Gotham Gazette Gotham Gazette is an online publication covering New York policy and politics as well as news on public safety, transportation, education, finance and more. https://www.gothamgazette.com/component/tags/tag/laura-anglin 2019-08-24T20:28:08+00:00 Webmaster webmaster@gothamgazette.com City's Promised Plan for Quality-of-Life Issues Yet to Materialize 2019-08-21T02:35:06+00:00 2019-08-21T02:35:06+00:00 https://www.gothamgazette.com/city/8750-city-s-promised-plan-for-quality-of-life-issues-yet-to-materialize Super User <p><img src="https://www.gothamgazette.com/images/30209332638_b998c55e75_z.jpg" alt="30209332638 b998c55e75 z" width="640" height="427" /></p> <p>Mayor Bill de Blasio (photo:Benjamin Kanter/Mayor's Office)</p> <hr /> <p>As stories of overflowing trash and endless street noise pile up on <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/12/nyregion/trash-nyc.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">social media and in the news</a>, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration has repeatedly said it is working on comprehensive approaches to some of the most challenging so-called quality-of-life issues affecting New Yorkers, but has yet to reveal an overarching vision for what the city plans to do.</p> <p>Last October, Deputy Mayor of Operations Laura Anglin, who was appointed to the newly created role in January 2018, <a href="https://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7970-what-s-the-data-point-45-with-deputy-mayor-of-operations-laura-anglin" target="_blank" rel="noopener">said</a> her office was doing “a big study,” ordered by the mayor, to determine where the city needs to focus its attention to reduce complaints about quality-of-life problems. She said she wanted to identify the most critical needs utilizing a variety of indicators that go beyond some of the city’s typical metrics to see if they can shed new light on residents’ experiences.</p> <p>Under de Blasio the city has undertaken piece-meal initiatives to address quality of life, an enormous category that can include anything from neighborhood cleanliness to noise pollution to traffic congestion. Yet administration officials say they are still not ready to talk about the study ten months after Anglin mentioned it and few, if any, details have been released.</p> <p>“Our goal is to use this study to determine the specific needs of neighborhoods – and citywide – to give us a blueprint for the different solutions we can continue to implement to have a positive impact for all New Yorkers,” Anglin wrote in an email to Gotham Gazette Tuesday, without providing details on when the study might be released or its scope. She did tout the administration’s rat reduction program, which the mayor put <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/472-17/de-blasio-administration-32-million-neighborhood-rat-reduction-plan#/0" target="_blank" rel="noopener">$32 million</a> towards in 2017 and <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/195-18/mayor-de-blasio-targets-rats-extermination-10-nycha-developments#/0" target="_blank" rel="noopener">expanded</a> to 10 NYCHA facilities with serious rodent problems in 2018.</p> <p>Though Anglin’s portfolio includes a wide range of departments, both internal- and external-facing, addressing New Yorkers’ “quality of life” has been one of her primary tasks. She is responsible for overseeing the Department of Administrative Citywide Services, the Mayor’s Office of Contract Services, the Department of Finance, and the city’s information technology. The Department of Transportation, Taxi &amp; Limousine Commission, Fire Department, emergency management, and the Department of Sanitation fall under her purview as well.</p> <p>“One of the things the mayor has asked me to do is to really...look at quality-of-life issues from the resident perspective...using the survey data that [Citizens Budget Commission] has pulled together, as well as data from 311, Twitter, other social media,” Anglin said last year on the <a href="https://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7970-what-s-the-data-point-45-with-deputy-mayor-of-operations-laura-anglin" target="_blank" rel="noopener">What’s the Data Point?</a> podcast from Gotham Gazette and Citizens Budget Commission.</p> <p>Anglin was referring to a <a href="https://cbcny.org/sites/default/files/media/files/CBC%20Resident%20Feedback%20Survey%20Report.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">survey</a> of city residents conducted by CBC in 2017 to gauge public perception on the quality of city life and government services. Among other things, the survey generally expresses what the proliferation of sanitation-related images on social media reflect: New Yorkers, in many cases, are not satisfied with conditions on the street.</p> <p>According to CBC’s data, residents have pointed to noise and sanitation as among the greatest areas of dissatisfaction in the city and de Blasio seems to have taken heed of those complaints.