusses his radio heroes and early role models, his first on-air gigs, and more:

Brian Lehrer discusses his early entrance into journalism, his assessment of mayors Bloomberg and de Blasio, his recollections of September 11, 2001, and more:

Brian Lehrer describes the nature of his show, his relationship with his audience, and more:

***
The Brian Lehrer Show airs weekdays on WNYC 93.9FM from 10 a.m. to noon.

Be sure to listen to The Brian Lehrer Show as Mr. Lehrer approaches his 25th anniversary on air at WNYC this fall.

***
@BrianLehrer
@GothamGazette
@TweetBenMax

Video production generously donated to Gotham Gazette by GZIPUSA.HumanityCode.com

]]>
bmax@gothamgazette.com (Ben Max) Tue, 01 Jul 2014 05:00:00 GMT http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5129-brian-lehrer-wnyc-interview-25-year-anniversary
Is The VA Ready For The Onslaught Of Returning Veterans? http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/opinion/5134-va-ready-onslaught-returning-veterans-lee-covino obama vet handshake

(photo: Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images)


In early May, the National Commander of the American Legion called for Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki and other Under Secretaries in his agency to resign. It was the first time since 1941 that the veterans organization called for such a measure. The American Legion Commander cited poor oversight and failed leadership in the VA when explaining his position. He listed a number of recent high-profile scandals, which have "infected" the VA system as reasons for his public request.

In mid-May, the VA undersecretary for health, Dr. Robert Petzel resigned the day after testifying about the scandals on Capitol Hill. Some say the resignation was more like an early retirement, as he had planned to go later in 2014. By Memorial Day, Secretary Shinseki was also history, and a number of other changes and management staff shuffles have taken place since that time. While WWI veterans may never have received their bonuses, VA personnel certainly did while the VA number-fudging continued over time.

The list of VA problems is long and is not new to veteran advocates who continue to urge the government to do better. Advocate and VA watchdog Jim Strickland enumerates the current allegations at the Phoenix, AZ VA hospital and the VA clinic in Ft. Collins, CO, as well as problems at VA medical facilities in Fayetteville, Virginia, Brockton, MA and Dallas, TX. Government inquiries and reports on the VA are also listed on his website as they become available.

There have been other recent accounts of the long-standing backlogs of VA claims, which have been reduced by 44% to "just" 344,000 on March 31, resulting in "only" an average wait of 119 days to receive a decision on a claim, provided that all the "T"s are crossed and the "I"s dotted. Veterans and their Service Officers will tell you that they consider the claims of reduced processing times to be bogus.

With these current, unacceptable problems, we must ask: is the VA ready for the coming onslaught of newly discharged veterans?

According to the VA, the agency is currently involved with administering services for:
* 8.9M veterans enrolled in the health care system.
* 4.3M vets and survivors receiving compensation and pensions.
* 2M veterans with active home loans, with 950 applications approved daily.
* 1.6M veterans and dependents receiving education and training benefits under the new post-9/11 GI Bill.
* 120,000 who receive final honors or burial in one of the VA's 131 cemeteries.

According to the budget proposed in February by the Obama Administration, the Army is expected to soon shrink to pre-WWII levels. There are also calls to retire hundreds of aircraft and warships. National Guard units are also expected to be downsized.

Like the post-draft Vietnam Era drawdown, advocates worry that soldiers will be discharged to the streets just short of vesting for military pensions. In New York State alone, 44,027 newly discharged veterans are expected to return within the next five years. If trends hold, upwards of half this number can be expected to return to the City of New York.

These brave men and women will be in need of services and benefits, and will be filing claims in an already overwhelmed VA administrative system. They will be seeking health care in an already overwhelmed VA medical system. They will also be seeking housing, education and most importantly, jobs, in a most challenging economic climate.

Former Lt. Governor Betsy McCaughey said it best in a recent NY Post editorial: "Veterans' demand for medical care exceeds the VA's capacity. Again and again, VA bureaucrats have responded to that problem by lying, gaming the electronic-monitoring system and making false promises to the public."

The looming question as to whether the VA is up to the task, and whether the President and the Congress are ready to meet the challenge is one that I shudder to consider.

