Campaign Trail Archives
GOTHAM GAZETTE: SEARCHLIGHT ON CAMPAIGN 2001: CAMPAIGN TRAIL ARCHIVES

Learn About
Your District

Click on the pull-down menu and select your district



Campaign Tangle

The Campaign Tangle Begins

 


Archives

Recent Feature Stories:
The Nod of the Bosses... Scramble for the City Council... Basic Training for Council Recruits... How They Stack up on Term Limit... Dynasties... The Speech that Saved Term Limits...

 


What is Searchlight on Campaign 2001?
Searchlight on Campaign 2001 is a guide to the political races in what many are calling New York City's most significant campaign season in modern history.

What is so significant about it?
For the first time in memory, most political offices in the city will be wide open to people who have neither money nor connections.

Why will the races be so open?
There are two reasons. This year, a new law goes into effect that limits the terms of New York City elected officials, forcing the mass retirement of most incumbents in the city - including the mayor, the comptroller, the public advocate, four of the five borough presidents, and 36 of the 51 members of the City Council. At the same time, a new campaign finance law kicks in, which allows any candidate who agrees to certain restrictions to collect four dollars of matching funds for every dollar they raise.

What does this have to do with this site?
As a public service, Searchlight on Campaign 2001 has a separate page for each race, including all the races for City Council, that not only sorts out the candidates -- many of them new and unfamiliar -- but also offers an opportunity to learn about the issues, and the districts themselves.

Who is behind Searchlight on Campaign 2001?
Searchlight on Campaign 2001 is a project of Gotham Gazette, a non-profit, non-partisan, non-ideological (but non-boring) web site about New York City news, policy and politics published by Citizens Union Foundation, part of the oldest and largest good-government group in the city (founded in 1897).

What's wrong with the way the regular press covers the races?
That is for you to decide. And one of our regular features, Campaign Trail, helps you to decide. Campaign Trail provides succinct summaries and links to campaign articles in the commercial press.

Who are we?
Masthead

 

November Trail

December Campaign Trail

11/30
Mayor-elect Mike Bloomberg yesterday pledged to name his key staffers within two weeks and said most would have government experience. "You don't need more than one person as a total outsider. I fill the bill for a total outsider." One of the names that has surfaced for a deputy mayor or commissioner slot (perhaps head of the Community Assistance Unit) is Assemblyman John Ravitz. Ravitz, in the Assembly since 1990, had dropped out the Republican primary for mayor after Bloomberg entered it. (New York Post)

Bloomberg announced that he had appointed yet another large group, made up mostly of elected officials, who he said would advise him on practical issues in government. The group, which includes several lawmakers and Borough President Guy V. Molinari of Staten Island, will not formally guide him on appointments, he said, but rather advise him on how to work with the State Legislature and Washington. "There is a lot of knowledge here and I want to take advantage of it," he said. (New York Times)

Comptroller Alan Hevesi, 61, plans to make a bid for the state equivalent of his current city job in the wake of his failed try for mayor, his top political strategist Hank Morris said yesterday. (New York Post)

Contrary to repeated denials, Mark Green's mayoral campaign distributed the controversial flyers linking the Rev. Al Sharpton to the candidacy of Fernando Ferrer, sources told the Daily News. (Daily News)

11/29
Who will stay and who will go? The jockeying for posts in the Bloomberg administration continues. The Daily News today lists four top Giuliani administration officials who will probably not stay on after January: They are Administration for Children's Services Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta, who has rejected Mayor-elect Bloomberg's offer to stay; budget director Adam Barsky, Consumer Affairs Commissioner Jane Steiner Hoffman and Acting Buildings Commissioner Ron Livian. Parks Commissioner Henry Stern is also thought to be on his way out. On the other hand, Transportation Commissioner Iris Weinshall is considered likely to remain in her post. (Daily News)

Joel Miele, the current commissioner of the Department of Environmental Protection, is seeking to keep his job in the Bloomberg administration. Environmental groups are mounting an effort to block the appointment of Miele who, they charge, has not adequately protected the city's watershed. They also dislike his managerial style. Bloomberg aides would not comment on whether he was likely to keep Miele, but Crain's New York Business has identified Miele as one of the commissioners most likely to survive the transition. Robert F Kennedy, Jr., of the Riverkeeper environmental group said, "The reappointment of Commissioner Miele would be a declaration of war by Mayor Bloomberg upon New York's environmental community." (New York Observer)

Many other high level officials in the Giuliani administration would like to hold on to their jobs and are perplexed that they have not heard from Michael Bloomberg or his aides. Bloomberg has made it clear that people in the current administration would not have the inside track for a job in his, although he has said he would welcome resumes from them. (New York Times)

A group of newly elected City Council members is sponsoring a public debate for candidates for the post of City Council speaker. The speaker is chosen by members of council and normally campaigning for it goes on behind closed doors. The debate will take place Wednesday, although the location has yet to be determined. (New York Post)

11/28
Mayor Rudolph Giuliani ripped into the teachers' union yesterday, accusing it of risking grave damage to the city for continuing to seek a 22 percent wage increase even after the city's budget has plunged into deficit following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. In response, Randi Weingarten, president of the United Federation of Teachers, accused Mr. Giuliani of exploiting the attacks to avoid dealing with the call for higher wages. (New York Times)

Salsa king Willie Colon, who made a strong showing in the race for public advocate, has been "talking seriously" to Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg about joining the new administration, Colon told The Post yesterday. Colon, whose star-power endorsement helped Bloomberg snag a big chunk of the Latino vote, said he has not been offered a specific post. But he said he is "seriously considering" moving from canciones - songs - to City Hall and is mulling a future run for office. Bloomberg spokesman Jerry Russo would not comment on a possible Colon appointment. (New York Post)

11/27
Mayor Rudy Giuliani said yesterday that he expects a large number of his second- and third-level administrators to keep their jobs in the Bloomberg administration. "Obviously there's a lot of talented people in the Giuliani administration, and this transition team will be looking at them," agreed Bloomberg spokesman Ed Skyler. The mayor gets to appoint about 50 agency heads. There are as many as 3,000 who serve at his pleasure. (NY Post)

In the race for the Speaker of the City Council, two front-runners - Angel Rodriguez of Brooklyn and Gifford Miller of Manhattan - say they are nearing the magic number of 26 votes from his colleagues. Backers of Rodriguez, 44, said he has 18 firm votes nailed down, including his own and 10 others in the incoming Brooklyn delegation. But supporters of Miller, 32, insisted Rodriguez has stalled and that the race could go either way. "The pendulum shifts almost daily," said Councilman-elect Joseph Addabbo of Queens. "I've spoken to Democratic leaders and many of my colleagues, and nothing right now is written in stone." (Daily News)

The top ten things Rudy Giuliani will miss about being mayor, according to his appearance on the David Letterman Show last night:

10. If I feel like sleeping in, I call a citywide snow emergency.
9. Naming a street after someone is a great, inexpensive Christmas gift.
8. If I want tickets to "The Producers," I just pick up the phone - and four or five months later I get tickets to "The Producers."
7. The look on people's faces when they realize the key to the city doesn't open a damn thing.
6. I'm double-parked right now - who's gonna tow me?
5. That smell in the subway. ... Call me crazy, but I've grown to love it.
4. When someone catches a gator in Central Park, guess who gets to keep it?
3. Street vendors sell me counterfeit DVDs half-price.
2. The Yankees winning all those World Series? That was my idea.
1. The daily call from Letterman begging me to reopen strip clubs.