</p> <p>When Anglin was named deputy mayor in January 2018, one of her main tasks was street cleanliness, she said in the October interview. “That’s a big thing we’re focused on here in the city and one of the things that I will be focusing on even more,” she said.</p> <p>Another was addressing noise pollution.</p> <p>Faced with a growing number of noise complaints in recent years, de Blasio has directed Anglin to prioritize ways to reduce decibel levels from countless sources in America’s largest city. Noisy neighbors, street traffic, construction, and helicopters all contribute to the loud sounds of the city. “I directed my Deputy Mayor for Operations to look at how we can reduce noise pollution across the board. I think it’s one of the biggest concerns New Yorkers have,” the mayor said on WNYC radio’s <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/ask-mayor-7-27-18/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Brian Lehrer Show last year</a>.</p> <p>A <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/nyregion/new-york-becomes-the-city-that-never-shuts-up.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">New York Times analysis</a> found that in 2016 over half of noise complaints made to 311, the city’s helpline, were due to loud music or parties. In December, responding to callers on <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/the-brian-lehrer-show-2018-12-28" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Brian Lehrer Show</a>, de Blasio suggested expanding the enforcement power of police officers responding to noise complaints. Overall, last year, the number of 311 noise complaints rose to nearly 437,000, up from roughly 260,000 in 2013.</p> <p>The CBC data shows 40.4% of residents surveyed rate the city’s control of street noise as “excellent or good,” with the worst ratings in Manhattan, the Bronx, and Brooklyn. The CBC received over 9,800 responses to its questionnaire, representing every borough, community board, and almost every neighborhood. The survey also looked at racial differences in quality-of-life satisfaction: the group least distressed by city noise are white residents – roughly 44% rated conditions favorable -- while only 35% of Hispanic respondents, the lowest rating, felt the city was doing a good job keeping noise down.</p> <p>Both before and after Anglin was promoted to deputy mayor, de Blasio has discussed measures to deal with other kinds of noise, like reducing <a href="https://nypost.com/2016/01/31/city-announces-deal-to-cut-helicopter-traffic-in-half/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">helicopter traffic</a>, limiting <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/042-18/mayor-signs-legislation-help-limit-construction-noise" target="_blank" rel="noopener">construction noise</a>, and changing the sound of <a href="https://wcbs880.radio.com/articles/city-hall-considers-gentler-sounding-sirens-reduce-noise-pollution" target="_blank" rel="noopener">emergency sirens</a>. Speaking with Gotham Gazette and CBC in October, Anglin also spoke about noise from roadwork and afterhours construction as something the city can manage.</p> <p>“Our Deputy Mayor for Operations, Laura Anglin, is putting together a new plan to address a variety of elements of noise pollution. And it needs a little more work, but we’ll have something to say on that soon,” de Blasio said more than a year ago, last August 9, in response to a press question on the subject of noise pollution, <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/405-18/transcript-mayor-de-blasio-attends-rally-celebrating-passage-for-hire-vehicle-legislation" target="_blank" rel="noopener">after a rally</a> on another topic.</p> <p>In June of this year, the mayor and City Council announced an agreement on the city’s $92.8 billion fiscal year <a href="https://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/ny-bill-de-blasio-city-council-budget-deal-fiscal-year-2020-20190614-2bk4jp43hvgqrerzmd25znrmo4-story.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">2020 budget</a>, which included $1.5 million to equip Fire Department vehicles with quieter sirens.</p> <p>The budget also included additional funding for litter basket collection – $8.6 million, up $3.5 million from the previous year according to a Department of Sanitation spokesperson. “Our committee is constantly fielding complaints from New Yorkers that there is too much trash on the streets. The solution is simple: More litter basket collection,” said Council Member Antonio Reynoso, chair of the sanitation and solid waste committee, in a statement in May calling for the mayor to restore funding for the service before the budget was finalized.</p> <p>In 2018, the Department of Sanitation received nearly 41,000 complaints through 311 related to missed refuse collections, nearly 2.5 times the number of 2013 complaints. Another 39,000 complaints fell under “dirty conditions,” up from the roughly 33,000 similar complaints filed in 2010.