***
Lee Covino is a US Army veteran. He became an advocate for veterans affairs as a peer counselor while attending the College of Staten Island on the GI Bill from 1973-1977. From 1980-1984, he worked as an intervention counselor for the VA's Vietnam Veterans Outreach Center in Brooklyn and Staten Island. In 1990, he was appointed to the Borough President's Cabinet, where he served as the Veterans Affairs Advisor and Director of Contracts & Procurement until his retirement in 2014. In May 2002, Covino was appointed to the City's Veterans Advisory Board by Mayor Michael Bloomberg. He was re-appointed to the board by the mayor in 2007 and in 2012.

]]>
webmaster@gothamgazette.com (Lee Covino) Tue, 01 Jul 2014 05:00:00 GMT http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/opinion/5134-va-ready-onslaught-returning-veterans-lee-covino
How To Get Your Street Name Changed In Five Easy Steps http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5133-five-steps-get-street-name-changed-cuny Malcolm X Blvd

The intersection of two honoric streets (Phil Whitehouse via Flickr)


This article is part of NYC Street Signs, a product of the NYCity News Service at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

Five Steps To A New York City Street Name Change:

1) The process of changing a street name begins with signatures. An individual hoping to change a street name needs signatures (online or in-person) and addresses from at least 75% of residents and/or business people on the specific block. For example, if the block has 153 units, a petition needs a minimum of 115 signatures of support to move forward.

2) After acquiring the necessary number of signatures, the next step is to bring the petition to the local community board's traffic and transportation committee, and to fill out the board's specific application (see an example here).

The committee takes roughly a month to look over an application to make sure it falls under the board's guidelines. If the the committee approves the application, it is brought before the entire community board for deliberation.

3) If the local community board approves the application, it then travels to city's legislative body: the New York City Council.

4) The City Council carries out evaluations of applications and potential street name honorees. A specific council member is also required to submit a detailed report on potential honorees. If any complications concerning a proposed name change arise, the council speaker's leadership team takes a final look. Twice a year, the City Council votes on street name changes.

5) After approval by the City Council, the mayor has the power, though it is rarely used, to veto a new street co-naming. After passage, the city's Department of Transportation will put up a new sign, usually within six months.

Note: this five step guide is an edited version of the illustrated original, which can be seen here.

NYCityNewsService logo

NYC Street Signs is a product of the NYCity News Service at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

See the full project here

]]>
webmaster@gothamgazette.com (Jake Becker) Mon, 30 Jun 2014 17:53:03 GMT http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5133-five-steps-get-street-name-changed-cuny
2014 Race Page Template June 2014 Accordion http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/component/content/article/86-elections/5137-2014-race-page-template-june-2014-accordion

Overview

Photo Currently Unavailable

Photo Currently Unavailable

Firstname Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)

Firstname Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)

Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)

Firstname Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)


Campaign Website
Facebook
Twitter - Campaign
Twitter - Individual

On the Issues

Endorsements

Record in Office

Currently:

Previous Work:

Education:


On the Issues

{mooblock=*Research Ongoing}

*Research ongoing

{/mooblock}


Endorsements

Organizations:

Individuals:


Record in Office

Committee Assignments:

Caucuses:

Notes:

Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)

Firstname Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)


Campaign Website
Facebook
Twitter - Campaign
Twitter - Individual

On the Issues

Endorsements

Record in Office

Currently:

Previous Work:

Education:


On the Issues

  • Research Ongoing

    More Research
  • Research Ongoing

    More Research
  • Research Ongoing

    More Research

*Research ongoing


Endorsements

Organizations:

Individuals:


Record in Office

Committee Assignments:

Caucuses:

Notes:

Candidates' statements taken from their respective websites and press releases, unless otherwise noted.

Notes:



For additions or corrections, please contact Talia Werber at twerber@gothamgazette.com

]]>
webmaster@gothamgazette.com (Administrator) Mon, 30 Jun 2014 05:00:00 GMT http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/component/content/article/86-elections/5137-2014-race-page-template-june-2014-accordion
NY State Senate District 31 http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/component/content/article/86-elections/5135-ny-state-senate-district-31

Overview

Espaillat

10489713_1437774646489986_3550157554896778622_n.jpg

Adriano Espaillat (D) Robert Jackson (D)

Espaillat (D)

Adriano Espaillat (D)


Facebook

On the Issues

Endorsements

Record in Office

Currently: New York State Senator for the 31st Senate District (2010-present)