11/26
A profile of Michael Bloomberg concludes that he is a man with two distinct sides, one jocular, brash and egocentric, the other thoughtful, earnest and selfless. "For every story about Mr. Bloomberg as the pushy center of his universe," the article says, "there is one about Mr. Bloomberg as the unsung purveyor of good deeds 1*2 the good friend, the responsive boss, the generous philanthropist and the loving son and father." (New York Times)

Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg and about a half dozen elected officials will fly on Bloomberg's private jet today to Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. Bloomberg is expected to visit with families of those killed on American Airlines Flight 587, which crashed in Belle Harbor two weeks ago, and to meet with the Dominican president and the governor of Puerto Rico. (Newsday)

Even though virtually no unions endorsed him in his bid for mayor, Michael Bloomberg is reaching out to New York unions. He has held high-profile meetings with Randi Weingarten, head of the teachers union, and Lee Saunders, the top official in District Council 37 which represents 125,000 municipal workers. Bloomberg also held a private breakfast meeting with representatives from the police and fire unions and appointed three union leaders to his transition team. (Daily News)

Outgoing City Council Speaker, and unsuccessful mayoral candidate, Peter Vallone said in an interview that he will remain politically active after he leaves office in January. Vallone said he will raise money for a political action committee called VPAC that could focus on trying to end term limits and on improving schools in the city. He warned new council members that they must cooperate on the city budget or face having the city's finances taken over by a state board. (Newsday)

11/25
Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg will continue giving to charity after he becomes mayor and said he intends to avoid conflicts of interest by delegating decisions on his charitable donations to an independent panel. Bloomberg, a billionaire, gives about $100 million a year to charity. (Daily News)

11/24
Michael Bloomberg is planning a modest inauguration when he takes the oath of office as New York City mayor on New Year£s Day. Although the mayor-elect is known to enjoy lavish parties, this one will be low-key, largely because of the World Trade Center tragedy and the November 12 crash of American Airlines Flight 587 in the Rockaways. (Daily News)

11/22
Edward Skyler will become the youngest - and, perhaps, tallest - mayoral press secretary in recent memory. Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg announced yesterday that his 28-year-old campaign spokesman, 6'4, will serve as his press secretary after he takes office on January 1. Skyler worked in the Parks Department for four years before joining Mayor Giuliani's press office in 1999. In the summer of 2000, he left the city for Bloomberg LP's corporate communications office, and then joined Bloomberg's campaign. (Daily News)

Anonymous fliers are being distributed attacking Brooklyn Councilman Angel Rodriguez, one of the leading contenders for the powerful post being vacated at the end of the year by Peter Vallone. Sources said the fliers had been circulating among members of the Working Families Party and others close to another speaker candidate - Gifford Miller (D-Manhattan). Miller said he knew nothing of the fliers, but added it was appropriate every candidate's records be examined. (New York Post)

11/21
Mayor Giuliani has decided he doesn't want a role on the city-state commission that will oversee downtown redevelopment, sources told The Post yesterday. Giuliani will still name three people to the newly created panel, which will also feature six appointees picked by Gov. Pataki - one of whom could have been the mayor. (NY Post)

Responding to the World Trade Center attacks, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority has tapped Louis Anemone, the police department's former top uniformed officer, to head a newly created position of Director of Security, the MTA announced yesterday. (Newsday)

Outgoing City Council Speaker Peter Vallone is hoping to raise as much as $1 million in a highly unusual $5,000-a-ticket fund-raiser just two weeks before leaving office. Aides said the money would go toward establishing the "Vallone Political Action Committee," which would push to overturn term limits, eliminate the Board of Education, and retain the public campaign-finance program. (NY Post)

11/20
Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg named 56 people to his transition team yesterday. The group includes two prominent labor leaders, business executives, people with ties to the Giuliani administration and New Yorkers from a variety of other fields. (New York Times)

A complete list of transition team members (New York Times)

11/19
Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg will name a team of about 50 people from business, academia and government to help him pull off a "seamless" shift in government, according to Nathan Leventhal, Bloomberg's transition chairman. Although Leventhal did not say who would be on the panel, he did make it clear that anyone who served on the team would not be eligible for a government post. (Daily News)

11/18
Unless the company that bears the name of Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg is sold, the city's Conflicts of Interest Board may soon confront the stickiest conflict of interest problems ever to come before a government body. (Daily News)

Michael Bloomberg may be the richest person ever to hold office in this country, surpassing the late Governor Nelson Rockefeller and the Kennedys. (Daily News)

Even though Michael Bloomberg has complied with city financial disclosure laws, New Yorkers really do not know just how rich their new mayor is. That is because the laws are designed to reveal potential conflicts of interest, not to open a politician£s checkbook to the view of the world. (Daily News)

Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg will remain on as chairman of the board of Johns Hopkins University but will step down from boards of 19 other non -profits. (New York Post)

11/17
Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg and Schools Chancellor Harold Levy met for almost two hours but neither would say much about what transpired during their discussions. Bloomberg said they did not talk about whether Levy would stay on as chancellor, focusing instead on the schools. Levy's contract expires in June. He has not said whether he wants an extension, and Bloomberg has not said whether he would like him to remain. (New York Times)

After a two hour meeting with Schools Chancellor Harold Levy, Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg refused to say he would keep Levy in his post. "I said during the campaign I would certainly consider him if he wanted to stay, and would consider others," Bloomberg said several hours after his lunch date with Levy. (Daily News)

Calling themselves the "Fresh Democracy Council," 17 newly elected members of the City Council have banded together in an effort to strip some power from the office of City Council speaker and make the City Council operate more like the U.S. Congress. Council members will choose a new speaker in January. (New York Post)

11/16
Mayor-elect Michael R. Bloomberg has invited Schools Chancellor Harold O. Levy for a lunch today in what could be the first step toward deciding Mr. Levy's future as the head of what is by far the city's largest agency. The meeting comes at a time when the chancellor's support has suffered some major setbacks. The Board of Education president, Ninfa Segarra, has been hostile to Mr. Levy in recent months, and three of the six other members have often echoed her antagonism. And Randi Weingarten, the teachers' union president who was once Mr. Levy's strongest mainstay, has indicated increasing disenchantment. Just yesterday, she complained at a City Council meeting that there had been no educational movement forward in the school system since the Sept. 11 attack. (New York Times)

11/15
Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg will go to Washington today for a series of high-level meetings with administration and congressional officials. Bloomberg, a Democrat who became a Republican to run for mayor, has said his membership in the GOP will be an asset in dealing with the Bush administration. However, he differs with most Republicans in Washington on an array of issues. (Daily News)

How will Bloomberg, the media company, cover Bloomberg, the mayor? The news service managed to avoid any coverage of the boss during his campaign but that will be impossible now that he is mayor. So, says editor in chief Matt Winkler, the company may turn to an ombudsman to independently analyze its coverage. (New York Observer)

11/14
About three weeks ago, Raymond Kelly, who was officially introduced by Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg as the next police commissioner of New York, said he and his wife, Veronica, stood on the roof of a building in Battery Park City, where they live. For the first time, they took in the breadth of the destruction. Their neighborhood was in ruins.Yesterday, in making the announcement that Mr. Kelly will take the job, Mr. Bloomberg said that he would rely not only on Mr. Kelly's service in New York, but also his eight years in federal law enforcement positions in Washington. "His experience is exactly what we need for police commissioner right now," he said. "I think the police commissioner is perhaps the most important appointment I will make." (New York Times)