</p> <p>The CBC survey, which captures New Yorker satisfaction, helps put this data into perspective. Less than half of respondents -- 47.7% -- put the cleanliness of their neighborhoods in the “excellent or good” range. The results show great variability by borough and ethnicity: the Bronx and Brooklyn scored significantly lower than Staten Island; and, the survey notes, Asian and Pacific Islander and white residents were satisfied with sanitation conditions close to 10 percentage points more than other respondents.</p> <p>But the CBC survey is notably different from the types of metrics the city is currently using to evaluate issues like neighborhood cleanliness -- both in terms of methodology and results.</p> <p>Garcia told Gotham Gazette the main metric the Department of Sanitation uses to measure cleanliness is the “scorecard” produced by the Mayor’s Office of Operations and published in the annual Mayor’s Management Report, which details data on agency performance and city services. The scorecard calculates cleanliness based on data collected by field inspectors looking at things like the amount of trash in the street, which do not capture resident satisfaction. “The basic metric on cleanliness has been the scorecard, and it’s been the scorecard for years and years and years,” she said.</p> <p>Far from the CBC survey results, the scorecard rated 95% of city streets “acceptably clean” and as “filthy” just 0.2% of the time in fiscal year 2016. Questions about the scorecards have been <a href="https://www.gothamgazette.com/government/5611-bushwick-students-give-citys-street-cleanliness-scorecards-an-incomplete" target="_blank" rel="noopener">raised</a> in the past.</p> <p>“We always strive to make sure residents are happy, but I think the methodology probably is very, very different...How you feel about something can vary based on your experience. We certainly want the public to feel like everything is cleaner,” Garcia said.</p> <p>“If you’re sitting in Laura Anglin’s seat, you’re wondering, what is the disconnect here?” said Maria Doulis, Vice President of CBC, in an interview, referring to the discrepancy between the city’s metrics and the CBC survey.</p> <p>“What are folks seeing and experiencing that is different than what our inspectors are seeing? Are inspectors looking for things that don’t really matter to people?,” Doulis added. “I think those are all appropriate questions to be asking, if you’re thinking about tackling this kind of problem.”</p> <p>

***
by Ethan Geringer-Sameth, reporter, Gotham Gazette      

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="https://www.gothamgazette.com/images/30209332638_b998c55e75_z.jpg" alt="30209332638 b998c55e75 z" width="640" height="427" /></p> <p>Mayor Bill de Blasio (photo:Benjamin Kanter/Mayor's Office)</p> <hr /> <p>As stories of overflowing trash and endless street noise pile up on <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/12/nyregion/trash-nyc.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">social media and in the news</a>, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration has repeatedly said it is working on comprehensive approaches to some of the most challenging so-called quality-of-life issues affecting New Yorkers, but has yet to reveal an overarching vision for what the city plans to do.</p> <p>Last October, Deputy Mayor of Operations Laura Anglin, who was appointed to the newly created role in January 2018, <a href="https://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7970-what-s-the-data-point-45-with-deputy-mayor-of-operations-laura-anglin" target="_blank" rel="noopener">said</a> her office was doing “a big study,” ordered by the mayor, to determine where the city needs to focus its attention to reduce complaints about quality-of-life problems. She said she wanted to identify the most critical needs utilizing a variety of indicators that go beyond some of the city’s typical metrics to see if they can shed new light on residents’ experiences.</p> <p>Under de Blasio the city has undertaken piece-meal initiatives to address quality of life, an enormous category that can include anything from neighborhood cleanliness to noise pollution to traffic congestion. Yet administration officials say they are still not ready to talk about the study ten months after Anglin mentioned it and few, if any, details have been released.