Previous Work: New York State Assembly (D, WF – 72nd District) 1997-2010; Project Right Start (Director) 1994-1996; Washington Heights Victims Services Community Office (Director) 1992-1994; Community Planning Board 12 (Executive board member); 34th Precinct Community Council (President); Minority Program Development Chair (State Senate); New York County Democratic Committee (District Leader 72A)

Education: B.S. Political Science, Queens College, 1978; Graduate Degree in Public Administration, NYU


On the Issues

{mooblock=Economy }

"I will go and make sure that regulatory practices that are important to ensure that banks and the financial institutions don't engage in risky business that will keep the taxpayer on the hook, that those kinds of regulations are kept strong and that our economy can move forward."6

Proposes to make those under the poverty line "eligible for food stamps, medicaid, Section 8...the tax payer we have to subsidize these companies on their benefits packages for their workers."6

Supports minimum wage at $15.3

Supports subsidies for local initatives: "I look forward to the Kingsbridge Armory project, spurring [economic growth through the sports venue, bringing people into the community to spend dollars]."5

Supports the following proposals to aid small businesses:

  • "shift the empowerment zone model from the big box stores" by "taking the $3000 tax credit that is given to big box stores...and double it and give it to small businesses" so that small businesses get "a $6000 tax credit for every local job that they create."3
  • help reduce cost of business by reducing individual small business' electric bills.3
  • rent regulation via binding arbitration: "when a lease is up the small business owner will be able to before an arbiter, before the landlord, and they will decide together the cost of the rent based on market value."4

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Education }

"I would like to see a portfolio based assessment approach to learning while at the same time keeping very high standards."5

"At the core of our academic failure I think is lack of language proficiency in our city...for ELLs [English Language Learners] we must have immersion programs to ensure that they have the proficiency of the language as quickly as possible and then they'll be able to take [high state tests]."5

Will not consider privatization of public schools.1

"We need to increase funding for all education possibilities."1

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Foreign Policy }

Iraq: "I would like to see a multi-national UN-led peace-keeping force that will stabilize the country so that we can avoid the conflict we're seeing on the front page of the papers...it's horrendous what's happening in that part of the world in Iraq and we should not go at it alone, it should be a peace keeping force that will stay on the ground, stabilize the situation and see whether or not the country is ready to go back on track...and guarantee the safety of its citizens without the kind of slaughter and carnage we've been seeing on TV." The peace-keeping force "could include US troops, but it's not a war it's a peace keeping force, UN-led with several countries and allies across the world that want to see that that part of the region is stabilized."6

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Health }

"The Affordable Care Act begins to wrestle with [the] reality [that health care costs were ballooning]. The fact that the Affordable Care Act allows you to have your children, until the age of 27, in the plan that doesn't take into consideration any existing conditions [is highly valuable]."

Supports the following changes to the ACA and its implementation:

  • expanding coverage to "the undocumented [who] are not covered, those 12 million people will go to the emergency room somewhere and that was part of the problem before."5
  • "take care of dental hygiene and dental care, which is an important part of your physical health as well."5
  • "expand the number of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) in the district, so our community has access to medical providers who speak our languages, understand our cultures, and know how difficult it can be for low-income families to find the time to seek out care."

"...will work to adjust funding based on more appropriate geographic measures than statewide levels to ensure our district gets the assistance it needs."

"...will push to prioritize federal research, education and grant funding towards targeting low-income communities of color.

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Homeland Security }

"I'm terrified when my daughter has to take the subway to go to work."1

"We should be considering greater resources for the waterfront part of the city, for the infrastructure part of the city, for our water and subway tunnels."

"I don't think we are doing enough in terms of allocating resources for that purpose."

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Housing }

"Public investment should go towards low-income housing for vulnerable New Yorkers, not to billionaires living in luxury apartments."

"...property owners who have broken their commitment to providing tenants with safe conditions should be ineligible for government investment."

"...will fight for renewed funding to address mold and other unsafe conditions that NYCHA tenants are grappling with. He will continue to push for NYCHA reform measures to empower tenants and bring greater accountability to the agency."

"...expand the federal Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) to further benefit our community. By increasing the percentage of units in LIHTC-funded buildings reserved for households with income 50% or 60% below our area's median income, we can bring more affordable housing to vulnerable New Yorkers in need."

