Quantcast

Gotham Gazette

The Place for New York Policy and politics

Citizens Union

The Eye-Opener

Marist #NYC2013 Poll: Quinn Still Leads, Weiner Not Far Behind

Posted by on
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Print
  • PDF

Former Congressman Anthony Weiner's entry into the mayoral race ate into City Council Speaker Christine Quinn's lead among likely Democratic voters, a new poll shows.

A Marist College poll released today showed that despite a 4 percentage point drop from April, Quinn still has a command across the Democratic spectrum: liberals, conservatives and moderates. She also came out in front across most of the boroughs, save for Brooklyn. However, where Quinn falls short is in loyalty among voters, proving that the race is still hers to lose.

Of those who said that they support Quinn, almost three out of four Democratic respondents said that they somewhat support her or might vote differently come the September primary. That's good news to the whole slate of candidates, potentially even more so for Weiner.

Weiner actually enjoyed the highest bump after he announced his candidacy last week, up 4 percentage points to 19 from his 15 percent in April. Despite Quinn's drop in the poll to 24 percent from last month's 26 percent, he still trailed the speaker by five points.

Weiner did have a lead on Quinn in his home borough of Brooklyn, although Public Advocate Bill de Blasio isn't too far behind. Fresh off a spate of labor endorsements, De Blasio inched up 1 percentage point among Democrats citywide. He also barely edges out former Comptroller Bill Thompson — who remains steady at 11 percent.

Meanwhile, current Comptroller John Liu took a sizable tumble into the single digits: 8 percent from his earlier 12 percent. The pack is rounded off with former Councilman Sal Albanese and the conservative Rev. Eric Salgado receiving 1 percent or less.

The overall spread lines up pretty well with last week's Quinnipiac poll, which also showed Quinn and Weiner leading the race.

It's not all bad news for the candidates lagging in the race, though. Of the 1,001 New Yorkers polled by Marist, 23 percent haven't quite made up their minds yet.

  • No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment

Leave your comment

Guest Wednesday, 26 November 2014