11/13
New York Police Department First Deputy Comissioner Joseph Dunne, twice passed over for police commissioner, will retire Jan. 1, the day Ray Kelly is expected to return to run the department. (New York Post)

Nearly six hours after an American Airlines jet plunged into a Queens neighborhood, with Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Governor George Pataki once again taking center stage in a tragedy, Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg emerged from his midtown offices and spoke briefly with reporters before heading out to meet victims' families. Later in the evening, he attended a vigil in Washington Heights. "We're obviously experiencing another great tragedy here, and the hearts of all New Yorkers go out to the families of those that were lost," he said.(Daily News)

11/12
Raymond W. Kelly, who was New York City's 37th police commissioner, under Mayor David N. Dinkins, has accepted Mayor-elect Michael R. Bloomberg's offer to return to 1 Police Plaza as the city's 41st police commissioner, two people familiar with the transition plan said yesterday. (NY Times)

New York is "alive and well and open for business!" Mike Bloomberg boomed in his reedy Boston accent after his improbable election last week as the city' s 108th mayor. It was a strong and reassuring line from the billionaire bon vivant, who got his job the New York way-he bought it, with a staggering $70 million of his own money. But in truth, like an all-night Korean grocery, the city had never been closed in the first place, not even on September 11. And short of an atom bomb, it never will. (Newsweek)

Who can we expect to see in City Hall in two months? For starters, there's Patti Harris and Kevin Sheekey. These two trusted campaign advisers -- the pair he thanked in his Election Night speech -- are veteran Democrats who deliberately attracted minimal personal attention, making them the most important political players in New York you've never heard of. Harris, the well-connected, graciously steely former Koch arts-staff member who disburses Bloomberg's charitable millions, has been the office perfectionist who carefully guards his image, from lining up meetings to working debate prep to even approving brochure photos. Sheekey, the boyishly smooth former Moynihan strategist hired by Bloomberg several years ago to introduce him around Washington, was nicknamed "the invisible man" by campaign staff for his role as the candidate's quiet, ever-present shadow on the hustings. "Kevin and Patti were Mike's eyes and ears," says Jonathan Capehart, former Daily News editorial writer who was a Bloomberg policy adviser and speechwriter. "Nothing happened on the campaign without them signing off." Now Harris is rumored to be in line for a deputy mayor's job, and Sheekey is likely to get an equally prominent post. (New York Magazine)

"Memo" to the mayor-elect from experts giving advice about transportation, housing, education, race relations and municipal labor unions. (NY Times)

Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg has named Nathan Leventhal as his transition chairman. Mr. Leventhal, who served as president of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts from 1984 to 2000, is no stranger to city government. After service in the Pentagon, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the office of Sen. Ted Kennedy, he served as chief of staff to Mayor John Lindsay, deputy mayor to Mayor Ed Koch, and chairman of Mayor David Dinkins' transition committee. (Crain's NY Business)

Michael Bloomberg will take longer and be more deliberate in selecting his City Hall team than most incoming mayors, officials close to the Republican mayor-elect say. But already, lists are emerging of Giuliani administration officials who will stay at least temporarily, led by Deputy Mayor Joe Lhota, and those who could stay permanently if they wish. In addition, many of the mayor-elect's close advisers are likely to assume key positions. The mayor-elect's closest aide is Patti Harris, a former Koch administration official who runs Mr. Bloomberg's corporate philanthropic operations. She was a strategist for the campaign and has been mentioned as a possible deputy mayor. Vincent Lapadula, a former Giuliani aide who ran Mr. Bloomberg's field operations, is considered a likely candidate for chief of staff. (Coincidentally, his roommate is Anthony Carbonetti, Mr. Giuliani's chief of staff, who is expected to follow the outgoing mayor.) Ed Skyler, who was a Giuliani press aide before becoming Mr. Bloomberg's press secretary, will probably be the mayoral press secretary. Other staffers who could land City Hall posts include Kathleen Cudahy, a top policy adviser; Bill Cunningham, a strategist and communications director; Kevin Sheekey, Mr. Bloomberg's Washington political aide; and Jonathan Capehart, a policy adviser. (Crain's NY Business)

11/11
Raymond Kelly has reportedly accepted the job of police commissioner, though it has not been officially announced. (Newsday)

The story of Mr. Bloomberg's astonishing evolution from a first-time and sometimes clumsy candidate to mayor-elect of the nation's biggest and most complex city. There was a lot of luck. There was a lot of money and high-priced strategy. And there was a lot of Mr. Bloomberg being a hands-on manager who liked a good fight, but who had imposed one cardinal rule about his campaign: he would not sacrifice his good name to win the election. This triple combination helped navigate the candidacy through a series of rocky moments over five months of campaigning that might easily have sunk other candidacies, and that nearly took his down as well. (New York Times)

A glimpse at some of the 37 new members of the 51-seat City Council, whose election last Tuesday marked the largest turnover in the history of the body. For example: John C. Liu, a consultant at PriceWaterhouseCoopers who was born in Taiwan, will become the first Asian-American member of the Council, representing Flushing, Queens. Hiram Monserrate, a Democratic district leader who is a former New York City police officer, was elected as Queens's first Hispanic Council member. He will represent Corona. Charles Barron, who will represent East New York, Brooklyn, on the Council, was once a member of the Black Panthers. There are children of former council members, several clergy, and also a large number of new members of accomplishment and experience. (New York Times)

On Tuesday, Michael Bloomberg landed more than 60 percent of the white vote in defeating Mark Green for mayor. It was the fourth consecutive mayoral election in which the Republican received more white votes than the Democrat. (Daily News)

11/11
Police Commissioner Bernard B. Kerik, who supervised the New York Police Department as historic crime reductions continued and coordinated the city's response to a frightening new era of terrorism, had twice before said that he would not continue in the job past New Year's Day. But yesterday he made it official. After wavering several weeks ago when he was asked to stay on by Michael R. Bloomberg, the businessman who was elected mayor on Tuesday, Mr. Kerik said yesterday that he had phoned Mr. Bloomberg on Thursday evening to say that he was leaving. (New York Times)

Highlights of Kerik's career as police commissioner. (Daily News)

In a segment on "60 Minutes," a tearful Kerik, 46, tells of discovering recently that his mother was a prostitute who abandoned him at age 4, and may have been murdered. The commissioner discloses in a memoir due out next week, "The Lost Son," that he fathered an illegitimate child as a serviceman in South Korea in 1975 - a family he later walked out on. (Daily News)

The name mentioned most frequently as Michael Bloomberg's choice for new police commissioner is that of Mr. Bloomberg's principal adviser on criminal justice matters, Raymond W. Kelly. Mr. Kelly served as commissioner in 1992 and 1993 under Mayor Dinkins, as crime began to decline after a particularly bloody period in the city's history. Mr. Kelly, who worked from 1994 to 2000 in a number of senior federal law enforcement posts, is now the head of security for Bear Stearns. While he would not comment on whether he was interested in the appointment, Mr. Kelly described Mr. Bloomberg's approach to criminal justice as "Giuliani Plus" - blending the current mayor's successes in sharply reducing crime with improved technologies and better community relations. (New York Times)