"Make sure that HUD and the federal governments comes back with a vigorous attitude that they had in the past investing in the immediate development of affordable housing."1

"The HUD block grant program is lower right now in terms of funding then it was when President Gerald Ford was in office."2

"I would like to propose that the 207th Street railyard be looked at as a potential site for major development of affordable housing and a tech center for young people.

"There is no question that unless the federal government steps in and becomes a full partner in developing new units of affordable housing we won't be able to [create and preserve affordable housing]....HUD must step in with dollars and plans...I believe in a 40/30/30 model where you have 40 percent market rate, 30 percent middle class rate for the teacher, the firefighter, and another 30 percent for affordable housing. And I think banks will finance those projects."5

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Government Accountability }

On 4/12/14 Senator Espaillat criticized Congressman Rangel for not opening a district office in the Bronx section his district, which he had promised to do upon reelection in 2012. Senator Espaillat's campaign manager released this statement: "Senator Adriano Espaillat knows the importance of unifying the District and will finally open a long overdue Bronx District Office when he becomes the next Congressmember for the 13th."

"We want to take money out of politics, the way to do it is to support campaign finance reform."1

"I will implement participatory budget, so you the people will determine what happens with the money that's coming from Washington"1

"I'm very much in support of participatory budgeting. ... We need participatory budgeting in the empowerment zone process."2

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Immigration }

Advocates fast-tracking family reunification.

"Deportation should be stopped immediately, 1000 people a day, this is a terrible situation that's ripping families apart."

"I will go directly to President Obama and say let's stop the deportations...I would also ask administratively for some initiative to take place so that family reunification is really expedited."5

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Infrastructure }

"[Infrastructure] is not just a jobs creation problem, it is a homeland security issue."1

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Military and Veterans Affairs }

Military Conscription: "I would advocate for a draft, I think that a draft is a great equalizer of the sons and daughters of rich folks, middle class folks, and poor folks and working class families who will be able to have the privilege and the honor to live in our country."6

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Policing and Criminal Justice }

"In New York State, we must pass common-sense gun safety measures like mandatory renewal requirements of firearm licenses; micro-stamping ammunition so criminals can be easier to track and deter; and enhanced scrutiny for mentally unstable individuals seeking guns.

"Of course, gun violence does not stop at state borders. The federal government must end its failure and pass legislation banning assault weapons once and for all. While progressive states like New York have relatively strong gun laws, the patchwork of laws around the country allowing guns to travel easily between states is clearly an underlying factor in this broken system." (State Senator's Press Release)

"We must totally revamp the criminal justice system."1

"I worked to to providing alternative incarceration services before I got into power. I'm talking alternative incarceration services for non violent crimes."1

"We should have specialized drug courts that would handle minimum mandatory sentences."1

"The Federal Government should adopt a form of the Rockefeller Drug Law reform that we are accomplishing in New York State."1

Supports increasing police presence in NYCHA housing and on dangerous streets.4

Proposes to prevent criminal activity in young people by providing them with technology training.4

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Technology}
Proposes the creation of a tech center at the Inwood Rail Yard that will provide young people with technology training and keep them away from crime.4

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Transportation}

Proposes to "modernize federal transportation formulas that unfairly favor highway appropriations at urban America's expense. Transportation funding formulas must be altered to support the transit, bicyclist, and pedestrian infrastructure driving urban growth throughout the country."

{/mooblock}


Endorsements

Organizations:

Individuals:


Record in Office

Adriano Espaillat currently serves as New York State Senator for the 31st Senate District, since 2010-present

NYS Senate Committee and Subcommittee assignments: Committee on Housing, Construction and Community Development (Ranking Member); Committee on Environmental Conservation; Committee on Codes; Committee on Finance; Committee on Higher Education; Committee on Development; Committee on Insurance; Judiciary Committee;

NYS Senate Caucuses: Puerto Rican/Latino Caucus (Chair); The New York State Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus.


