GOTHAM GAZETTE: SEARCHLIGHT 2002: Voting Records - Tech

2002 CITY COUNCIL LEGISLATION BY TOPIC

Arts
Children
Civil Rights
Crime
Education
Environment
Finance
Health
Housing
Immigrants
Land Use
Law
Parks
Social Services
Tech
Transportation
Voting
Waterfront

If there is something you can not find or think a specific bill should be added, send us an email. The voting records will be updated every two weeks as information is made available.

VOTING RECORDS: TECH

Read more about technology on Gotham Gazette.

Click here for complete reports from the council committee in this topic

ON THIS PAGE:
LAWS PASSED IN 2003
LAWS PASSED IN 2002
BILLS PENDING


LAWS PASSED IN 2003

POSTING GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS ONLINE (Intro 119-A)
This law requires the Department of Records and Information Services (DORIS) to post all official publications from city agencies on its web site. This law applies to the mayor, all city agencies, the comptroller, the public advocate, and the City Council.

Sponsoring Members:
By Council Members Brewer, Avella, DeBlasio, Fidler, Jackson, Lopez, Monserrate, Moskowitz, Perkins, Reyna, Sears and Felder; also Council Members Addabbo and Sanders

Council Vote:
48 for, 0 against, 1 absent
Approved by council January 29, 2003
Signed by mayor February 18, 2003

Absent:
Tracy Boyland

---

BANNING CELL PHONES AT PUBLIC PERFORMANCES (Intro 257-A)
This law restricts the use of cell phones in places of public performances. Violators will now face a $50 fine and eviction from the venue for talking on, listening to or having a cell phone ring at movie theaters, plays, musicals, museums, or libraries. The mayor vetoed the law, saying it was not enforceable. The council overrode the mayo's veto.

Sponsoring Members:
By Council Members Reed, Addabbo, Brewer, Comrie, DeBlasio, Foster, Gioia, Gerson, Koppell, Martinez, Nelson, Perkins, Provenzano, Quinn, Recchia, Sears, Serrano, Vann, Weprin, Boyland and Oddo.

Council Vote:
Approved by council December 18, 2002
40 for, 9 against, 2 abstain
Vetoed by mayor January 13, 2003
Overridden by council February 12, 2003
38 for, 5 against, 2 abstain, 4 absent

Yes:
Joseph Addabbo, Jr., Tony Avella, Maria Baez, Charles Barron, Tracy Boyland, Gale Brewer, Yvette Clarke, Leroy Comrie, Bill DeBlasio, Lewis Fidler, James Gennaro, Alan Gerson, Eric Gioia, Sarah Gonzalez, Robert Jackson, Melinda Katz, G. Oliver Koppell, Margarita Lopez, Miguel Martinez, Michael McMahon, Gifford Miller, Michael Nelson, James Oddo, Bill Perkins, Madeline Provenzano, Christine Quinn, Domenic Recchia, Philip Reed, Diana Reyna, Joel Rivera, James Sanders, Larry Seabrook, Helen Sears, Jose Serrano, Kendall Stewart, Albert Vann, David Weprin, David Yassky.

No:
James E. Davis, Erik Martin Dilan, Simcha Felder, Allan Jennings, John Liu.

Abstain:
Andrew Lanza, Hiram Monserrate

Absent:
Helen Foster, Dennis Gallagher, Eva Moskowitz, Peter Vallone, Jr.




LAWS PASSED IN 2002

CELL PHONE SURCHARGE (Intro 218)
As part of the 2003 city budget, this legislation adds a tax of 30 cents a month to New Yorkers' cell phone bills.

Sponsoring Members:
By Councilmembers David Weprin, Bill DeBlasio and Ruben Diaz (by request of the mayor)

Council Vote:
47 for, 3 against, 0 abstaining Passed by council June 21, 2002 Signed by mayor July 10, 2002

No:
Dennis Gallagher, Martin Golden, Andrew Lanza

Absent:
Eva Moskowitz

---

911 TELEPHONE FEE (Intro 219)
This legislation increases the monthly fee that funds 911 emergency phone service from $.35 to $1 a month.

Sponsoring Members:
Council members David Weprin, Bill DeBlasio, Ruben Diaz and Allan Jennings (by request of the mayor).

Council Vote:
for, 3 against, 0 abstaining
Passed by council June 21, 2002
Signed by mayor July 10, 2002

No:
Dennis Gallagher, Martin Golden, Andrew Lanza

Absent:
Eva Moskowitz




BILLS PENDING

CAR ALARMS MAY BE INSTALLED ONLY BY MANUFACTURER (Intro 194)
This bill aims to curtail noisy car alarms by making it illegal to buy, sell, or install your own car alarm. Only licensed installers would be exempt.

Sponsoring Members:
Council members John Liu, Helen Foster, Alan Gerson, Miguel Martinez, Eva Moskowitz and Michael Nelson; also Councilmember Madeline Provenzano

Status and history of this bill

---

CELL PHONES FOR SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS (INTRO 16)
This bill would require either two-way radios or cellular phones on all school buses as a safety precaution.

Sponsoring Members:
By council members Michael Nelson, Martin Golden, Tony Avella, Leroy Comrie, James Davis, Alan Gerson,Allan Jennings, Michael McMahon, Joel Rivera, Peter Vallone Jr., David Weprin, Dennis Gallagher, Andrew Lanza and James Oddo; also council members Joseph Addabbo Jr., Maria Baez, Eric Dilan, Eric Gioia, Robert Jackson, Oliver Koppell and Kendall Stewart.

Status and history of this bill

---

ELECTRONIC DEATH CERTIFICIATES (Intro 198)
Currently, the Department of Heath uses a paper-based death registration system for filing certified copies of some 63,000 death certificates each year. This bill would require the department to create an electronic death registration system which employs an internet-technology in an effort to save money and make the process more efficient.

Sponsoring Members:
By The Speaker (Council Member Miller) and Council Members Brewer, Quinn, Avella, Clarke, Katz, Koppell, Lopez, Martinez, Monserrate, Moskowitz, Nelson, Reyna, Sears, Stewart and Weprin

Status and history of this bill





HOW A BILL BECOMES A LAW IN NEW YORK CITY

When a bill (called an "Intro" in the City Council) is introduced, it is sent to one of 27 council committees for consideration. The chair of the committee decides whether or not to hold a hearing on the measure; at a hearing, the council listens to debate and testimony. The chair then can call for a vote on the measure. A majority of the committee members must vote in favor of an Intro for it to pass. If the chair chooses not hold a hearing or to not call a vote, the bill can sit indefinitely with no action taken.

Once a bill passes out of committee, it is sent to the full council. If passed by a majority (at least 26 of the 51 council members), the bill is sent to the mayor, who can also hold a public hearing. The mayor then must choose to sign or veto the bill. If the mayor signs the bill, it becomes a local law. If the mayor vetoes the bill, he or she must return it to the council at the next scheduled council meeting. The City Council has 30 days to override the mayoral veto by a two-thirds majority. In this event, the bill becomes a local law.

If the mayor does not sign or veto a bill within 30 days after receiving it from the council, it is considered approved.