Three days after the Democratic Party suffered a stunning defeat in the New York City mayoral election, Judith Hope, the state party chairwoman, announced she would resign Dec. 3. Party leaders said last night that Herman Farrell, the Manhattan Democratic chairman, was almost certain to replace her. Mr. Farrell was said to have locked up the support of most Democratic leaders, and did not face any immediate opposition. (New York Times)

A significant defection of Hispanic voters from the Democratic Party, coupled with stronger-than-expected showings among black voters and white liberals, helped propel Michael R. Bloomberg to victory in the mayoral election over Mark Green, according to a statistical analysis of the voting patterns in Tuesday's election. (New York Times)

11/9
Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg met yesterday with major union leaders, pledging to be a "champion" of all city workers but making no promises about salary increases. (Daily News)

Thomas Van Essen, who is praised the world over while routinely booed by his own employees, says he will not seek reappointment as fire commissioner. (NY Times)

One of the most daunting tasks for Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg will be rebuilding the morale of the devastated Fire Department. (New York Post)

From the day he began his long-shot campaign for mayor, Michael Bloomberg knew that if he won Queens, he could win the city. He was right. Republican Bloomberg defeated Democrat Mark Green by about 40,000 votes. He won Queens, where Democrats outnumber Republicans 5 to 1, by nearly 50,000 votes. The Queens strategy helped Bloomberg close Green's 16-point lead in two weeks and win Tuesday's election by 3 percentage points. The only other borough Bloomberg won, by a whopping 67,000 votes, was solidly Republican Staten Island. (Daily News)

Bloomberg toured a downtown office set aside for his transition by Mayor Rudolph Giuliani - then said he probably won't use it as his transition headquarters. He also said he "should not be involved" in the selection of a new city Council Speaker; the next speaker is expected to become the leading Democratic voice of opposition in the still-Republican City Hall. He promised to fulfill his campaign pledge to take mass transit (including taxis) every day. He said he expects an informal atmosphere at City Hall, where anyone can call him "Mike." (Newsday)

Michael Bloomberg says his administration knows what many black New Yorkers think about police, and he wants to change that perception. "To not acknowledge there's a problem doesn't make things better," Bloomberg said yesterday. "If there's a perception of [racial] profiling - even if numbers don't support it - we must address it." (Daily News)

Less than 48 hours after his victory, Mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg last night did something Mayor Giuliani never wanted to do during eight years in office - shook hands with the Rev. Al Sharpton. (New York Post)

It's no wonder Mike Bloomberg is passing up the chance to move into Gracie Mansion: His Upper East Side townhouse makes the mayoral residence look like a pauper's home. (New York Post)

11/8
As New York City mayor, will Michael Bloomberg try to keep his 72 percent stake in Bloomberg LP, the financial and media empire he built during the past two decades? If so, he might come into conflict with the city's conflict of interest laws. (Newsday)

Michael Bloomberg is likely to appoint people from a variety of backgrounds and with an array of political beliefs to his administration. And, even though he pledged to follow the policies of the Giuliani administration, he indicated that he would not necessarily try to keep the mayor's top aides. Bloomberg, who plans to name a transition team in the next few days, said he would like Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik to stay on. Kerik says he is considering the offer. (New York Times)

Even though they are unlikely to remain for a full Bloomberg administration, many top Giuliani aides say they would be prepared to remain in office a few extra months to smooth the transition. (New York Post)

Michael Bloomberg celebrated his victory in the mayoral election by taking a whirlwind tour of the city yesterday and having breakfast with Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer, whose rift with Democratic mayoral candidate Mark Green almost certainly helped Bloomberg become mayor. (Daily News)

City unions are cautiously optimistic about what they could expect from a Bloomberg administration, even though the Bloomberg financial information company is not unionized. The mayor-elect has said he supports raises for police and teachers, who are working under expired contracts. (Daily News)

The day after Election Day was a bleak day for Democrats in New York City, and many spent it casting about for whom to blame for the party£s loss in the mayoral election. Party officials worried about whether they could mount a credible challenge to Governor George Pataki next year and about their future in a city where, even though Democrats outnumber Republicans five to one, voters have elected a Republican mayor in the last three elections.

Fernando Ferrer, who lost to Mark Green in a bitter runoff election for the Democratic nomination, said Green had paid the price for using "scurrilous" tactics in his runoff campaign with Ferrer. Green associates, on the other hand, blamed Ferrer supporters, particularly Bronx Democratic leader Roberto Ramirez, who led attacks on Green and did not help his campaign. (New York Times)

The Democratic loss in the mayoral election reveals deep fault lines in the party and reflects the damage that can occur when a white and a minority candidate battle, as Mark Green and Fernando Ferrer did in the runoff election, and use racially tinged appeals. In light of this, state Democratic Party chair Judith Hope called on either state Controller Carl McCall, who is black, or former U.S. Housing Secretary Andrew Cuomo, who is white, to withdraw from the 2002 Democratic gubernatorial primary. Neither candidate said he would. (Daily News)

Although a number of factors, including the World Trade Center attack, contributed to Mark Green's defeat, he must assume some of the blame, political experts said yesterday. Noting that the Democrat had managed to squander a 16-point lead in the polls, many faulted him for not reaching out to other Democrats and involving them in his campaign. "It was Green's smug independent streak that kept him from uniting the party after the runoff, and that's largely why he lost," said Joseph Mercurio, a political consultant. (Daily News)

Now that the new mayor has been selected, city politicians are beginning to make deals and negotiate over whom will hold what is generally seen as the second most powerful job in city government: City Council speaker. In that election, though, only 51 people, the members of the council, vote. Gifford Miller of Manhattan and Angel Rodriguez of Brooklyn are among the leading contenders for the post. (Daily News)

Many political insiders thought David Garth had lost his touch. But the man who has played a role in mayoral elections since 1965 gave the Bloomberg campaign a key boost with the ad featuring Mayor Giuliani. (New York Post)

11/7
Michael Rubens Bloomberg, a self- made billionaire who set out at the age of 59 to finance a new career in politics, was elected the 108th mayor of New York City yesterday, as voters turned to him to lead a city apprehensive about the loss of a popular mayor and anxious about a future clouded by threats of terrorism and economic turmoil. (New York Times)

Millionaire. Helicopter pilot. Dad. Philanthropist. Movie producer. Bachelor about town. Media mogul. Now, Mayor Bloomberg. (Daily News)

There were not enough hands in the Democratic Party last night for all the finger-pointing that surrounded Mark Green's loss to Mike Bloomberg - the media mogul who was supposed to be a GOP pushover. But high on many lists of who to blame for Green's failure to deliver - after Green himself - were the Rev. Al Sharpton, Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer and Bronx Democratic Party chief Roberto Ramirez. (Daily News)

Crises either lionize mayors or devour them. And there's been no crisis more threatening to the city's vitality and future than the aftermath of the attacks that brought down the World Trade Center. In just two months, the staggering job of stabilizing New York's economy and rebuilding lower Manhattan will fall to the mayor-elect, Michael Bloomberg. (Daily News)

Bloomberg made enough inroads with Latino voters and parlayed a strong showing among whites to pull off a stunning upset, an exit poll showed. Eight weeks after the terror of Sept. 11, Bloomberg rode a wave of New Yorkers' concern over jobs and the economy, issues that weighed more heavily on voters' decisions than crime, terrorism and even education. In the Edison Media Research exit poll the queried 2,036 voters, Green, the Democratic public advocate, garnered 71 percent of the black vote to the Republican Bloomberg's 25 percent. (Newsday)