* Photo from Espaillat's NYS Senate profile

Notes:

1. Congressional District 13 Candidate Debate #1

2. Congressional District 13 Candidate Debate #2

3. Congressional District 13 Candidate Debate #3, June 9, 2014, ABC.

4. Congressional District 13 Candidate Debate #4, June 11, NY1.

5. Congressional District 13 Candidate Debate #5, June 16, BronxNet.

6. The Brian Lehrer Show, WNYC, June 20, 2014.

Jackson (D)

10489713_1437774646489986_3550157554896778622_n.jpg

Robert Jackson (D)

Campaign Website
Facebook
Twitter

On the Issues

Endorsements

Record in Office

Currently:

Previous Work: NY City Council Member for Manhattan's 7th District; Candidate for Manhattan Borough President; President of the Parents' Association, Community School Board 6; Public Employees Federation

Education: SUNY New Paltz


On the Issues

{mooblock=Development}

"Was a leader in producing a community agreement to approve the Columbia University expansion that protected affordable housing."

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Economy}

Sponsored legislation aiming "to protect small businesses."

Helped "create a community manpower training program cited as a national model by the Clinton Global Initiative."

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Education}

"Founded the Campaign for Fiscal Equity which sued the State of New York for 'cheating' students out of proper funding and consequently, out of a sound education. Before the trial, in order to bring attention to his cause, Jackson walked 150 miles from NYC to Albany and as a result, was honored as NY1's 'New Yorker of the Year.'" Decide NYC

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Housing}

"We are made strong by our diversity ... We don't need more luxury high rises on the Upper West Side. We must preserve affordable housing so seniors can stay here, young people can start here and the middle class can thrive. These senior citizens must be protected and this sale must be stopped."

{/mooblock}

{mooblock=Policing}

Sponsored gun Buy Back Programs.

Advocated for "stronger state and federal [gun control] legislation."

{/mooblock}


Endorsements

Organizations: International Union of Operating Engineers Local 891, Broadway Democratic Club, Three Parks Independent Democrats, Park River Independent Democrats, Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1181

Individuals:


Record in Office

NYC Council Committee Assignments:

NYC Council Caucuses:

Notes:

Candidates' statements taken from their respective websites and press releases, unless otherwise noted.

Notes:



For additions or corrections, please contact Talia Werber at twerber@gothamgazette.com

]]>
webmaster@gothamgazette.com (Administrator) Mon, 30 Jun 2014 05:00:00 GMT http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/component/content/article/86-elections/5135-ny-state-senate-district-31
2014 Race Page Template June 2014 http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/component/content/article/86-elections/5136-2014-race-page-template-june-2014

Overview

Photo Currently Unavailable

Photo Currently Unavailable

Firstname Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)

Firstname Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)

Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)

Firstname Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)


Campaign Website
Facebook
Twitter - Campaign
Twitter - Individual

On the Issues

Endorsements

Record in Office

Currently:

Previous Work:

Education:


On the Issues

{mooblock=*Research Ongoing}

*Research ongoing

{/mooblock}


Endorsements

Organizations:

Individuals:


Record in Office

Committee Assignments:

Caucuses:

Notes:

Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)

Firstname Lastname (PARTY INITIAL)


Campaign Website
Facebook
Twitter - Campaign
Twitter - Individual

On the Issues

Endorsements

Record in Office

Currently:

Previous Work:

Education:


On the Issues

{mooblock=*Research Ongoing}

*Research ongoing

{/mooblock}


Endorsements

Organizations:

Individuals:


Record in Office

Committee Assignments:

Caucuses:

Notes:

Candidates' statements taken from their respective websites and press releases, unless otherwise noted.

Notes:



For additions or corrections, please contact Talia Werber at twerber@gothamgazette.com

]]>
webmaster@gothamgazette.com (Administrator) Mon, 30 Jun 2014 05:00:00 GMT http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/component/content/article/86-elections/5136-2014-race-page-template-june-2014
The Week Ahead in New York Politics, June 29 http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5132-week-ahead-new-york-politics-june-29 640px-New York City Hall

New York City Hall


What to look for this week, via the City and Albany:

And from Brazil, of course. On the heels of the United States Men's National Team's advancement into the knockout round of the 2014 World Cup - which saw Gov. Andrew Cuomo grant state employees an extra hour of lunchtime on Thursday for the U.S.-Germany match - the U.S. is back at it again on Tuesday at 4 p.m. EST versus Belgium. We already weren't expecting a lot to happen politically this week - it's a holiday week with July 4th on Friday and so much has been wrapped up over the last two weeks with the city budget deal, the end of session in Albany, the NY13 Democratic primary, and more.

