Gotham Gazette

The Place for New York Policy and politics

Education

Education

  • holds ava photo

    Mayor de Blasio and Chancellor Carranza (photo: Ed Reed/Mayor's Office)


    In July 2018, a few months after New York City welcomed a new schools chancellor, The Atlantic asked, “Can Richard Carranza Integrate the Most Segregated School System in the Country?”

    Now we have our answer. On Friday, Carranza announced his resignation, attributing it to the emotional toll the pandemic had taken on

    ...
  • students school steps

    Kids back to school (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayor's Office)


    On Thursday morning, February 25, thousands of New York's middle school students scrambled for misplaced backpacks and student MetroCards, trundled out the door, and made their way to long-abandoned classrooms, ready at last to resume in-person instruction after months of remote learning. Thousands of teachers were there to greet them—many no doubt wearing nervous but enthusiastic grins behind their doubled-up facemasks.

    Sadly, my daughter Karina—a seventh-grader at Brooklyn's MS 88—wasn’t

    ...
  • attends rally parental

    "Parental Choice in Education" (photo: Governor Cuomo's Office/Kevin P. Coughlin)


    My career began with my yeshiva education; a rigorous study of the Talmud that sparked a relentless pursuit of reason.

    There is a common misconception that religious studies are not as academically rigorous as secular education, but that is far from the truth. Yeshiva education fosters logic and logic fosters innovative problem-solving. Yeshiva education is, quite frankly, more beneficial to the development of students’ analytical skills than secular

    ...
  • back 2 school

    Mayor de Blasio & Chancellor Carranza visit a school (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayor's Office)


    In our latest video brief on key issues at play in the 2021 New York City elections, with a focus on the race for mayor, hosts Jarrett Murphy and Ben Max discuss education. Key topics within the larger issue include who the next mayor will appoint as a schools chancellor, how the next mayor and chancellor will manage the sprawling education bureaucracy, how candidates are talking about hot-button issues including school desegregation, charter schools, and much

    ...
  • second round comm

    Gov. Cuomo visits a school (photo: governor's office)


    Thanks to the election of the Biden-Harris ticket and a newly Democratic U.S. Congress, New York can expect much more favorable treatment in any new federal pandemic relief program than it would have received from the Trump administration or Republican Congress.

    But however much New York gets from the federal government in the coming months, it won’t be enough for our public school children if the state uses that federal aid to replace rather than add to the state’s own funding of our

    ...
  • 1 gifted talented

    Mayor de Blasio (photo: Edwin J. Torres/ Mayoral Photo Office)


    The politics of New York City public schools reached a fever pitch last week, when the Panel for Education Policy (PEP) voted down a vendor contract to give the Gifted and Talented (G&T) test this Spring. Along with 22 other Community Education Council members from throughout the city and one state senator, I testified in opposition to the contract for several reasons.

    First, the mayor recently announced that starting in 2022, the test would no longer be administered for admissions.

    ...
  • first lady cm

    The Mayor, First Lady, & Chancellor at a school (photo: Ed Reed/Mayor's Office)


    Last week, Mayor de Blasio and Schools Chancellor Carranza announced that they will administer the controversial and problematic test for admissions to “gifted and talented” classes this spring, for perhaps a final year. Then: 

    “We will spend the next year engaging communities around what kind of programming they would like to see that is more inclusive, enriching, and truly supports the needs of academically advanced and diversely talented students at a more appropriate

    ...
  • students with technology nyc schools hs

    Schools need computers (photo: Ed Reed/Mayor's Office)


    On November 20, a City Council hearing revealed that 60,000 students still lacked an internet-enabled device from the Department of Education (DOE) to participate in remote learning, which had begun more than eight months prior. That number of students lacking sufficient technology only grows when you include students who lack headphones, keyboards, or other critical pieces of technology that allow students

    ...
  • schools communites dec

    The men making schools decisions (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayor's Office)


    School reopening has been a particular challenge for women in New York City. From lack of communication between the Department of Education, staff, and caregivers, constantly changing schedules, failure to invest in a care economy that values domestic labor and childcare, lack of tech support, and lack of funding to the daily demands of remote learning and the material conditions in schools, women have been hit hardest by the struggles our schools face. 

    As we think about how

    ...
  • schools jhs bk

    Mayor de Blasio at a schools announcement (photo: Benjamin Kanter/Mayor's Office)


    When I was younger, my grandfather - an asylum seeker - used to tell me that hard work and persistence will always be rewarded. After all, he became successful in the United States after years of injustice in Egypt. And so, I believed him.

    But during my time in high school, I have learned that this idea of hard work amounting to success is not the case in the New York City public school system.

    Right before I was born, my family moved into a tiny downtown apartment

    ...
  • mayor school crowd

    Mayor de Blasio at school (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayor's Office)


    Mayor de Blasio's mishandling of the public school pandemic response has led to calls to reform or replace mayoral control of New York City schools.

    Almost six years ago, I wrote in these pages advocating the case for mayoral control based on the still-valid theory that quality education depends on maximum funding based on the Mayor's control of the city budget and the need for political

    ...
  • bck 2 sch

    Students back in school amid a pandemic (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office)


    The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound effects for children across New York City and State, as well as their families, like the loss of a loved one, economic distress, food insecurity, and the shutdown of school buildings, switch to remote learning, and lack of in-person social connections.

