Quantcast

Gotham Gazette

The Place for New York Policy and politics

Citizens Union

Gotham Votes 2013

Event Of The Day: Mayoral Forum On Food Systems


All of the Democratic candidates for mayor are expected to attend a forum on building and strengthening healthy, affordable and sustainable food systems in New York City.

Food Systems Network NYC, a group working toward universal access to nourishing, affordable food is hosting the event along with 76 other organizations. The event is scheduled to start at 6 p.m, doors will open at 5 p.m.

The host has confirmed Democrats Anthony Weiner, Christine Quinn, Bill Thompson, Bill de Blasio, John Liu and Sal Albanese. Republican John Catsimatidis will also be attending.

The event is scheduled to take place at the Tishman Auditorium located at 66 W. 12th St., Manhattan. Registration to attend the event is closed, but there will be livestream of the forum here.

For more mayoral forums and other events visit Gotham Gazette’s calendar.

— Daniel Stein-Sayles

Mayor's Office


After a primary election that was sometimes bizarre and overly wonky, the mayoral race has come down to two major candidates: Democrat Bill de Blasio and Republican Joe Lhota. So far, de Blasio and Lhota have declared competing visions of the city: the former continuing his mantra that the city has become divided because of increasing income inequality, while Lhota argues that he is the best candidate to continue the successful trajectory of the metropolis under Michael Bloomberg's administration.

There are, of course, multiple third-party candidates, including top independents Adolfo Carrión and tech entrepreneur Jack Hidary. Comedian-turned-candidate Randi Credico and preacher Erick Salgado are also make return appearances in the general election.

Read more: Mayor's Office

Public Advocate


The office currently held by surging Democratic mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio is widely considered the least powerful on a citywide level. But the public advocate is also next in line to be mayor. Even it's position in the line of succession betrays the actual relevance that the office plays in the city's policy making. While a public advocate certainly has some appointment powers and can introduce legislation — not vote — to the Council, it has no independently funded budget.

Read more: Public Advocate

City Comptroller


The comptroller is the city's chief financial officer. Current officeholder John Liu unsuccessfully ran for the Democratic nomination for mayor and will be leaving the job at the end of this year. After a Democratic primary between former Gov. Elliot Spitzer and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer caused a stir in the 2013 elections, attention now turns to the general eleciton. Stringer eked out a win to get the Democratic nod, but now faces a challenge in businessman and GOP candidate John Burnett.

Read more: City Comptroller

Staten Island Borough President


The office of borough president was created at the time of the consolidation of Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island into the City of Greater New York in 1898. The idea of borough president, the charter said, was to preserve "local pride and affection." But the presidents' heyday drew to an end in 1989 when the Board of Estimate was eliminated and their powers diminished. Today, the borough presidents make a few appointments, chair the borough boards, and oversee the delivery of services in their boroughs. They can also propose legislation in City Council. (Adapted from "Being Borough President," Gotham Gazette, 2005)

Read more: Staten Island Borough President

Manhattan Borough President


The office of borough president was created at the time of the consolidation of Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island into the City of Greater New York in 1898. The idea of borough president, the charter said, was to preserve "local pride and affection." But the presidents' heyday drew to an end in 1989 when the Board of Estimate was eliminated and their powers diminished. Today, the borough presidents make a few appointments, chair the borough boards, and oversee the delivery of services in their boroughs. They can also propose legislation in City Council. (Adapted from "Being Borough President," Gotham Gazette, 2005)

Read more: Manhattan Borough President

Brooklyn Borough President


The office of borough president was created at the time of the consolidation of Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island into the City of Greater New York in 1898. The idea of borough president, the charter said, was to preserve "local pride and affection." But the presidents' heyday drew to an end in 1989 when the Board of Estimate was eliminated and their powers diminished. Today, the borough presidents make a few appointments, chair the borough boards, and oversee the delivery of services in their boroughs. They can also propose legislation in City Council. (Adapted from "Being Borough President," Gotham Gazette, 2005)

Read more: Brooklyn Borough President



Print Friendly and PDF

Editor's Choice


Gotham Gazette: Fixing City's 'Non-Functioning' Board of Elections Relies on State Fixing City's 'Non-Functioning' Board of Elections Relies on State Gotham Gazette: De Blasio Continues Deliberative Approach to Appointments De Blasio Continues Deliberative Approach to Appointments Gotham Gazette: Despite Expectations, Design-Build for New York City Not Approved in Albany Despite Expectations, Design-Build for New York City Not Approved in Albany Gotham Gazette: De Blasio and The Complications of Vetting Campaign Donors De Blasio and The Complications of Vetting Campaign Donors


Comments
Comment(s)

The comments section is provided as a free service to our readers. Gotham Gazette's editors reserve the right to delete any comments. Some reasons why comments might get deleted: inappropriate or offensive content, off-topic remarks or spam.