</p> <p>“Our goal is to use this study to determine the specific needs of neighborhoods – and citywide – to give us a blueprint for the different solutions we can continue to implement to have a positive impact for all New Yorkers,” Anglin wrote in an email to Gotham Gazette Tuesday, without providing details on when the study might be released or its scope. She did tout the administration’s rat reduction program, which the mayor put <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/472-17/de-blasio-administration-32-million-neighborhood-rat-reduction-plan#/0" target="_blank" rel="noopener">$32 million</a> towards in 2017 and <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/195-18/mayor-de-blasio-targets-rats-extermination-10-nycha-developments#/0" target="_blank" rel="noopener">expanded</a> to 10 NYCHA facilities with serious rodent problems in 2018.</p> <p>Though Anglin’s portfolio includes a wide range of departments, both internal- and external-facing, addressing New Yorkers’ “quality of life” has been one of her primary tasks. She is responsible for overseeing the Department of Administrative Citywide Services, the Mayor’s Office of Contract Services, the Department of Finance, and the city’s information technology. The Department of Transportation, Taxi &amp; Limousine Commission, Fire Department, emergency management, and the Department of Sanitation fall under her purview as well.</p> <p>“One of the things the mayor has asked me to do is to really...look at quality-of-life issues from the resident perspective...using the survey data that [Citizens Budget Commission] has pulled together, as well as data from 311, Twitter, other social media,” Anglin said last year on the <a href="https://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7970-what-s-the-data-point-45-with-deputy-mayor-of-operations-laura-anglin" target="_blank" rel="noopener">What’s the Data Point?</a> podcast from Gotham Gazette and Citizens Budget Commission.</p> <p>Anglin was referring to a <a href="https://cbcny.org/sites/default/files/media/files/CBC%20Resident%20Feedback%20Survey%20Report.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">survey</a> of city residents conducted by CBC in 2017 to gauge public perception on the quality of city life and government services. Among other things, the survey generally expresses what the proliferation of sanitation-related images on social media reflect: New Yorkers, in many cases, are not satisfied with conditions on the street.</p> <p>According to CBC’s data, residents have pointed to noise and sanitation as among the greatest areas of dissatisfaction in the city and de Blasio seems to have taken heed of those complaints.</p> <p>When Anglin was named deputy mayor in January 2018, one of her main tasks was street cleanliness, she said in the October interview. “That’s a big thing we’re focused on here in the city and one of the things that I will be focusing on even more,” she said.</p> <p>Another was addressing noise pollution.</p> <p>Faced with a growing number of noise complaints in recent years, de Blasio has directed Anglin to prioritize ways to reduce decibel levels from countless sources in America’s largest city. Noisy neighbors, street traffic, construction, and helicopters all contribute to the loud sounds of the city. “I directed my Deputy Mayor for Operations to look at how we can reduce noise pollution across the board. I think it’s one of the biggest concerns New Yorkers have,” the mayor said on WNYC radio’s <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/ask-mayor-7-27-18/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Brian Lehrer Show last year</a>.</p> <p>A <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/nyregion/new-york-becomes-the-city-that-never-shuts-up.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">New York Times analysis</a> found that in 2016 over half of noise complaints made to 311, the city’s helpline, were due to loud music or parties. In December, responding to callers on <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/the-brian-lehrer-show-2018-12-28" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Brian Lehrer Show</a>, de Blasio suggested expanding the enforcement power of police officers responding to noise complaints. Overall, last year, the number of 311 noise complaints rose to nearly 437,000, up from roughly 260,000 in 2013.</p> <p>The CBC data shows 40.4% of residents surveyed rate the city’s control of street noise as “excellent or good,” with the worst ratings in Manhattan, the Bronx, and Brooklyn. The CBC received over 9,800 responses to its questionnaire, representing every borough, community board, and almost every neighborhood. The survey also looked at racial differences in quality-of-life satisfaction: the group least distressed by city noise are white residents – roughly 44% rated conditions favorable -- while only 35% of Hispanic respondents, the lowest rating, felt the city was doing a good job keeping noise down.