Still, though, a few things to look for this week and beyond...

Many will be looking this week for further indication of what is afoot in terms of Albany politics and the changing landscape of control of the New York State Senate, including what role Gov. Cuomo will play in ensuring that Democrarts control the body, and therefore, both houses of the Legislature. New York Republicans are promising to take control of the Senate despite the announcement that the Independent Democratic Conference is breaking it's coalition with Senate Republicans to form one with Senate Democrats. Stay tuned - and tune into the state races of 2014: we have you covered, primary day is just over two months away (Sept. 9), election day in about four (Nov. 4). This week includes several relevant events - see below for details.

This week kicks off with an interesting transportation committee hearing at the City Council, an appearance by the Speaker on the Brian Lehrer Show, and more. Mayor Bill de Blasio starts his week delivering "remarks at the NYPD Graduation Ceremony in Manhattan" and attending "the retirement ceremony for Detective Bromm at the 78th Precinct in Brooklyn," according to his public schedule.

More on Monday's activity and the rest of the week below.

(And here's your link to the World Cup schedule, because we know it's pretty important to many of you for the week ahead)

A mostly non-fútbol run of the week in more detail:

New York City

On Monday
At the City Council on Monday morning at 10 a.m., the Committee on Transportation will consider a bill that would change rules regarding alternate side parking regulations, disallowing tickets for drivers who are sitting in their cars waiting for street sweeping and move them, and allowing drivers to park as soon as a street has been swept. It's the only hearing on the Council's schedule for the week.

Also at 10 a.m. on Monday morning, City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito will appear on the Brian Lehrer Show. Host and guest will surely touch on several topics, certain to include the Council's recent passage of a bill to create a municipal identification card program in New York.

At 11 a.m. on Monday, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer will hold a press conference on the steps of City Hall to unveil her office's report on arts education in the borough and to announce related grants and other measures Brewer's office has decided upon to address inequities or limitations in arts ed.

Tuesday
Tuesday afternoon New Yorkers will again pause all other activity to tune in for a United States World Cup match: 4 p.m. vs. Belgium. Win or go home.

On Tuesday evening, Congressman Joe Crowley, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, State Senator Mike Gianaris and others host a fund-raising reception in support of Leroy Comrie, current Deputy Queens BP and state Senate candidate. Comrie is challening indicted Sen. Malcolm Smith. The event will be in Long Island City.

Also on Tuesday evening, another Queens state Senate candidate has a fundraising event: former Comptroller John Liu (who is challenging IDC member Sen. Tony Avella in the Democratic primary) will have his second fund-raiser of his campaign, and according to the Liu camp, "this time hosted by legislators and John's soon-to-be colleagues who share his senatorial district in Northeast Queens."

Wednesday
According to previous reports, on Wednesday evening Mayor de Blasio is expected to headline a fundraising event of the New York State Democratic Senate Campaign Committee. The event promises to have an especially lively tone after last week's news of plans for the IDC to realign with mainline Senate Democrats.

Thursday
Nothing for you yet - and there's a good chance that doesn't change as people get an early start on the long weekend.

Friday
Friday is July 4, 2014. It is the 238th birthday of the United States and in New York City, the date that will see the return of fireworks celebrations to the East River, per the new mayor, who happens to be a Brooklynite and made this call back in April.

Enjoy the holiday and holiday weekend! And look for our next report on the week ahead in New York politics on July 6th. Send us anything you'd like to see included (email bmax@gothamgazette.com)!

***Sneak peak for the week ahead of this week ahead: on Tuesday, July 8th, our Ben Max is moderating an event focused on homelessness and homelessnes policy being put on by Greater NYC for Change and several partners. The event is called "After Dasani: Shining Light on the Invisible" and will include discussion featuring experts and advocates, as well as audience questions, of course. More info and RSVP here.***

***
Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? Email Gotham Gazette executive editor Ben Max any time: bmax@gothamgazette.com (use "For Week Ahead" as email subject if possible).

***
by Kristen Meriwether and Ben Max in New York City and David King in Albany
@GothamGazette

]]>
webmaster@gothamgazette.com (Kristen Meriwether, Ben Max & David King) Sun, 29 Jun 2014 05:00:00 GMT http://www.gothamgazette.com/index.php/government/5132-week-ahead-new-york-politics-june-29