Columnist Joyce Purnick: How do you beat a man who can overwhelmingly outspend you with his own money and has the backing of a politician as universally admired as Franklin Delano Roosevelt was in his day? How do you overcome ethnic and racial tensions, a reputation for being less than lovable, the advantage that the tragedy of Sept. 11 gave to a first-time candidate claiming his business background as his strength? As Mark Green learned yesterday, you don't. (New York Times)

Columnist Michael Kramer: Everyone said it would be close, and this time everyone was right."It's one thing to dodge a single bullet from a Winchester," an aide to Mark Green said last night. "It's another to dodge a stream from an Uzi - and we almost did." Well, in politics, "almost" equals second place and second place equals retirement - which is where Green is heading now that Mike Bloomberg has been elected mayor. (Daily News)

Mayor Giuliani's endorsement definitely gave Mike Bloomberg a boost. (New York Post)

Mike Bloomberg capitalized on Mayor Giuliani's enormous popularity, simmering Democratic discontent, his business credentials - and more than $50 million to get his message out. The attack on the World Trade Center significantly shifted voter sentiment toward the billionaire Republican media mogul, who made his entrepreneurial experience a major selling point in an extremely well-financed campaign. (New York Post)

The trail of harshly negative TV and radio ads launched by Mark Green and Michael Bloomberg will be remembered as some of the most down-and-dirty the city has ever seen. (New York Post)

A surprisingly big chunk of Mark Green's supporters in last month's runoff dumped him yesterday for rival Mike Bloomberg, joined by an even stronger wave of Hispanics who had backed Fernando Ferrer in the Democratic race. (New York Post)

The next mayor faces such daunting budget problems that some people in government openly wonder - only half jokingly - why anyone wants the job. "Why do you want to put yourself through this?" asked one city councilman, referring to the grave decisions facing the new mayor. (New York Post)

Coming soon to a mayor near you: huge deficits, a private-sector slowdown and a power struggle with the governor. And that's just for starters. To keep parks tidy, streets clean and libraries open, while meeting costly new obligations to protect public health and security, the 108th mayor will be forced to scrimp and save, painfully so. He'll also face resistance from unions forced to do without large raises, a retirement outflow by police officers, a shortage of experienced teachers, growing poverty, and heightened pressures to raise taxes. As for reducing class sizes, building affordable housing, and subsidizing new baseball and football stadiums, forget about it. (Newsday)

Betsy Gotbaum ran for public advocate not as the outsider who will stir things up but as the insider who can get things done. It worked. Gotbaum, the only major-party candidate running for the office, won easily Tuesday. Early returns showed her with 87 percent of the vote. (Newsday)

The City Council is in for a new look. Thanks largely to term limits, 38 of 51 Council seats were on the ballot in yesterday's election, making way for the biggest change since the City Charter revision added 16 seats in 1991. (Daily News)

New Yorkers who went to the polls yesterday to vote in City Council races were participating in an election that, because of new term limit laws, brought about the most sweeping changes in the Council since the five boroughs came together more than 100 years ago to form modern New York City. (New York Times)

Voters approved all five of the City Charter revision proposals on the ballot yesterday by wide margins and passed a proposal to make the language of the State Constitution gender-neutral. (New York Times)

There had been predictions of mayhem: broken machines, overwhelming lines, Florida-like chaos. But when voters finally made it to the polls yesterday for the city's general election, they found only a few sporadic glitches. The most serious seemed to be the ballot itself, which left many voters struggling, behind the curtains, to locate levers corresponding to a group of City Charter proposals. All in all, at first glance, not a bad day for those who had envisioned the worst and sounded a steady drumbeat of electoral doom. (New York Times)

Misprints in polling machines left some Bronx voters scratching their heads, but Board of Elections officials said that overall, yesterday's voting brought no more problems than usual. Some machines in areas that included Riverdale, Fordham and the South Bronx had a variety of errors in the printing of proposals on gun safety and children's services. (Daily News)

11/7
Michael Rubens Bloomberg, a self- made billionaire who set out at the age of 59 to finance a new career in politics, was elected the 108th mayor of New York City yesterday, as voters turned to him to lead a city apprehensive about the loss of a popular mayor and anxious about a future clouded by threats of terrorism and economic turmoil. (New York Times)

Millionaire. Helicopter pilot. Dad. Philanthropist. Movie producer. Bachelor about town. Media mogul. Now, Mayor Bloomberg. (Daily News)

There were not enough hands in the Democratic Party last night for all the finger-pointing that surrounded Mark Green's loss to Mike Bloomberg - the media mogul who was supposed to be a GOP pushover. But high on many lists of who to blame for Green's failure to deliver - after Green himself - were the Rev. Al Sharpton, Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer and Bronx Democratic Party chief Roberto Ramirez. (Daily News)

Crises either lionize mayors or devour them. And there's been no crisis more threatening to the city's vitality and future than the aftermath of the attacks that brought down the World Trade Center. In just two months, the staggering job of stabilizing New York's economy and rebuilding lower Manhattan will fall to the mayor-elect, Michael Bloomberg. (Daily News)

Bloomberg made enough inroads with Latino voters and parlayed a strong showing among whites to pull off a stunning upset, an exit poll showed. Eight weeks after the terror of Sept. 11, Bloomberg rode a wave of New Yorkers' concern over jobs and the economy, issues that weighed more heavily on voters' decisions than crime, terrorism and even education. In the Edison Media Research exit poll the queried 2,036 voters, Green, the Democratic public advocate, garnered 71 percent of the black vote to the Republican Bloomberg's 25 percent. (Newsday)

Columnist Joyce Purnick: How do you beat a man who can overwhelmingly outspend you with his own money and has the backing of a politician as universally admired as Franklin Delano Roosevelt was in his day? How do you overcome ethnic and racial tensions, a reputation for being less than lovable, the advantage that the tragedy of Sept. 11 gave to a first-time candidate claiming his business background as his strength? As Mark Green learned yesterday, you don't. (New York Times)

Columnist Michael Kramer: Everyone said it would be close, and this time everyone was right."It's one thing to dodge a single bullet from a Winchester," an aide to Mark Green said last night. "It's another to dodge a stream from an Uzi - and we almost did." Well, in politics, "almost" equals second place and second place equals retirement - which is where Green is heading now that Mike Bloomberg has been elected mayor. (Daily News)

Mayor Giuliani's endorsement definitely gave Mike Bloomberg a boost. (New York Post)

Mike Bloomberg capitalized on Mayor Giuliani's enormous popularity, simmering Democratic discontent, his business credentials - and more than $50 million to get his message out. The attack on the World Trade Center significantly shifted voter sentiment toward the billionaire Republican media mogul, who made his entrepreneurial experience a major selling point in an extremely well-financed campaign. (New York Post)

The trail of harshly negative TV and radio ads launched by Mark Green and Michael Bloomberg will be remembered as some of the most down-and-dirty the city has ever seen. (New York Post)

A surprisingly big chunk of Mark Green's supporters in last month's runoff dumped him yesterday for rival Mike Bloomberg, joined by an even stronger wave of Hispanics who had backed Fernando Ferrer in the Democratic race. (New York Post)

The next mayor faces such daunting budget problems that some people in government openly wonder - only half jokingly - why anyone wants the job. "Why do you want to put yourself through this?" asked one city councilman, referring to the grave decisions facing the new mayor. (New York Post)