</p> <p>Both before and after Anglin was promoted to deputy mayor, de Blasio has discussed measures to deal with other kinds of noise, like reducing <a href="https://nypost.com/2016/01/31/city-announces-deal-to-cut-helicopter-traffic-in-half/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">helicopter traffic</a>, limiting <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/042-18/mayor-signs-legislation-help-limit-construction-noise" target="_blank" rel="noopener">construction noise</a>, and changing the sound of <a href="https://wcbs880.radio.com/articles/city-hall-considers-gentler-sounding-sirens-reduce-noise-pollution" target="_blank" rel="noopener">emergency sirens</a>. Speaking with Gotham Gazette and CBC in October, Anglin also spoke about noise from roadwork and afterhours construction as something the city can manage.</p> <p>“Our Deputy Mayor for Operations, Laura Anglin, is putting together a new plan to address a variety of elements of noise pollution. And it needs a little more work, but we’ll have something to say on that soon,” de Blasio said more than a year ago, last August 9, in response to a press question on the subject of noise pollution, <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/405-18/transcript-mayor-de-blasio-attends-rally-celebrating-passage-for-hire-vehicle-legislation" target="_blank" rel="noopener">after a rally</a> on another topic.</p> <p>In June of this year, the mayor and City Council announced an agreement on the city’s $92.8 billion fiscal year <a href="https://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/ny-bill-de-blasio-city-council-budget-deal-fiscal-year-2020-20190614-2bk4jp43hvgqrerzmd25znrmo4-story.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">2020 budget</a>, which included $1.5 million to equip Fire Department vehicles with quieter sirens.</p> <p>The budget also included additional funding for litter basket collection – $8.6 million, up $3.5 million from the previous year according to a Department of Sanitation spokesperson. “Our committee is constantly fielding complaints from New Yorkers that there is too much trash on the streets. The solution is simple: More litter basket collection,” said Council Member Antonio Reynoso, chair of the sanitation and solid waste committee, in a statement in May calling for the mayor to restore funding for the service before the budget was finalized.</p> <p>In 2018, the Department of Sanitation received nearly 41,000 complaints through 311 related to missed refuse collections, nearly 2.5 times the number of 2013 complaints. Another 39,000 complaints fell under “dirty conditions,” up from the roughly 33,000 similar complaints filed in 2010.</p> <p>The CBC survey, which captures New Yorker satisfaction, helps put this data into perspective. Less than half of respondents -- 47.7% -- put the cleanliness of their neighborhoods in the “excellent or good” range. The results show great variability by borough and ethnicity: the Bronx and Brooklyn scored significantly lower than Staten Island; and, the survey notes, Asian and Pacific Islander and white residents were satisfied with sanitation conditions close to 10 percentage points more than other respondents.</p> <p>But the CBC survey is notably different from the types of metrics the city is currently using to evaluate issues like neighborhood cleanliness -- both in terms of methodology and results.</p> <p>Garcia told Gotham Gazette the main metric the Department of Sanitation uses to measure cleanliness is the “scorecard” produced by the Mayor’s Office of Operations and published in the annual Mayor’s Management Report, which details data on agency performance and city services. The scorecard calculates cleanliness based on data collected by field inspectors looking at things like the amount of trash in the street, which do not capture resident satisfaction. “The basic metric on cleanliness has been the scorecard, and it’s been the scorecard for years and years and years,” she said.</p> <p>Far from the CBC survey results, the scorecard rated 95% of city streets “acceptably clean” and as “filthy” just 0.2% of the time in fiscal year 2016. Questions about the scorecards have been <a href="https://www.gothamgazette.com/government/5611-bushwick-students-give-citys-street-cleanliness-scorecards-an-incomplete" target="_blank" rel="noopener">raised</a> in the past.</p> <p>“We always strive to make sure residents are happy, but I think the methodology probably is very, very different...How you feel about something can vary based on your experience. We certainly want the public to feel like everything is cleaner,” Garcia said.</p> <p>“If you’re sitting in Laura Anglin’s seat, you’re wondering, what is the disconnect here?” said Maria Doulis, Vice President of CBC, in an interview, referring to the discrepancy between the city’s metrics and the CBC survey.</p> <p>“What are folks seeing and experiencing that is different than what our inspectors are seeing? Are inspectors looking for things that don’t really matter to people?,” Doulis added. “I think those are all appropriate questions to be asking, if you’re thinking about tackling this kind of problem.”</p> <p>

***
by Ethan Geringer-Sameth, reporter, Gotham Gazette      

Read more by this writer.

