GOTHAM GAZETTE: SEARCHLIGHT: BALLOT PROPOSALS JUMP TO YOUR DISTRICT
 
 


2003 New York City Ballot Proposals

Following are the texts of five questions that will be put before New York City voters on November 4, 2003

1. PROPOSAL ONE, AN AMENDMENT

Exclusion of Indebtedness Contracted for Sewage Facilities

The proposed amendment to Article 8, section 5 of the Constitution would extend for ten years, until January 1, 2014, the authority of counties, cities, towns and villages to exclude from their constitutional debt limits indebtedness contracted for the construction or reconstruction of sewage facilities. Shall the proposed amendment be approved?

2. PROPOSAL NUMBER TWO, AN AMENDMENT

Elimination of Small City School Districts from Constitutional Debt Limitations

The proposed amendment to Article 8, section 4 of the Constitution would eliminate school districts that are coterminous with, or partly within, or wholly within a city having less than one hundred twenty-five thousand inhabitants, from the entities subject to a general constitutional debt limitation. Shall the proposed amendment be approved?

3. PROPOSAL NUMBER THREE, A QUESTION - CITY ELECTIONS

This proposal would amend the City Charter to establish a new system of city elections for the offices of mayor, public advocate, comptroller, borough president, and council member. The September primary election would be open to all voters and all candidates, regardless of party membership or independent status.

The top two vote-getters would compete in the November general election. In both elections, candidates could indicate their party membership or independent status on the ballot. Candidates participating in the voluntary campaign finance program, which provides public campaign funding, could not accept contributions from political parties or party committees. The new system would replace the current system of political party nominations through primary elections in which only party members may vote. The changes would take effect after the 2005 citywide election. Shall this proposal be adopted?

4. PROPOSAL NUMBER FOUR, A QUESTION - CITY PURCHASING

This proposal would amend the City Charter to: remove from the charter detailed requirements for specific purchasing methods; increase qualifications for city purchasing officials; provide for citywide coordination to enhance opportunities for small businesses and minority and women-owned businesses; reduce required procedures for security-related contracts; reduce impact on city contractors, including not-for-profit organizations, of delays in contracting and payment; and consolidate audit requirements for city contractors. Shall this proposal be adopted?

5. PROPOSAL NUMBER FIVE, A QUESTION - GOVERNMENT ADMINISTRATION

This proposal would amend the City Charter to: authorize the mayor to issue rules governing the professional conduct of administrative law judges and hearing officers in the city's administrative tribunals, require the coordination of such tribunals, and expand the authority of the administrative tribunal of the Department of Consumer Affairs to hear all matters within the agency's jurisdiction; enhance the enforcement authority of the Conflicts of Interest Board by allowing increased penalties for violations of the city's ethics laws; replace the current 16-member Voter Assistance Commission with a seven-member panel, which would include the public advocate, an appointee of the council speaker, and five appointees (one from each borough) of the mayor, with Council advice and consent.

The coordinator of voter assistance would be appointed by the mayor, with Council advice and consent, instead of by the commission; and require annual publication only of the mayor's management report. The preliminary mayor's management report would no longer be required. Shall this proposal be adopted?