Coming soon to a mayor near you: huge deficits, a private-sector slowdown and a power struggle with the governor. And that's just for starters. To keep parks tidy, streets clean and libraries open, while meeting costly new obligations to protect public health and security, the 108th mayor will be forced to scrimp and save, painfully so. He'll also face resistance from unions forced to do without large raises, a retirement outflow by police officers, a shortage of experienced teachers, growing poverty, and heightened pressures to raise taxes. As for reducing class sizes, building affordable housing, and subsidizing new baseball and football stadiums, forget about it. (Newsday)

Betsy Gotbaum ran for public advocate not as the outsider who will stir things up but as the insider who can get things done. It worked. Gotbaum, the only major-party candidate running for the office, won easily Tuesday. Early returns showed her with 87 percent of the vote. (Newsday)

The City Council is in for a new look. Thanks largely to term limits, 38 of 51 Council seats were on the ballot in yesterday's election, making way for the biggest change since the City Charter revision added 16 seats in 1991. (Daily News)

New Yorkers who went to the polls yesterday to vote in City Council races were participating in an election that, because of new term limit laws, brought about the most sweeping changes in the Council since the five boroughs came together more than 100 years ago to form modern New York City. (New York Times)

Voters approved all five of the City Charter revision proposals on the ballot yesterday by wide margins and passed a proposal to make the language of the State Constitution gender-neutral. (New York Times)

There had been predictions of mayhem: broken machines, overwhelming lines, Florida-like chaos. But when voters finally made it to the polls yesterday for the city's general election, they found only a few sporadic glitches. The most serious seemed to be the ballot itself, which left many voters struggling, behind the curtains, to locate levers corresponding to a group of City Charter proposals. All in all, at first glance, not a bad day for those who had envisioned the worst and sounded a steady drumbeat of electoral doom. (New York Times)

Misprints in polling machines left some Bronx voters scratching their heads, but Board of Elections officials said that overall, yesterday's voting brought no more problems than usual. Some machines in areas that included Riverdale, Fordham and the South Bronx had a variety of errors in the printing of proposals on gun safety and children's services. (Daily News)

11/6
The New York Times repeats its endorsements: Mark Green for mayor, and on the six ballot proposals: 1. Yes to making the State Constitution gender-neutral. 2 to 6. No to these five proposals, which are unnecessary changes to the City Charter. (New York Times)

The Daily News endorsements: Michael Bloomberg for mayor, yes on all the city charter proposals except the third one, about the Human Rights Commission. (Daily News)

The New York Post endorses neither candidate for mayor. "Neither man comes close to filling Rudy Giuliani's shoes - and Giuliani-esque leadership is precisely what New York needs just now." (New York Post)

Newsday endorses Mark Green for mayor, yes to making the State Constitution gender-neutral, yes on charter revision proposal 1 (Children's Services) and 5 (Public Safety), no on the rest. (Newsday)

Crains New York Business endorsed Mark Green for mayor.

For other endorsements, scroll through the past month of Campaign Trail on Searchlight on Campaign 2001

Included in the flurry of campaign literature mailed to voters over the last several days was a postcard from the city's Charter Revision Commission. The postcard, which features a picture of Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani shaking hands with a firefighter, is meant to remind voters that there are five proposals on the ballot today, and to educate them about what those proposals are, an "educational campaign" required by law, commission officials say. But some groups have questioned whether that mailing crosses the line into advocacy of the proposals.The city, which uses taxpayer money to pay for the required education effort, is not allowed to advocate for or against reforms to the charter, reforms that the mayor has called for. (New York Times)

Mark Green and Michael R. Bloomberg yesterday completed the final day of a contest for mayor that both sides said had turned unexpectedly whisker-close. Mr. Bloomberg campaigned at the side of Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, whose support has proved critical to his candidacy, while Mr. Green campaigned with Kennedys and former President Clinton, and released a harsh advertisement that recounted charges made against Mr. Bloomberg in a sexual harassment suit. (New York Times)

Infuriated by "despicable and racist" campaign literature, the Rev. Al Sharpton refused late last night to endorse Democratic mayoral candidate Mark Green - but backed off his threat to call for a black boycott of today's election. (Daily News)

11/5
The contest between Mark Green and Michael R. Bloomberg hurtled through a brutal and expensive final weekend yesterday. Mr. Green took to the pulpits of black churches in Brooklyn to accuse Mr. Bloomberg of insensitivity toward black and female New Yorkers. Mr. Bloomberg filled the airwaves with television advertisements warning that Mr. Green would "tear apart City Hall" if elected. With the campaign down to its final hours - and a series of polls showing the two men essentially tied, with a huge number of voters still undecided - the candidates and their aides moved through the day to diminish their opponent. (New York Times)

11/4
Bloomberg and Green on education, labor, taxes and budgeting, security and policing. (New York Times)

The Daily News endorses Michael Bloomberg for mayor: "Bloomberg is tough and independent, just as a New York mayor must be. He is smart. He is accomplished. And he will bring to City Hall the kind of fresh ideas and perspective that this moment of devastating crisis demands. Bloomberg's opponent, Mark Green, has many attractive attributes. He has shown himself to be a serious candidate with serious ideas. Perhaps, in ordinary times, he would be an acceptable choice. But in this extraordinary time, Bloomberg is the candidate with the right skills." (Daily News)

Newsday endorses Mark Green for mayor. "Green seems to have learned plenty and to be more ready for the task than Bloomberg. He ran his campaign not as a paleo-liberal this time, but as a reformer and a moderate. He brought William Bratton, the former police commissioner who helped revolutionize the NYPD's crime-fighting tactics, into his fold. So now, Green not only has a long record as a police critic, he also has the support of most city police unions. At the same time - to our relief - he has preached during the campaign that the United Federation of Teachers must trade work-rule flexibility for pay increases. As a result, the teachers didn't support him during the primaries. Neither did city workers in District Council 37 or the hospital workers in Local 1199.

These are good signs. They mean that Green, if elected, would owe these groups little. While Green's past life as a noisy liberal gadfly has hardly inspired our confidence, we think he has matured as a politician. As for Bloomberg, while he is intellectually agile and astonishingly savvy about local issues, he's still not ready to turn pro. Not in this league. Not at this time. If New Yorkers were to elect him next week, they would have to give him maybe a year to hit his stride as a politician. The city cannot afford to wait." (Newsday)

Already conducting the priciest campaign in New York State history, Bloomberg looks certain to spend more than $50 million of his own money in the race for City Hall. The billionaire businessman has spent more than $24 million for advertising, $4.6 million for polls and $1.5 million for 15 different campaign consultant. Put another way, Bloomberg will pay out enough of his own money to build two new elementary schools in Queens or to match the city's median family income of $50,600 for nearly 9,000 families. (Newsday)

11/3
Republican Michael Bloomberg and Democrat Mark Green bounded yesterday into the final weekend of the mayoral race on an avalanche of blistering new attack ads and mailings. One of Bloomberg's new ads, targeting white voters, paints New York as a safer, more prosperous city, adding, "Every step of the way Mark Green attacked and criticized the changes ... He'll tear apart Mayor Giuliani's City Hall, turn our city back." Green's harsh new ad paints his billionaire rival as out of step with New Yorkers. It asks, "Does Bloomberg care about equal rights?" and seizes on remarks by Bloomberg that public school kids "have personal hygiene problems," and that sanitation workers have more dangerous jobs than cops and firefighters. (Daily News)