</p>
What's The [Data] Point? 45, with Deputy Mayor for Operations Laura Anglin 2018-10-03T04:00:00+00:00 2018-10-03T04:00:00+00:00 https://www.gothamgazette.com/city/7970-what-s-the-data-point-45-with-deputy-mayor-of-operations-laura-anglin Ben Max <p><img src="https://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/whats-the-data-point.jpg" alt="whats the data point" width="600" height="600" /></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What's The [Data] Point? Episode 55</strong><strong> -- 45,&nbsp;Deputy Mayor for Operations Laura Anglin [You can download What's The [Data] Point? wherever you get your podcasts, including on iTunes]</strong></p> <p><img src="https://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/wtdp-with-laura-anglin-maria-ben.jpg" alt="wtdp with laura anglin maria ben" width="253" height="143" style="margin-right: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p>Laura Anglin was named Deputy Mayor for Operations by Mayor Bill de Blasio, who reestablished the position for her at the start of 2018 after he did not have a deputy mayor for operations during his frist term. Anglin, who has an extensive career in state government and the private sector, joined the podcast to discuss her role in the de Blasio administration and key projects she's working on.&nbsp;</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think: Ben Max of GG (<a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax</a>), Maria Doulis of CBC (<a href="https://twitter.com/MariaDoulis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@MariaDoulis</a>). Listen below or download wherever you get your podcasts!</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/509009955&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="175" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="https://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2017/whats-the-data-point.jpg" alt="whats the data point" width="600" height="600" /></p> <hr /> <p><strong>What's The [Data] Point? Episode 55</strong><strong> -- 45,&nbsp;Deputy Mayor for Operations Laura Anglin [You can download What's The [Data] Point? wherever you get your podcasts, including on iTunes]</strong></p> <p><img src="https://www.gothamgazette.com/images/graphics/2018/podcast18/wtdp-with-laura-anglin-maria-ben.jpg" alt="wtdp with laura anglin maria ben" width="253" height="143" style="margin-right: 10px; float: left;" /></p> <p>Laura Anglin was named Deputy Mayor for Operations by Mayor Bill de Blasio, who reestablished the position for her at the start of 2018 after he did not have a deputy mayor for operations during his frist term. Anglin, who has an extensive career in state government and the private sector, joined the podcast to discuss her role in the de Blasio administration and key projects she's working on.&nbsp;</p> <p>Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think: Ben Max of GG (<a href="https://twitter.com/TweetBenMax" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">@TweetBenMax</a>), Maria Doulis of CBC (<a href="https://twitter.com/MariaDoulis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@MariaDoulis</a>). Listen below or download wherever you get your podcasts!</p> <p><iframe src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/509009955&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true" width="100%" height="175" frameborder="no" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
City Hall Hire to Help First Deputy Mayor with Vast Portfolio 2016-12-20T05:00:00+00:00 2016-12-20T05:00:00+00:00 https://www.gothamgazette.com/city/6681-city-hall-hire-to-help-first-deputy-mayor-with-vast-portfolio Ben Max <p><img src="https://www.gothamgazette.com/images/29928483571_3c305abef8_z.jpg" width="600" height="400" alt="Tony Shorris City Hall City Council Rivington" /></p> <p>First Deputy Mayor Shorris testifies (photo: William Alatriste)</p> <hr /> <p>The de Blasio administration is bringing in a new chief administrative officer to work under First Deputy Mayor Tony Shorris starting January 1. Laura Anglin, who comes to City Hall after serving as president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities for the last seven years, “will support the work of a number of City agencies,” according to the December 15 press release announcing her hire.</p> <p>Those agencies include several within Shorris’ 30-agency portfolio, the vastness of which was a key point of contention at a City Council oversight hearing in September. At that hearing, which focused on the administratioan’s mistakes in removing deed restrictions on Rivington House, City Council Member Ben Kallos asked Shorris a series of questions about the structure of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s upper management and whether the first deputy mayor has too much on his plate. Kallos indicated that he believes de Blasio should have a deputy mayor for operations like some of his predecessors.</p> <p>Shorris repeatedly said the structure of the cabinet is up to the mayor and, while acknowledging mistakes on Rivington House, indicated that he is comfortable with his workload.</p> <p>City Hall insists that Anglin’s hire has nothing to do with Rivington, where a nonprofit health care facility is becoming market-rate condos after a series of miscommunications, questionable decisions, and limited agency oversight by Shorris. But, the new chief administrative officer will be responsible for supporting the work of the Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS), which, along with Shorris’ office, was at the center of the Rivington mishap.