    During the first five months of the pandemic, an estimated 4,200 of 4 million children in the state lost a parent or caregiver to coronavirus, a rate of more than one out of every 1,000, according to a

    ...
  • 3 cm joins

    Council Member Mark Treyger, right (photo: John McCarten/City Council)


    November 18, 2020 - Max & Murphy Podcast: City Council Education Chair Mark Treyger on What's Next for City Schools

    Brooklyn City Council Member Mark Treyger, chair of the Council's education committee and a former teacher, joined the show to discuss the closure of city school buildings and what's next, including a proposal he has for how to restructure in-person learning.

    Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think -- we're on Twitter ...

  • ric mental hyg

    (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office)


    As the city’s seven-day rolling average positive test rate for COVID-19 approaches 3% and with the Mayor and Department of Education seemingly on the brink of closing schools again, public school parents, like me, are anxious and angry. Students, teachers, administrators, and parents have done everything we promised to keep our schools open, safe, and healthy. Shutting down schools that have experienced few or no covid cases makes no sense. Shutting down all in-person schooling is an assault on parents and

    ...
  • nyc schools mayor class visit doorway

    The mayor and chancellor at a school (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayor's Office)


    Over 300,000 New York City students with disabilities still do not have the means to learn and receive services effectively online. And families can no longer emotionally endure being full-time caregivers, teachers, and therapists. The city needs a plan right now.

    The pandemic has further widened the achievement gap between students with disabilities and their peers. Remote learning and teletherapy -- speech, occupational, and physical therapy, as

    ...
  • 1 school ag

    Children at school (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office)


    While parents of color have been less likely to send their children into New York City school buildings when they reopened amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, thousands of Black, Hispanic, and Asian students recently completed their first month of blended learning, which includes at least one day per week of in-person school.

    When nearly all public school buildings

    ...
  • education failing immigrant

    A student reporting to school (photo: Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office)


    From English-only robo calls and critical emails to online-only surveys and a dearth of information in community media outlets, immigrant families have been left out of remote learning in New York, and they are confused and deeply concerned. 

    COVID-19 forced schools across the nation and in New York State to close in mid-March, quickly exacerbating pre-existing inequities in New York’s education system through the transition to remote learning. For New York’s

    ...
  • back school parkside

    Students return to schools (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office)


    Black, brown, and indigenous students are suspended from school more than any racial or ethnic groups in the United States. This disproportionality exacerbates educational inequities. By controlling misbehavior, rather than correcting it, excessive school discipline has lifelong negative impacts on well-being, academic, and professional success. 

    The long-term consequences of racially-biased discipline in schools will be even more devastating in a school year as unique and

    ...
  • remote learning NYC schools

    Remote learning in action (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayor's Office)


    Confidence in the New York City Department of Education and other local leaders is low for Yalena Figueroa, a Hispanic mother of two public school students learning remotely this school year from Astoria, Queens.

    Figueroa wanted to send her fifth-grader and ninth-grader back to school, especially her teenager starting at a new high school. However, due to the concerns raised by teachers and news outlets, she said remote learning was a no-brainer for her. Both Figueroa

    ...
  • 4 cuny handling

    (photo: @CUNYedu)


    A month into the City University of New York’s fall semester, the COVID-19 pandemic, budget cuts, a drop in student enrollment, and anxiety remain the hallmarks of an uncertain new period in the history of the nation’s largest public urban university system. CUNY has chosen to remain almost entirely virtual this semester, with fewer than 2 percent of the fall semester’s 50,000 classes occurring in person.  

    Preliminary figures show CUNY’s enrollment dropping by roughly 4.4% since last fall, according to a CUNY spokesperson who

    ...
  • holds avail 600

    CSA President Mark Cannizzaro (photo: Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office)


    September 30, 2020 - Max & Murphy Podcast: Principals Union President Mark Cannizzaro on Reopening New York City Schools

    Mark Cannizzaro, the president of the Council of School Supervisors and Administrators, joined the show to discuss the reopening of New York City schools, what principals still need, and his union's vote of 'no confidence' in Mayor Bill de Blasio and Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza.

    Listen to the conversation and let us know what you

    ...
  • 1 max murphy podcast tour chancellor

    Mayor de Blasio & Chancellor Carranza visit a school (photo: Ed Reed/Mayor's Office)


    September 23, 2020 - Max & Murphy Podcast: New York City's Choppy School Reopening

    Reema Amin, reporter for from education-focused publication Chalkbeat New York, joined the show to discuss New York City's choppy and limited reopening of in-person school, questions around all-remote and blended learning, and much more.

    Listen to the conversation and let us know what you think --

    ...
  • first lady prek

    Mayor and Chancellor on first day of school (photo: Ed Reed/Mayor's Office)


    This city continues to fail us as we attempt to begin the school year safely. Not utilizing any of the months since March to make a safe, equitable reopening plan is unacceptable, and the constant changes to the plan are throwing the lives of many families and educators into complete disarray. It’s time to chart a better path.

    Each week brings daily changes as leadership continually pulls the rug out from under students, parents, and educators. Late last Tuesday evening, the night before

    ...
  • cm bl outdoor

    A student ready to learn during a pandemic (photo: Emil Cohen/City Council)


    I’ve been scared for a long time now, but not like this. 

    My colleague, Sandra Santos-Vizcaino, was the first New York City teacher to lose her life to COVID-19. Today — Thursday, September 10 — I return to our same school without the confidence my district has the resources to provide the expensive equipment, testing, and contract

    ...
  • 3 cuny delayed

    (photo: City University of New York)


    Attaining a bachelor’s degree takes longer than four years for some full-time CUNY students who are unable to register for required and elective courses due to insufficient seats, a problem whose scope was revealed in a new audit by New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. Delaying graduation is time consuming, expensive, and can mean no

    ...