According to the latest New York Times poll, Mark Green, a Democrat, is supported by 42 percent of those most likely to vote and Michael Bloomberg, a Republican, by 37 percent. The difference is not statistically significant. About 20 percent are undecided - an unusually high figure for this late in the contest. (New York Times)

A "Unity Dinner" for Mark Green's mayoral campaign did not quite live up to its billing last night. Leading Hispanic officials, including Fernando Ferrer, boycotted the event to show their continuing anger and suspicion over tactics used in the runoff election between Mr. Green and Mr. Ferrer, the Bronx borough president. (New York Times)

11/2
Mark Green and Michael Bloomberg debated last night for the last time in the mayoral race, clashing repeatedly over their qualifications and battling over campaign tactics, education policy and even their personalities. For much of the 60 minutes, they fought over whether Green's record of public service or Bloomberg's resume building a global business are what the city needs to recover from the economic damage caused by the World Trade Center collapse. "My opponent has not had any experience in managing a large organization, in leading a large number of people, in setting large budgets, in actually doing things," said Bloomberg, a billionaire Republican making his first run for office. "My rival hasn't spent one minute in public life," Green, the city's public advocate, said. He added, "You don't understand the city by spending a lot of private dollars in an election year." (Daily News) (New York Times)

Mayoral hopeful Mark Green began rolling out the big guns yesterday, stumping with former President Bill Clinton in Harlem as part of a massive end-of-campaign push to rally Democrats to his candidacy. As part of the strategy, the Democratic National Committee will showcase Green tomorrow by having him deliver the party's nationally broadcast response to President Bush's weekly Saturday radio address. (Daily News)

Michael Bloomberg was endorsed by both former Governor Hugh Carey and former Mayor Ed Koch. The Democrats said they endorsed Bloomberg, a Republican, partly because of their distaste for the media mogul's Democratic rival, Mark Green. (Daily News)

Four aides to Mark Green met with top Brooklyn Democrats and discussed strategies for highlighting Fernando Ferrer's link to the Rev. Al Sharpton, a week before the Green-Ferrer mayoral runoff. Several participants said the meeting focused on how to galvanize Jewish voters for Green by highlighting Ferrer's relationship to Sharpton, who is reviled by many Jews. (Daily News)

11/1
In an interview with the New York Times, Republican mayoral candidate Michael Bloomberg said that the financial crisis facing the city is serious but can be managed and that private business, not government aid, is key to how well New York weathers it. The Republican mayoral hopeful stressed his experience as an entrepreneur. He said he was surprised that he had been so harshly criticized for spending millions of his own money to win the election and for some of his verbal missteps. (New York Times)

Attacks and endorsements continued to mark the mayoral campaign yesterday. Michael Bloomberg attacked rival Mark Green for not disclosing who is working for his campaign and reacted angrily to charges surfacing about his response to an allegation of a rape at his company a few years ago. Green, meanwhile, won the support of Bronx Democratic leader Roberto Ramirez, who had been key to the unsuccessful mayoral bid by Fernando Ferrer, and announced he was borrowing $1 million to finance a last minute television ad blitz. (New York Times)

Michael Bloomberg has asked Bernard Kerik to remain on as police commissioner if Bloomberg is elected mayor. Kerik had previously said he would leave office when Mayor Rudolph Giuliani does, but sources told the Post that he is "seriously leaning toward" accepting the offer from Bloomberg. (New York Post)

The Detectives' Endowment Association and two unions representing Port Authority police yesterday announced their support for Mark Green, giving the Democratic mayoral candidate the support of virtually all the major uniformed law enforcement unions except the one representing corrections officers. (Daily News)

Michael Bloomberg has sent thousands of Hispanic voters a glossy mailing featuring a picture of Bronx Borough President and unsuccessful mayoral candidate Fernando Ferrer. The leaflets have reportedly angered aides to Ferrer, who fought a bitter runoff campaign with Democratic mayoral candidate Mark Green but is now supporting Green. (New York Post)

Billionaire Michael Bloomberg strongly defended his decision not to release to his complete tax returns, saying his opponents had released their returns because "they don't make anything." Bloomberg previously said that disclosing the exact dollar figures in his tax return would jeopardize his privately held financial communications firm. (Daily News)

Michael Bloomberg has spent $41 million for his mayoral bid so far, buying television advertising but also giving money and loaning office space to political organizations that back his candidacy. The outpouring of funds has alarmed some Democrats who say the Democratic National Committee has been slow to spend money to support Mark Green. But now, with a week to go before Election Day, Green may finally be getting some help. (New York Observer)

The highly competitive race for the City Council from the 32nd District in Queens pits the son of a late U.S. representative against a former City Council aide. (New York Times)

October Campaign Trail

My Street Address:

My ZIP Code:



Find what city council district you are in -- and learn more about what's going on there, and who's running.


What is this?
Gotham Gazette's Searchlight on Campaign 2001 offers a comprehensive look at what is being called New York City's most significant campaign season in modern history. (See the left-hand column for an explanation).


Districts of the Week

District 1 -- Lower Manhattan
Whoever wins the election in district 1 will represent immigrant Chinese garment workers, as well as Wall Street traders living in Battery Park City. There are several candidates hoping to be the council's firsts -- the first Asian-American man, the first Asian-American woman, the first gay Rhodes Scholar, the first dot-com guru -- running against some politically well connected opponents. Endorsements and fundraising will play a big role in this race. But voter turnout could be the main determinant of who will next represent district 1 on the council. The key question is how many voters from each community will come out on Election Day.

District 7 -- Washington Heights, Manhattan
The northern tip of Manhattan has become one of the most popular places for new immigrants to call home. The northern tip of Manhattan is a place that today's new immigrants call home. The majority have come from the Dominican Republic, but also from countries in South America, Eastern Europe, and Asia. But it is not just new immigrants that are moving in. Students, artists, and other Manhattanites looking for less expensive rents and larger apartments have also moved north. Ten Democratic candidates are competing for the 15,000 voters expected on primary day. The winner who emerges from a crowded field of candidates will have to balance the needs of the newcomers with those who have lived there for years.

District 16 -- Highbridge, Bronx
The neighborhoods of district 16 are the city's poorest, with the highest rate of unemployment and the lowest median household income. But those who live there also point out that much is positive and stable about the area, thanks in large part to local organizations, not-for-profit agencies, and houses of worship that help hold the neighborhoods together. Each candidate for City Council believes that through his or her connections to churches and local organizations, they can help empower the community toward a better life. Helen Foster, the current council member daughter, will face Michael Benjamin, who has worked as an aide to several government officials and Anthony Curry, a Bronx neighborhood activist.

District 20 -- Northeast Flushing, Queens
This year district 20 may elect the first Asian-American ever to the City Council to an area which now has the second highest number of immigrants from Korea and Taiwan in the city. There are three Asian candidates in the Democratic race who have each drawn big endorsements. Council Speaker Peter Vallone endorsed Terence Park, City Comptroller Alan Hevesi endorsed John Liu, and the New York Times recently endorsed Ethel Chen The campaign has also drawn national and international press coverage

District 25 -- Jackson Heights, Queens
Thirty-seventh Avenue in Jackson Heights, Queens is one of the most diverse streets in the world. Little India quickly blends into Little Colombia, with vendors selling Latin American food to Colombians, Peruvians, Ecuadorians, Mexicans, and Uruguayans. And each summer, the Queens Pride Parade fills the same street with rainbow banners. So it is no surprise that this election year the district produced a diverse field of candidates. A number of them, however, found out that getting on the ballot is not an easy task, especially when the Queens Democratic organization sends teams of lawyers to challenge petitions. But five Democratic candidates survived and will face off on September 11.