</p> <p>Asked on Tuesday whether Anglin was being brought on as a response to what the Rivington saga showed about Shorris’ workload, de Blasio said, “It’s a way of just making the team stronger. She’s a real proven leader; tremendous experience, particularly at the state level.”</p> <p>The mayor continued, saying that Shorris “has a huge portfolio,” and credited his first deputy with key contributions to the successes of the past three years. “I think he’s done a fantastic job,” de Blasio said of Shorris. “But, it gives us the ability to support his work more effectively, it’s as simple as that.”</p> <p>According to the announcement of her hire, Anglin will deal with agencies including “Fire, Sanitation, Transportation, DEP, DOITT, DDC, DCAS, Buildings and TLC.”</p> <p>According to the mayor’s office, Anglin will be paid $218,000 annually, coming in at a higher level, but in a sense filling several vacant positions, including a senior advisor for contracts and administration who left earlier this year.</p> <p>“This hire allows us to bring an exceptionally talented individual on to the First Deputy Mayor’s team, and in doing so, making up for some positions that were vacated earlier this year,” said Natalie Grybauskas, a de Blasio spokesperson, in a statement to Gotham Gazette.</p> <p>According to the announcement of her hire, prior to her time as CICU’s president, Anglin “spent time working as the First Deputy Budget Director and Budget Director for New York State, largely in charge of managing the State’s financial plan and proposals. Additionally, Anglin has spent time as an economist at the New York Department of Environmental Conservation, an Econometrician at the New York Department of Taxation and Finance, and has had various roles in the NY State Assembly.”</p> <p>During the September hearing on the Rivington matter, Council Member Kallos asked Shorris about his portfolio, at one point asking him if he agreed that approximately 30 agencies is “a lot,” to which Shorris replied “Yes.”</p> <p>When Kallos asked why there is no deputy mayor for operations under de Blasio, Shorris said, “Well, the decision on the structure of the government at City Hall is obviously the Mayor's decision; we discussed that and there are many models. As I'm sure you know, over the course of the years there have been many different structures for City Hall -- some have first deputy mayors, some don't; some have deputy mayors for operations, some don't; some have seven deputy mayors; some have three; it's all based on how a mayor wants to organize his government and do so effectively.”</p> <p>De Blasio has structured his government with Shorris as first deputy mayor for the entirety of his term thus far, and three other deputy mayors, one each for housing and economic development (Alicia Glen throughout); health and human services (currently Dr. Herminia Palacio); and strategic policy initiatives (Richard Buery throughout).</p> <p>Kallos, who declined to comment for this article, asked Shorris if he felt that he had been able to “effectively manage” his vast portfolio. “I'm extremely proud of the record of this administration in implementing a series of initiatives,” Shorris said, before Kallos interrupted and the two simultaneously for a few moments.</p> <p>One breakdown in the Rivington chain of events was that Shorris had stopped reading the weekly memos prepared for him by commissioners who report to him and key decisions were being made that were not otherwise communicated in person or by phone or email. The memos came up during the hearing, with Kallos asking about them and whether Shorris reads them.</p> <p>“As I mentioned in my testimony, Councilman, when I began, I asked [commissioners] to provide a weekly memo that summarized their activities in the prior week,” Shorris said. “I initially read some of them, 'cause I was obviously trying to learn the way the government operated. Over time, as I became more comfortable with the operations of the government and my meetings with the agencies became more and more frequent, that became less necessary; as a result, as I mentioned in my testimony, I took to reviewing the memos on an episodic basis, just to sort of get a feel for what was going on -- they were not decision-making vehicles.”</p> <p>“So have you told the commissioners and agencies that they don't actually have to do these anymore because they're not useful?” Kallos asked.</p> <p>“No,” Shorris responded. “No, what I've told them is they should continue to send them and our staff reviews them, I review some of them. From time to time they provide information that's helpful in context, but they're not for decision-making, Councilman, but they have other purposes.”</p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>
<p><img src="https://www.gothamgazette.com/images/29928483571_3c305abef8_z.jpg" width="600" height="400" alt="Tony Shorris City Hall City Council Rivington" /></p> <p>First Deputy Mayor Shorris testifies (photo: William Alatriste)</p> <hr /> <p>The de Blasio administration is bringing in a new chief administrative officer to work under First Deputy Mayor Tony Shorris starting January 1. Laura Anglin, who comes to City Hall after serving as president of the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities for the last seven years, “will support the work of a number of City agencies,” according to the December 15 press release announcing her hire.</p> <p>Those agencies include several within Shorris’ 30-agency portfolio, the vastness of which was a key point of contention at a City Council oversight hearing in September. At that hearing, which focused on the administratioan’s mistakes in removing deed restrictions on Rivington House, City Council Member Ben Kallos asked Shorris a series of questions about the structure of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s upper management and whether the first deputy mayor has too much on his plate. Kallos indicated that he believes de Blasio should have a deputy mayor for operations like some of his predecessors.