District 31 -- South East Queens
When a heavy rain hits southeast Queens, many residents in neighborhoods like Springfield Gardens, Laurelton and Rosedale head to the basement with a bucket in hand. And it has been that way for the last 50 years. In the rush to build housing in the area after World War II, developers overlooked the need for storm drains in hopes that the city would eventually build a city-wide sewer system. The plan never materialized and the area has experienced "100-year rains" three times in the last decade. The eight Democrats -- all with little experience overseeing massive infrastructure projects--will try to convince voters that they can finally solve the flooding problems.

District 35 -- Central Brooklyn
The residents in council district 35 have some of the highest incomes in Brooklyn and some of the lowest. They can play in a famous park and a beautiful botanical garden, and live in the city's most crumbling public housing. They can attend one of the four institutions of higher learning in the district, and the worst-scoring high schools in the city. Such juxtapositions are a way of life for a district that includes the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens; mid dle-class African-American communities near Prospect Park; immigrant communities from Haiti, Sierra Leon, Nigeria, and Trinidad, and in Crown Heights, a mix of Hasidic Jews and African-Americans. Seven Democratic candidates are campaigning in hopes that they can bring some kind of unity, and attention, to the area. Their backgrounds are as diverse as the neighborhoods themselves.

District 39 -- Park Slope/Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn
The candidates in district 39 include a chief of staff for an Assemblywoman, the husband of a member of U.S. Congress, a lawyer for the Legal Aid Society, an attorney and president of the Central Brooklyn Independent Democrats, Senator Hillary Clinton's campaign manager, the district manager of Community Board 6, and a labor organizer. This is the race to watch this year. The group of high-profile Democrats have raised a lot of money, almost $1.4 million combined.

District 45 -- East Flatbush
In no place in the city are the effects of campaign finance reform and term limits being felt more than in East Flatbush. The seven Democratic candidates seeking to represent this largely West Indian district come from a number of Caribbean nations. Many have been working on politicians' staffs and serving with community groups, clearly hoping someday to win their own elected office. Term limits has presented them with that opportunity, and they want to make the most of it. But this race that usually draws only about 8,000 voters could be decided by just a few votes. The candidates are attempting to come up with anything that will separate them from the pack.

District 49 -- North Shore, Staten Island
Staten Island has always been somewhat of a suburban stepchild to New York City. When a 1998 survey asked New Yorkers why they go to Staten Island, the top two responses were ''visiting friends and relatives" and ''passing through.'' But in many ways, the north shore has more in common with areas of Manhattan and Brooklyn than with the rest of the Staten Island. The top priority for all the candidates -- Jon Del Giorno, an administrative manager for the Board of Elections, Mike McMahon, an attorney and counsel to current Councilmember Jerome O'Donovan, and Debi Rose, an administrator at the College of Staten Island and the first African-American candidate in Staten Island politics -- is to make sure that the island becomes more than just a turn-around-point for the over one million tourists who ride the free ferry from Manhattan each year.


Register To Vote or Be A Poll Worker

Voter Registration Forms
After printing and filling out the voter registration form, please send them by mail to:

Board of Elections
32 Broadway, 7th Floor
New York, NY
10004-1609

You will need Acrobat Reader to view these forms.



Poll Worker Applications

After completing the forms, please send them to the address on the form.

You will need Acrobat Reader to view these forms.


Links You Can Use

Government sites
NYC Campaign Finance Bd.
NYC Board of Elections
NYC Voter Assistance Comm.
NY City Council
Federal Election Comm.

Local non-partisan sites
SavvyVoter.org
NYVote.com
Votesmart
NYPIRG
NY League of Women Voters
Common Cause New York

National non-partisan sites
Ctr. for Responsive Politics
Common Cause
DemocracyNet
League of Women Voters

NAACP Voter Empowerment
Vote Smart

E-Voting
Election.com

Political consultants
Amer. Assc. of Pol. Consultants

Prime New York

Media
Gotham Gazette
The Empire Page
Campaigns and Elections
Legislative Gazette

Political columnists
Andrea Bernstein
Joe Conason
Mario Cuomo (radio)
Rudy Giuliani (radio)
Clyde Haberman
Nat Hentoff

Joseph Mercurio
Joyce Purnick
John Tierney
Michael Tomasky

Political parties
Conservative
Democratic
Green
Independence
Liberal
Republican
Right to Life
Working Families
Communist
Libertarian
Marijuana Reform
Natural Law Party
Socialist
Taxpayers Party

Political clubs and groups
Blueprint Camp. Finance Reform
DL21C
Central Queens Greens
The Jefferson Democratic Club of Flushing
NY Young Republican Club
Stonewall Democratic Club
Village Independent Dems.


Abbreviations for Party Affiliation

American Dream Party (AMD)
Better Schools Party (BES)
Communist (Com)
Conservative (Con)
Constitution (CST)
Democratic (Dem)
Friends United Party (FUN)
Fusion Party (FUS)
Green (Gre)
Harmony Party (HAR)
Independence (Ind)
Liberal (Lib)
Libertarian (LBT)
Marijuana Reform Party (POT)
Natural Law Party (NLP)
Party of Ethics and Traditions (PET)
Reform Party (Ref)
Republican (Rep)
Right to Life (RTL)
School Choice Party (Sch)
Socialist Workers Party (SWP)
Working Families (Wor)


2001 Election Calendar

June 1 -- Deadline for candidates to join the Campaign Finance program, qualifying for the four-to-one match of contributions.
June 5 - First day for candidates from the eight major parties (Democratic, Republican, Indpendence, Conservative, Liberal, Green, Working Families, and Right to Life) to circulate petitions. Candidates running for City Council must collect the signatures of at least 900 people living in the district for which they are running in order to appear on the Primary ballot. Candidates not running under these eight major parties do not appear on the Primary ballot and have a separate set of deadlines.
July 12 - Deadline for major party candidates to file petitions.
July 10 - First day for unaffiliated candidates to circulate petitions, in order to appear on the ballot in the General Election. They must collect the number of signatures equal to five percent of the total enrolled in that party.
August 7 - Board of Elections announces candidates appearing on the Primary ballot.
August 17 - Last day for non-absentee voters to register to vote in the Primary Election.
August 21 - Deadline for non-major party candidates to file petitions to be included on the General Election ballot.
September 4 - Last day to postmark application for absentee voting in the Primary
September 10 - Last day to personally deliver application for absentee voting in the Primary Last day to postmark absentee ballot for Primary
September 11 - Primary election; Polls open at 6:00a.m. and close at 9:00p.m.; Absentee ballots must be hand-delivered by 9:00 p.m.
September 25 - Runoff Primary election for Mayor, Comptroller and Public Advocate, if needed
October 12 - Last day to for non-absentee voters to register to vote in the General Election
October 30 - Last day to postmark application for absentee voting in the General Election
November 5 - Last day to hand-deliver an application for absentee voting, or to postmark an absentee ballot for the General Election.
November 6 - General Election; polls open at 6:00a.m. and close at 9:00p.m. in NYC; Absentee ballots must be hand-delivered by 9:00 p.m.

This website is brought to you by Citizens Union Foundation and is made possible by grants from the Charles H. Revson Foundation, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and viewers like you.