</p> <p>Shorris repeatedly said the structure of the cabinet is up to the mayor and, while acknowledging mistakes on Rivington House, indicated that he is comfortable with his workload.</p> <p>City Hall insists that Anglin’s hire has nothing to do with Rivington, where a nonprofit health care facility is becoming market-rate condos after a series of miscommunications, questionable decisions, and limited agency oversight by Shorris. But, the new chief administrative officer will be responsible for supporting the work of the Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS), which, along with Shorris’ office, was at the center of the Rivington mishap.</p> <p>Asked on Tuesday whether Anglin was being brought on as a response to what the Rivington saga showed about Shorris’ workload, de Blasio said, “It’s a way of just making the team stronger. She’s a real proven leader; tremendous experience, particularly at the state level.”</p> <p>The mayor continued, saying that Shorris “has a huge portfolio,” and credited his first deputy with key contributions to the successes of the past three years. “I think he’s done a fantastic job,” de Blasio said of Shorris. “But, it gives us the ability to support his work more effectively, it’s as simple as that.”</p> <p>According to the announcement of her hire, Anglin will deal with agencies including “Fire, Sanitation, Transportation, DEP, DOITT, DDC, DCAS, Buildings and TLC.”</p> <p>According to the mayor’s office, Anglin will be paid $218,000 annually, coming in at a higher level, but in a sense filling several vacant positions, including a senior advisor for contracts and administration who left earlier this year.</p> <p>“This hire allows us to bring an exceptionally talented individual on to the First Deputy Mayor’s team, and in doing so, making up for some positions that were vacated earlier this year,” said Natalie Grybauskas, a de Blasio spokesperson, in a statement to Gotham Gazette.</p> <p>According to the announcement of her hire, prior to her time as CICU’s president, Anglin “spent time working as the First Deputy Budget Director and Budget Director for New York State, largely in charge of managing the State’s financial plan and proposals. Additionally, Anglin has spent time as an economist at the New York Department of Environmental Conservation, an Econometrician at the New York Department of Taxation and Finance, and has had various roles in the NY State Assembly.”</p> <p>During the September hearing on the Rivington matter, Council Member Kallos asked Shorris about his portfolio, at one point asking him if he agreed that approximately 30 agencies is “a lot,” to which Shorris replied “Yes.”</p> <p>When Kallos asked why there is no deputy mayor for operations under de Blasio, Shorris said, “Well, the decision on the structure of the government at City Hall is obviously the Mayor's decision; we discussed that and there are many models. As I'm sure you know, over the course of the years there have been many different structures for City Hall -- some have first deputy mayors, some don't; some have deputy mayors for operations, some don't; some have seven deputy mayors; some have three; it's all based on how a mayor wants to organize his government and do so effectively.”</p> <p>De Blasio has structured his government with Shorris as first deputy mayor for the entirety of his term thus far, and three other deputy mayors, one each for housing and economic development (Alicia Glen throughout); health and human services (currently Dr. Herminia Palacio); and strategic policy initiatives (Richard Buery throughout).</p> <p>Kallos, who declined to comment for this article, asked Shorris if he felt that he had been able to “effectively manage” his vast portfolio. “I'm extremely proud of the record of this administration in implementing a series of initiatives,” Shorris said, before Kallos interrupted and the two simultaneously for a few moments.</p> <p>One breakdown in the Rivington chain of events was that Shorris had stopped reading the weekly memos prepared for him by commissioners who report to him and key decisions were being made that were not otherwise communicated in person or by phone or email. The memos came up during the hearing, with Kallos asking about them and whether Shorris reads them.</p> <p>“As I mentioned in my testimony, Councilman, when I began, I asked [commissioners] to provide a weekly memo that summarized their activities in the prior week,” Shorris said. “I initially read some of them, 'cause I was obviously trying to learn the way the government operated. Over time, as I became more comfortable with the operations of the government and my meetings with the agencies became more and more frequent, that became less necessary; as a result, as I mentioned in my testimony, I took to reviewing the memos on an episodic basis, just to sort of get a feel for what was going on -- they were not decision-making vehicles.”</p> <p>“So have you told the commissioners and agencies that they don't actually have to do these anymore because they're not useful?” Kallos asked.</p> <p>“No,” Shorris responded. “No, what I've told them is they should continue to send them and our staff reviews them, I review some of them. From time to time they provide information that's helpful in context, but they're not for decision-making, Councilman, but they have other purposes.”</p> <p>

***
by Ben Max, Gotham Gazette
     

Read more by this writer.

</p>